Popular Leukemia Cells News and Current Events

Popular Leukemia Cells News and Current Events, Leukemia Cells News Articles.
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Penn-developed approach could limit toxicity of CAR T therapy in acute myeloid leukemia
A new approach pioneered at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center may provide a new path towards treating acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with CAR T cells. (2018-05-31)

Metabolite that promotes cancer cell transformation and colorectal cancer spread identified
Osaka University researchers revealed that the metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread. The finding highlights the value of targeting D-2HG to establish new therapeutic approaches against colorectal cancer. (2016-12-01)

New blood cancer treatment works by selectively interfering with cancer cell signalling
University of Alberta scientists have identified the mechanism of action behind a new type of precision cancer drug for blood cancers that is set for human trials, according to research published in Nature Communications. (2020-10-22)

Stem cell scientists discover genetic switch to increase supply of stem cells from cord blood
International stem cell scientists, co-led in Canada by Dr. John Dick and in the Netherlands by Dr. Gerald de Haan, have discovered the switch to harness the power of cord blood and potentially increase the supply of stem cells for cancer patients needing transplantation therapy to fight their disease. (2016-07-14)

Cholesterol-like molecules switch off the engine in cancer-targeting Natural Killer cells
The engine used by cancer-killing 'Natural Killer' cells is turned on by a protein called Srebp, which can be blocked by certain sterols like cholesterol. Tumor cells can produce oxysterols and cholesterol levels tend to be higher in people with obesity. (2017-09-18)

Moffitt researchers identify new target to reduce risk of GVHD
Moffitt Cancer Center researchers are trying to identify new drug targets to reduce the risk of GVHD. Their new study, published last week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, shows a drug that targets the protein JAK2 may reduce the risk of GVHD. (2018-02-05)

Mutations in bone cells can drive leukemia in neighboring stem cells
DNA mutations in bone cells that support blood development can drive leukemia formation in nearby blood stem cells. This neighbor cell effect was observed in a mouse model of Noonan syndrome. In mice, drugs can stop the effect and potentially could combat leukemia progression/recurrence. (2016-10-26)

Investigational drug with immunotherapy may provide new therapeutic opportunity for patients previously treated for kidney and lung cancer
Investigational drug with immunotherapy may provide new therapeutic opportunity for patients previously treated for kidney and lung cancer. Pegilodecakin with pembrolizumab and nivolumab shown to be safe in Phase 1B study (2019-09-25)

Healthy blood stem cells have as many DNA mutations as leukemic cells
Researchers from the Princess Máxima Center for Pediatric Oncology have shown that the number of mutations in healthy and leukemic blood stem cells does not differ. Rather the location of the mutations in the DNA is relevant. Using the mutation patterns in the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) the team was able to trace the developmental lineage tree of the cells. (2018-11-28)

Scientists use gene editing to eliminate viruses in live pigs
Scientists have edited the pig genome to deactivate a family of retroviruses. The results hold important implications for transplant medicine in humans. (2017-08-10)

Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of divisions of a cancer cell. This effect is reported in the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (2017-11-10)

Combination therapy more effective than chemotherapy alone for many newly diagnosed leukemia patients
A Phase II study pairing azacitidine with enasidenib boosts complete remission in patients with AML with IDH2 mutations. (2019-12-09)

CRISPR helps find new genetic suspects behind ALS/FTD
NIH-funded researchers used the gene editing tool CRISPR to rapidly identify genes in the human genome that might modify the severity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) caused by mutations in a gene called C9orf72. The results of the search uncovered a new set of genes that may hasten neuron death during the disease. (2018-03-12)

U of M begins nation's first clinical trial using T-reg cells from cord blood in leukemia treatment
University of Minnesota researchers have initiated a ground breaking clinical trial to determine the optimal dose and safety of T regulatory cells (T-regs) to decrease the risk of immune reactions common in patients undergoing blood and marrow transplantation. (2007-09-05)

Personalizing chemotherapy to treat pediatric leukemia
A team of UCLA bioengineers has demonstrated that its technology may go a long way toward overcoming the challenges of treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia, among the most common types of cancer in children, and has the potential to help doctors personalize drug doses. (2016-12-12)

Ancient anti-inflammatory drug salicylic acid has cancer-fighting properties
Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have identified a new pathway by which salicylic acid -- a key compound in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin and diflunisal -- stops inflammation and tumor growth in cancer. Both salicylic acid and diflunisal suppress two key proteins that help control gene expression throughout the body. By inhibiting these proteins, the two drugs block the activation of other proteins involved in inflammation and cell growth, including one linked to leukemia. (2016-05-31)

Oral drug sets a new survival standard for bone marrow cancer
Findings from two large, international clinical trials show (2007-11-21)

Study explores impact of obesity on bone marrow cells
New research published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine highlights the pernicious effect of obesity on the long-term health of blood-making stem cells (hematopoietic stem cells). Published Dec. 27 and conducted largely in genetic models of obese mice, the study shows obesity causes durable and harmful changes to the hematopoietic stem cell compartment - the blood-making factory in our bodies. (2017-12-27)

Reprogrammed blood vessels promote cancer spread
Tumor cells use the bloodstream to spread in the body. To reach the blood, they first have to pass the wall of the vessel. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center have now identified a trick that the cancer cells use: They activate a cellular signal in the vessel lining cells. This makes the passage easier and promotes metastasis. In experiments with mice, the researchers were able to block this process using antibodies. (2017-03-03)

Lymphoma overrides a key protein's quadruple locks
Protein chemists at Johns Hopkins report they are closer to explaining why certain blood cancers are able to crack a molecular security system and run rampant. (2016-03-22)

How cells detect, mend DNA damage may improve chemotherapy
Human cells have a way of detecting and mending DNA damage caused by some common chemotherapy drugs, according to a new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The findings could have important implications for treating cancer. (2017-11-08)

Deep sea creatures provide a guiding light in the quest to develop cancer therapies
Scientists at the Keck School of Medicine of USC use enzymes responsible for marine animal bioluminescence to help researchers test whether cancer immunotherapies work. (2018-01-09)

The HLF-gene controls the generation of our long-term immune system
A research group at Lund University in Sweden has found that when the HLF (hepatic leukemia factor) gene -- which is expressed in immature blood cells -- does not shut down on time, we are unable to develop a functional long-term immune system. This could be a very early stage of leukemia. (2017-11-22)

Researchers identify compound to prevent breast cancer cells from activating in brain
Researchers at Houston Methodist used computer modeling to find an existing investigational drug compound for leukemia patients to treat triple negative breast cancer once it spreads to the brain. (2018-03-22)

An errant editing enzyme promotes tumor suppressor loss and leukemia propagation
UC San Diego researchers have found a stem cell enzyme copy edits more than 20 tumor types, providing new therapeutic target for preventing cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. (2019-01-03)

UCLA researchers identify leukemia stem cells
Stem cell researchers at UCLA have identified a type of leukemia stem cell and uncovered the molecular and genetic mechanisms that cause a normal blood stem cells to become cancerous. (2008-05-23)

Multifunctional protein contributes to blood cell development
Salk researchers uncover mechanism for how blood cells mature and specialize--and why errors can sometimes lead to leukemia. (2017-12-21)

Patients with advanced lymphoma in remission after T-cell therapy
In a paper published today in Science Translational Medicine, researchers from Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center shared data from an early-phase study of patients with advanced non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) who received JCAR014, a Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T cell treatment, and chemotherapy. CAR T cells are made from a patient's own immune cells that are then genetically engineered to better identify and kill cancer cells. (2016-09-07)

Salk scientists curb growth of cancer cells by blocking access to key nutrients
Salk researchers have discovered how to curb the growth of cancer cells by blocking the cells' access to certain nutrients. (2018-01-10)

Tracking down T cell targets to tamp down HIV infection
Scientists have narrowed in on a group of gut-residing immune cells that might predispose women to increased HIV infection risk and more severe disease. (2018-01-24)

New CAR T case study shows promise in acute myeloid leukemia
According to a case study from trial published online ahead of print in the journal Haematologica, a patient has remained cancer free for nine months after being treated with CYAD-01, followed by a bone marrow transplant. (2018-05-09)

Mysterious gene transcripts after cancer therapy
Drugs that are used in cancer therapy to erase epigenetic alterations in cancer cells simultaneously promote the production of countless mysterious gene transcripts, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center now report in Nature Genetics. The substances activate hidden regulatory elements in DNA. The unusual gene activity has the potential to stimulate the immune system -- a previously unnoticed effect that may increase the effect of therapeutic agents. (2017-06-12)

Nature of immune cells in the human brain disclosed
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and Amsterdam UMC have disclosed the nature of how T cells protect the brain against harmful viruses. The results of the study, which are published in Nature Communications, are important for investigating the role of the immune system in numerous brain disorders. (2018-11-02)

Dana-Farber/Boston Children's opens immunotherapy trial for children with leukemia
Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center has joined a clinical trial of immunotherapy for children with relapsed or treatment-resistant acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Led by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the trial is one of several nationally that are evaluating an approach that triggers a patient's immune system to attack cancer. Dana-Farber/Boston Children's is the only New England site offering this experimental approach for children and adolescents with relapsed/refractory ALL. (2015-05-11)

Melatonin may help treat blood cancers
Researchers have examined the potential benefits of melatonin, a hormone made by a small gland in the brain, for treating blood cancers such as leukemia and lymphoma. (2017-09-01)

All pooped out -- this is how norovirus does it
Researchers have long sought to identify the cells in the gut that are susceptible to infection by norovirus, the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide -- and now one team has pinpointed the type of cell that falls victim. (2018-04-12)

Fracking the immune system
Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are the first to report links between early life exposure to chemicals in ground water near fracking sites and immune system imbalances in mice. Their findings suggest that exposure to these chemicals during development may adversely affect the immune system's ability to fight diseases like multiple sclerosis later in life. (2018-05-01)

New key regulator of acquisition of immune tolerance to tumor cells in cancer patients
Researchers of the Chromatin and Disease Group from the Bellvitge Biomedical Research Institute (IDIBELL) in Barcelona have identified a distinctive epigenetic event in immune cells that differentiate in the tumoral microenvironment and make them tolerant to cancer cells. (2017-10-03)

T cell therapy shows persistent benefits in young leukemia patients
Updated results from a global clinical trial of the CAR T-cell therapy, tisagenlecleucel, a landmark personalized treatment for a high-risk form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), reveal that children and young adults continued to show high rates of durable, complete remission of their disease. Most side effects were short-lived and reversible. (2018-01-31)

Heart derived stem cells develop into heart muscle
Dutch researchers at University Medical Center Utrecht and the Hubrecht Institute have succeeded in growing large numbers of stem cells from adult human hearts into new heart muscle cells. A breakthrough in stem cell research. Until now, it was necessary to use embryonic stem cells to make this happen. The findings are published in the latest issue of the journal Stem Cell Research. (2008-04-23)

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