Popular Lignin News and Current Events

Popular Lignin News and Current Events, Lignin News Articles.
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New 'promiscuous' enzyme helps turn plant waste into sustainable products
A new family of enzymes has been discovered which paves the way to convert plant waste into sustainable and high-value products such as nylon, plastics, chemicals, and fuels. (2018-06-27)

Scientists discover new 'architecture' in corn
New research on the US's most economically important agricultural plant -- corn -- has revealed a different internal structure of the plant than previously thought, which can help optimize how corn is converted into ethanol. (2019-01-21)

A sweeter way to make green products
University of Delaware researchers have invented a more efficient process for extracting the sugars from wood chips, corn cobs and other organic waste from forests and farms. This biorenewable feedstock could serve as a cheaper, sustainable substitute for the petroleum used in manufacturing tons of consumer goods annually -- goods that consumers want to be greener. (2017-09-08)

Giant bacteria make algae easy to stomach
Symbiotic giant bacteria enable Red Sea surgeonfish to specialize their diets. (2017-10-10)

New research reveals why chili peppers are hot
Despite the popularity of spicy cuisine among Homo sapiens, the hotness in chili peppers has always been something of an evolutionary mystery. (2008-08-11)

Scientists identify a novel target for corn straw utilization
A team of scientists led by Prof. FU Chunxiang from the Qingdao Institute of Bioenergy and Bioprocess Technology completed the identification of bm5 mutant. This was the first time that the locus of maize bm5 mutant had been identified. (2019-04-19)

Elephant and cow manure for making paper sustainably
It's likely not the first thing you think of when you see elephant or cow dung, but this material turns out to be an excellent source of cellulose for paper manufacturing. Upcycling manure into paper products could be a cheap and environmentally sound method to get rid of this pervasive agricultural waste. The researchers will present their results today at the 255th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-03-21)

Wood formation model to fuel progress in bioenergy, paper, new applications
Need stronger timber, better biofuels or new sources of green chemicals? A systems biology model developed over decades of research led by NC State University will accelerate progress in engineering trees for specific needs. (2018-04-20)

Termite gut holds a secret to breaking down plant biomass
In the Microbial Sciences Building at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the incredibly efficient eating habits of a fungus-cultivating termite are surprising even to those well acquainted with the insect's natural gift for turning wood to dust. (2017-04-17)

Mobile genetic elements that alter the function of nearby genes are detected
Raúl Castanera-Andrés, an engineer in the Agri-Food Engineering and Rural Environment Department of the NUP/UPNA-Public University of Navarre, has worked on detecting mobile genetic elements (transposons) in basidiomycete fungi, a type of well-known fungi because they produce edible mushrooms and are active degraders of lignocellulosic waste. (2017-12-20)

Lignin -- A supergreen fuel for fuel cells
Researchers from the Laboratory of Organic Electronics at Linköping University have developed a fuel cell that uses lignin, a cheap by-product from paper manufacture and one of the most common biopolymers. (2018-05-14)

Plants get a brace to precisely shed flowers and leaves
A study on how petals fall, and plants cope with the lost. To protect reproductive organs from bacterial and external harm, plants create a special brace to assure an accurate detaching process and a coating to seal the open cut left by the shedding (2018-05-03)

Fiber composition in rice coproducts revealed in Illinois study
Rice coproducts in pig diets add fat and fiber, but too much fiber can decrease energy absorption and digestibility. A recent study from the University of Illinois characterizes the chemical composition of fiber in rice and rice coproducts, which could lead to diet interventions for improved digestibility. (2019-02-01)

Durable wood carbon sponge could be the future of wearable sensors, pollutant treatment
Engineers have for the first time demonstrated that wood can be directly converted into a carbon sponge capable of enduring repeated compression and other extreme mechanical conditions. This new wood carbon sponge overcomes several limiting factors of other lightweight, compressible carbon sponges because it is simpler, less expensive, and more sustainable to produce. It can be used in various applications such as energy storage (e.g., batteries), pollutant treatment, and electronic devices and sensors. (2018-03-01)

Thermal modification of wood and a complex study of its properties by magnetic resonance
Researchers from Institute of Physics of Kazan Federal University, Institute of Perspective Research Tatarstan Academy of Sciences, and Nanoscience Department of Institut Neel conducted an investigation of various thermally treated wood species from the Central European part of Russia by magnetic resonance methods and revealed important changes in wood structure which were not available for observation by other methods. (2016-05-25)

Wood sponge soaks up oil from water (video)
Oil spills and industrial discharge can contaminate water with greasy substances. Although it's true that oil and water don't mix, separating and recovering each component can still be challenging. Now, researchers have created sponges made from wood that selectively absorb oil, and then can be squeezed out and used again. They report their results in ACS Nano. (2018-10-24)

Why a curious crustacean could hold secret to making renewable energy from wood
Scientists studying gribble -- a curious wood-eating crustacean -- have discovered how they are able to digest wood despite being the only known animal to have a sterile digestive system. The discovery may help to develop cheaper and more sustainable tools for converting wood into biofuel in the future. (2018-12-03)

Pulling the tablecloth out from under essential metabolism
Most organisms share the biosynthetic pathways for making crucial nutrients because it is is dangerous to tinker with them. But now a collaborative team of scientists has caught plants in the process of altering where and how cells make an essential amino acid. (2017-06-26)

Biomass heating could get a 'green' boost with the help of fungi
In colder weather, people have long been warming up around campfires and woodstoves. Lately, this idea of burning wood or other biomass for heat has surged in popularity as an alternative to using fossil fuels. Now, in the journal ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering, scientists report a step toward a 'greener' way to generate heat with biomass. Rather than burning it, which releases pollutants, they let fungi break it down to release heat. (2016-10-19)

Recycling plant material into stock chemicals with electrochemistry
While most people think of recycling in terms of the packaging for household products, the concept can extend to the chemistry to make them in the first place. Certain plant components are a promising renewable source for commodity chemicals. Today, in ACS Central Science, researchers reveal an easy new way to break down one of the most common plant compounds, called lignin, and recycle it into useful chemicals. (2017-06-07)

Critical plant gene takes unexpected detour that could boost biofuel yields
For decades, biologists have believed a key enzyme in plants had one function -- produce amino acids, which are vital to plant survival and also essential to human diets. But for Wellington Muchero, Meng Xie and their colleagues, this enzyme does more than advertised. They had run a series of experiments on poplar plants that consistently revealed mutations in a structure of the life-sustaining enzyme that was not previously known to exist. (2018-06-15)

Breakthrough in lignin research: Spherical particles multiply enzyme efficiency
Lignin, a pulp industry by-product, could replace fossil materials. (2018-06-12)

Titan probes depths of biofuel's biggest barrier
Cellulosic ethanol -- fuel derived from woody plants and waste biomass -- has the potential to become an affordable, renewable transportation fuel that rivals gasoline, but lignin, one of the most ubiquitous components of the plant cell wall, gets in the way. To better understand exactly how lignin persists, a team based at Oak Ridge National Laboratory created one of the largest biomolecular simulations to date -- a 23.7-million atom system representing pretreated biomass (cellulose and lignin) in the presence of enzymes. (2016-02-16)

Super wood could replace steel
Engineers at the University of Maryland, College Park have found a way to make wood more than 10 times stronger and tougher than before, creating a natural substance that is stronger than many titanium alloys. (2018-02-07)

Sticky situation: New process turns wood scraps into tape
A team of chemical engineers at the University of Delaware has developed a more sustainable way of making high-performance adhesives. Their novel new process takes a plant material called lignin -- a substance paper manufacturers throw away -- and turns them into tape. Their invention performs just as well as at least two commercially available products. (2018-06-05)

Story tips from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, July 2018
ORNL story tips: Oak Ridge National Laboratory assists FEMA with structural damage data from Hawaii lava flows; self-healing super-stretchy material could lead to longer-lasting consumer products; ORNL 3D prints plant-based plastic polymers; mini-grid safely tests components to the max; neutrons uncover pathway to new algae strains for sustainable biofuels. (2018-07-02)

Researchers discover new enzyme paradigm for critical reaction researchers discover new enzyme paradigm for critical reaction in converting lignin to useful produce useful products
An international research team, including scientists from the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has discovered and characterized a new family of cytochrome P450 enzymes that is critical to improving the conversion of lignin--one of the main components of plants--into valuable products such as nylon, plastics, and chemicals. (2018-07-03)

Transparent wood can store and release heat (video)
Wood may seem more at home in log cabins than modern architecture, but a specially treated type of timber could be tomorrow's trendy building material. Today, scientists report a new kind of transparent wood that not only transmits light, but also absorbs and releases heat, potentially saving on energy costs. The researchers will present their results today at the American Chemical Society Spring 2019 National Meeting & Exposition. (2019-04-03)

New conversion process turns biomass 'waste' into lucrative chemical products
A new catalytic process is able to convert what was once considered biomass waste into lucrative chemical products that can be used in fragrances, flavorings or to create high-octane fuel for racecars and jets. A team of researchers from a DOE Energy Frontier Research Center has developed a process that uses a chemical catalyst and heat to spur reactions that convert lignin into valuable chemical commodities. (2014-12-17)

Spinning plant waste into carbon fiber for cars, planes
Using plants and trees to make products such as paper or ethanol leaves behind a residue called lignin. That leftover lignin isn't good for much and often gets burned or tossed into landfills. Now, researchers report transforming lignin into carbon fiber to produce a lower-cost material strong enough to build car or aircraft parts. The researchers are presenting their results at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-23)

New details of molecular machinery that builds plant cell wall components
In a new biochemical genetics study at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory, scientists reveal new details of the molecular machinery that helps channel carbon into a key cell-wall component. (2018-04-30)

Passive radiative cooling in delignified wood material
A newly engineered, wood-based material successfully reflects heat, or infrared radiation, and could cut the energy costs associated with cooling buildings by up to 50%, according to a modeling analysis of its application in 16 US cities. (2019-05-23)

Graphene on toast, anyone?
Rice University scientists who introduced laser-induced graphene have enhanced their technique to produce what may become a new class of edible electronics. (2018-02-13)

Novel genetic method improves efficiency of enzyme
Researchers at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the University of Georgia developed a new genetic engineering technique to dramatically improve an enzyme's ability to break down biomass. (2018-06-26)

Riding bacterium to the bank
Jet fuel, pantyhose and plastic soda bottles: all three could be made from bioengineered bacteria, as Sandia National Laboratories has now demonstrated. (2018-05-17)

'Electron shuttle' protein plays key role in plant cell-wall construction
Scientists studying plant cell walls have discovered details of a protein involved in the assembly of lignin, a key cell-wall component. The protein acts as a targeted 'electron shuttle,' delivering the 'fuel' that drives the construction of one specific lignin building block. Controlling the flow of electrons by modifying shuttle proteins could be a new strategy for guiding plants to make desired products. (2019-04-08)

Dead trees are alive with fungi
So far, little research has been conducted on fungi that live on dead trees, although they are vital to the forest ecology by breaking down dead wood and completing the element cycle between plants and soil. Soil biologists from the UFZ have now discovered that the number of fungus species inhabiting dead trees is 12 times higher than previously thought. Once trees die they are also colonized by different fungal communities depending on their species. (2018-01-09)

Billion-year revision of plant evolution timeline may stem from discovery of lignin in seaweed
Land plants' ability to sprout upward through the air, unsupported except by their own woody tissues, has long been considered one of the characteristics separating them from aquatic plants, which rely on water to support them. (2009-01-27)

Reactive lignin for reducing the environmental impacts of wood products
VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland has developed technology known as 'CatLignin' to produce reactive lignin from pulp industry side streams to be used as a replacement for toxic phenol compounds in wood adhesives that are widely used in wood products and furniture. (2017-02-14)

Surrounded by potential: New science in converting biomass
To take full advantage of biomass, lignin needs to be processed into usable components along with the plant cellulose. Currently, that process requires an acid plus high heat, or pyrolysis -- treating with high heat in the absence of oxygen. Besides being energy-consuming processing methods, the results are less than optimal. Ames Laboratory scientists are working to develop a method to deconstruct lignin in a way that is economically feasible and into stable, readily useful components. (2017-10-03)

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