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Popular Logging News and Current Events, Logging News Articles.
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Palm oil not the only driver of forest loss in Indonesia
Large-scale agriculture, primarily for growing oil palms, remains a major cause of deforestation in Indonesia but its impact has diminished in recent years as other natural and human causes emerge, a Duke University study finds. (2019-02-01)
New analysis shows damage to monarch butterfly colonies in 2016 storm worse than thought
A much greater number of monarch butterflies perished in a snowstorm in March 2016 in Mexico than previously estimated, according to new research. (2017-09-15)
Poor health literacy a public health issue
America's poor record on health literacy is a public health issue, but one that can be fixed -- not by logging onto the internet but by increased interaction with your fellow human beings, a Michigan State University researcher argues. (2016-10-13)
Mapping Biodiversity and Conservation Hotspots of the Amazon
Researchers have used remote sensing data to map out the functional diversity of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon basin, a technique that revealed hotspots for conservation. (2017-02-09)
'Keep it local' approach more effective than government schemes at protecting rainforest
Conservation initiatives led by local and indigenous groups can be just as effective as schemes led by government, according to new research. (2017-09-12)
Some patients stop needing antidepressant medication after having plastic surgery
It has been proven that plastic surgery can improve self-esteem, but can it also act as a natural mood enhancer? (2006-10-08)
Mapping biodiversity and conservation hotspots of the Amazon
Researchers have used remote sensing data to map out the functional diversity of the Peruvian Andes and Amazon basin, a technique that revealed hotspots for conservation. (2017-01-26)
Why conservation fails
The only way for northern countries to halt deforestation in the South is to make sure land owners are paid more than it costs them to conserve the forest. (2016-11-28)
Turtle nesting threatened by logging practices in Gabon, Smithsonian warns
Endangered sea turtles are victims of sloppy logging practices in the west central African country Gabon, according to a study led by William Laurance, staff scientist at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute. (2008-03-14)
Your wood stove affects the climate more than you might think
Heating with wood has a significant warming effect on the climate, which is cause for concern. (2018-04-03)
Fixing damaged ecosystems: How much does restoration help?
Billions of dollars are spent annually on repairing ecosystems damaged by people. (2018-03-01)
Newly discovered monkey is threatened with extinction
Just three years after it was discovered, a new species of monkey is threatened with extinction according to the Wildlife Conservation Society, which recently published the first-ever census of the endangered primate. (2008-07-28)
'Aquatic osteoporosis' jellifying lakes
North American lakes are suffering from declining calcium levels, says new research from Queen's University. (2014-11-19)
In 16 years, Borneo lost more than 100,000 orangutans
Over a 16-year period, about half of the orangutans living on the island of Borneo were lost as a result of changes in land cover. (2018-02-15)
Changing climate to bring more landslides on logged land, say WSU researchers
Washington State University researchers say landslides on logged forests will be more widespread as the Northwest climate changes. (2017-11-09)
Logging threatens breeding turtles
Debris from logging in tropical forests is threatening the survival of hatchling leatherback turtles and the success of mothers at one of the world's most important nesting sites in Colombia. (2017-04-10)
Payments to protect carbon stored in forests must increase to defend against rubber
Efforts to protect tropical forests in Southeast Asia for the carbon they store may fail because protection payments are too low. (2018-03-02)
Deep-ocean drilling researchers target earthquake and tsunami zone
Researchers fresh from an eight-week scientific drilling expedition off the Pacific coast of Japan today reported their discovery of strong variation in the tectonic stresses in a region notorious for generating devastating earthquakes and tsunamis, the Nankai Trough. (2007-12-12)
Long-term logging study demonstrates impacts on chimpanzees and gorillas (Republic of Congo)
Research has shown human disturbance can have detrimental effects on great ape populations but now, due to a study published in Biological Conservation on Nov. (2017-11-27)
Climate change causing more severe wildfires, larger insect outbreaks in temperate forests
A warmer, drier climate is expected is increase the likelihood of larger-scale forest disturbances such as wildfires, insect outbreaks, disease and drought, according to a new study co-authored by a Portland State University professor (2018-11-07)
Tree loss from bark-beetle infestation impacts elk habitat
Although elk typically adapt to forest disturbances such as forest fires and logging, a new Journal of Wildlife Management study found that during the summer, elk avoided areas with extensive tree mortality that has occurred due to the bark-beetle epidemic in the northern portions of the Rocky Mountains in the United States. (2019-02-06)
Jaguars and well-managed logging concessions can coexist, say conservationists
Logging activities in biodiverse forests can have a huge negative impact on wildlife, particularly large species such as big cats, but a new study proves that the Western Hemisphere's largest cat species--the jaguar (Panthera onca)--can do well in logging concessions that are properly managed, according to conservationists from the San Diego Zoo Global and the Bronx Zoo-based WCS (Wildlife Conservation Society). (2018-03-22)
Modern logging techniques benefit rainforest wildlife
New research has highlighted the value of a modern logging technique for maintaining biodiversity in tropical forests that are used for timber production. (2015-02-27)
Salvage logging is often a pretext for harvesting wood
An increasing proportion of the world's protected forests are subject to extensive logging activities. (2018-03-27)
Decades-past logging still threatens spotted owls in national forests
Logging of the largest trees in the Sierra Nevada's national forests ended in the early 1990s after agreements were struck to protect species' habitat. (2017-12-06)
An alternative to wolf control to save endangered caribou
The iconic woodland caribou across North America face increasing predation pressures from wolves. (2017-08-29)
The changing voices of North Atlantic right whales
Researchers have found that right whale calls, much like human voices, change as individuals age. (2018-03-12)
Wildfire management designed to protect Spotted Owls may be outdated
According to a new study, forest fires are not a serious threat to populations of Spotted Owls, a species that acts as an indicator of biological health to the old-growth forests where they live. (2018-07-24)
Ensuring the survival of elephants in Laos: A matter of economics
Asian elephant populations in Laos, which are under a process of commodification, have dropped by half in the last 30 years. (2017-11-01)
New hope for critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey
Scientists and conservation teams from Fauna & Flora International (FFI), Dali University and the German Primate Center just published a comprehensive conservation status review of one of the world's most threatened primate species, the critically endangered Myanmar snub-nosed monkey (also known affectionately as the 'snubby' by scientists, and as the black snub-nosed monkey in China), Rhinopithecus strykeri. (2018-01-16)
One in 5 adults secretly access their friends' Facebook accounts
Most people are concerned about the prospect of their social media accounts being hacked, but a new University of British Columbia study finds that it's actually people we know who frequently access our accounts without our permission. (2017-01-19)
Logging in tropical forests jeopardizing drinking water
A team of researchers from The University of Queensland (UQ), Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), and other groups have found that increasing land clearing for logging in Solomon Islands-even with best management strategies in place -- will lead to unsustainable levels of soil erosion and significant impacts to downstream water quality. (2018-04-16)
Saving gorillas, elephants starts with understanding their human neighbors
Understanding local human cultures is key to preserving gorillas, elephants and other wildlife in African parks and reserves, according to new research from Purdue University. (2010-01-13)
Small changes in rainforests cause big damage to fish ecosystems
Using lasers, researchers have connected, arranged and merged artificial cells, paving the way for networks of artificial cells acting as tissues. (2018-04-19)
Crowd-sourced data wins protection for endangered tricolored blackbird
Cornell University Lab of Ornithology fellow Orin Robinson used eBird data to convince California to list the Tricolored Blackbird as endangered. (2018-10-09)
Logged tropical rainforests still support biodiversity even when the heat is on
Tropical rainforests continue to buffer wildlife from extreme temperatures even after logging, a new study has revealed. (2017-10-19)
World's rarest ape on the edge of extinction
In a new research article, a team of international researchers argue that the Tapanuli orangutan -- a species discovered last year in Sumatra, Indonesia, and one of the rarest animals on the planet -- could lose its battle for survival, unless decisive steps are taken to rescue it. (2018-05-03)
When a tree lost is, or isn't, permanent deforestation: Mapping global forest loss
Despite numerous efforts by international governments, corporations and conservationists to reduce it, the overall rate of a permanent type of forest loss known as commodity-driven forest loss has not changed since 2001, a new map-based study reports. (2018-09-13)
Soil communities threatened by destruction, instability of Amazon forests
A meta-analysis of nearly 300 studies of soil biodiversity in Amazonian forests found that the abundance, biomass, richness and diversity of soil fauna and microbes were reduced following deforestation. (2019-05-24)
Survival of many of the world's nonhuman primates is in doubt, experts report
A report in the journal Science details the grim realities facing a majority of the nonhuman primates in the world -- the apes, monkeys, tarsiers, lemurs and lorises inhabiting ever-shrinking forests across the planet. (2017-01-18)
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