Popular Lung Function News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Lung Function News and Current Events, Lung Function News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
Declines in lung cancer death rates among US women have lagged in 2 hot spots
While lung cancer death rates among women in most of the United States have declined substantially in recent years, progress among women in a region covering central Appalachia and southern parts of the Midwest and in northern parts of the Midwest has lagged. (2018-03-30)

Air pollution is associated with cancer mortality beyond lung cancer
A large scale epidemiological study associates some air pollutants with kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer death. (2017-10-31)

Kidney disease biomarker may also be a marker for COPD
A commonly used biomarker of kidney disease may also indicate lung problems, particularly COPD, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2018-09-28)

Did prolonged breastfeeding reduce risk of asthma, atopic eczema in adolescents?
A breastfeeding program appeared to reduce the development of atopic eczema (an allergic skin response) but not asthma and lung function among children at age 16. (2017-11-13)

Respiratory tract infections in young children linked to asthma and worse lung function
Respiratory tract infections in young children are linked to an increased risk of asthma and worse lung function in later life, according to new research to be presented at the European Respiratory Society International Congress. An international study of 154,942 European children found a 1.5- to four-fold increased risk. (2017-09-09)

'Red tide toxins' leave beachgoers breathless
A new study in the January 2007 issue of the journal CHEST shows that the ecological phenomenon, known as Florida red tide, can be harmful for people with asthma. (2007-01-08)

Exploring 'clinical conundrum' of asthma-COPD overlap in nonsmokers with chronic asthma
Researchers may be closer to finding the mechanism responsible for loss of lung elastic recoil and airflow limitation in nonsmokers with chronic asthma. The study published today in the journal CHEST Unraveling the Pathophysiology of the Asthma-COPD Overlap Syndrome reported that both nonsmokers and smokers with chronic asthma share features of COPD. This conundrum, often referred to as asthma-COPD overlap syndrome, has been assumed to be due to large and especially small airway remodeling. (2015-08-05)

Proposed cancer treatment may boost lung cancer stem cells, study warns
Epigenetic therapies -- targeting enzymes that alter what genes are turned on or off in a cell -- are of growing interest in the cancer field as a way of making a cancer less aggressive or less malignant. Researchers at Boston Children's Hospital now report that at least one epigenetic therapy that initially looked promising for lung cancer actually has the opposite effect, boosting cancer stem cells that are believed to drive tumors. (2018-11-19)

How bone cells promote lung cancer growth
A certain type of cell in the bone marrow can help promote tumor growth in mice with early stage lung cancer, a new study finds. (2017-11-30)

Single steroid-bronchodilator treatment for control and rescue improves persistent asthma
When it comes to treating teens and adults with persistent asthma, using a single corticosteroid and long-acting bronchodilator treatment for both daily asthma control and for rescue relief during sudden asthma attacks is more effective than taking separate medications for daily control and rescue, according to an analysis led by University of Connecticut researchers. (2018-03-19)

Entrectinib effective, well-tolerated against ROS1 and NTRK lung cancers, especially with brain metastases
Pooled analysis of three phase 1 and 2 clinical trials show that the drug entrectinib is effective and well-tolerated against advanced ROS1 and NTRK fusion-positive non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). (2019-12-13)

Children's Hospital scientists identify possible target for prevention and treatment of pneumonia
Researchers at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC have identified a key protein target that may be a crucial factor in the development of a vaccine to prevent and new therapies to treat pneumonia, the leading killer of children worldwide. (2008-02-11)

No adverse health impacts from long term vaping -- Study
A new peer-reviewed clinical trial to be published in the February edition of Regulatory Toxicology and Pharmacology shows that regular use of e-cigarettes does not have any negative health impact on smokers. (2018-01-17)

Endobronchial valve treatment appears to improve lung function in patients with severe emphysema
People with severe emphysema may breathe better after a minimally invasive procedure that places valves in the airways leading to diseased portions of their lungs, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2017-09-08)

Lung cancer triggers pulmonary hypertension
Nearly half of all advanced-stage lung cancer patients develop arterial pulmonary hypertension. (2017-11-22)

Scientists developing way to help premature babies breathe easier
Researchers suggest a possible cell-based therapy to stimulate lung development in fragile premature infants who suffer from a rare condition called Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia (BPD), which in the most severe cases can lead to lifelong breathing problems and even death. Scientists report in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine they studied genetic signatures in donated human neonatal lungs by using single-cell RNA sequencing analysis and mouse models of BPD. (2019-06-26)

Researchers demonstrate RAS dimers are essential for cancer
Researchers at UT Southwestern's Simmons Cancer Center have shown that RAS molecules act in pairs, known as dimers, to cause cancer, findings that could help guide them to a treatment. (2018-01-11)

Release of the cancer incidence and survival statistics for Northern Ireland 2012-2016
The Queen's University N. Ireland Cancer Registry (NICR) today released the number of new cancer cases diagnosed (incidence) in Northern Ireland in 2016. (2018-03-22)

Cancer mortality in the US continues decades-long drop
The cancer death rate dropped 1.7 percent from 2014 to 2015, continuing a drop that began in 1991 and has reached 26 percent, resulting in nearly 2.4 million fewer cancer deaths during that time. (2018-01-04)

Video plus brochure helps patients make lung cancer scan decision
A short video describing the potential benefits and risks of low-dose CT screening for lung cancer in addition to an informational brochure increased patients' knowledge and reduced conflicted feelings about whether to undergo the scan more than the informational brochure alone, according to a randomized, controlled trial published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2019-04-19)

How the power of mathematics can help assess lung function
Researchers at the University of Southampton have developed a new computational way of analyzing X-ray images of lungs, which could herald a breakthrough in the diagnosis and assessment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and other lung diseases. (2018-05-10)

Certain factors may predict lung cancer patients' response to chemotherapy
In a retrospective analysis of 73 lung squamous cell carcinoma patients treated with the chemotherapy regimen of gemcitabine plus cisplatin, higher body mass index and younger age were linked with longer progression-free survival, the length of time that a patient lives with cancer but it does not get worse. Patients with better response to treatment and higher body mass index had longer overall survival in the Thoracic Cancer analysis. (2018-01-10)

Scientists find new evidence about how to prevent worsening pneumonia
Sodium channels in the cells that line the tiny capillaries in our lungs play an important role in keeping those capillaries from leaking and potentially worsening conditions like pneumonia, scientists report. (2017-09-05)

New approach uses ultrasound to measure fluid in the lungs
A team of engineering and medical researchers has found a way to use ultrasound to monitor fluid levels in the lung, offering a noninvasive way to track progress in treating pulmonary edema -- fluid in the lungs -- which often occurs in patients with congestive heart failure. The approach, which has been demonstrated in rats, also holds promise for diagnosing scarring, or fibrosis, in the lung. (2017-03-21)

New research suggests a simple blood test could improve the early detection of lung cancer
New research led by scientists at the MRC Toxicology Unit suggests that by analysing levels of DNA in the blood, the early detection of lung cancer could be improved. The study, published in the journal Disease Models and Mechanisms, found that in preliminary tests using mice, a blood test could measure the circulating levels of DNA in the blood which cancer cells shed as they grow and multiply, and could even predict the presence of tumours in the lungs before they became cancerous. (2019-02-12)

Childhood aggression linked to deficits in executive function
Researchers find that primary school children with reduced cognitive skills for planning and self-restraint are more likely to show increased aggression in middle childhood. The study examined the relationship between aggression and executive function -- a measure of cognitive skills that allow a person to achieve goals by controlling their behavior. The results suggest that helping children to increase their executive function could reduce their aggression. (2018-03-15)

People born premature have smaller airways causing respiratory problems
People born prematurely may have smaller airways than those born at full term, which can cause respiratory problems. That's according to research published in Experimental Physiology today. (2017-11-29)

Distorted view amongst smokers of when deadly damage caused by smoking will
Smokers have a distorted perception on when the onset of smoking-related conditions will occur, a new study in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology reports. (2018-01-18)

Scientists discover how cigarette smoke causes cancer: Study points to new treatments, safer tobacco
Everyone has known for decades that that smoking can kill, but until now no one really understood how cigarette smoke causes healthy lung cells to become cancerous. In a research report published in the March print issue of The FASEB Journal, researchers show that hydrogen peroxide (or similar oxidants) in cigarette smoke is the culprit. This finding may help the tobacco industry develop (2008-02-28)

Reprogrammed blood vessels promote cancer spread
Tumor cells use the bloodstream to spread in the body. To reach the blood, they first have to pass the wall of the vessel. Scientists from the German Cancer Research Center have now identified a trick that the cancer cells use: They activate a cellular signal in the vessel lining cells. This makes the passage easier and promotes metastasis. In experiments with mice, the researchers were able to block this process using antibodies. (2017-03-03)

Racial disparities in asthma related to health care access, environmental factors
In the United States, racial disparities in asthma prevalence, morbidity and mortality can largely be explained by looking at socioeconomic and environmental factors, such as access to healthcare. The findings highlight the potential of targeted interventions, such as mobile asthma clinic programs and joint programs with schools where asthma prevalence is high. (2019-01-11)

Expert panel issues new guidelines for lung cancer molecular testing
Guidelines add ROS1 to list of tests matching lung cancer with targeted treatments, among other updated recommendations. (2018-01-30)

Women who clean at home or work face increased lung function decline
Women who work as cleaners or regularly use cleaning sprays or other cleaning products at home appear to experience a greater decline in lung function over time than women who do not clean, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2018-02-16)

Smokers often misunderstand health risks of smokeless tobacco product, Rutgers study finds
American smokers mistakenly think that using snus, a type of moist snuff smokeless tobacco product, is as dangerous as smoking tobacco, according to a Rutgers study. The study provides new research on what smokers think about snus, a Swedish style product that is popular in Scandinavia, but newer to the United States. (2019-03-04)

New research shows diabetes and worse blood sugar control are associated with long-term cognitive decline
A new study in Diabetologia of some 5,000 older people in the UK has shown that rates of long-term cognitive decline are steeper in those who have diabetes compared with people with normal blood sugar control, and that efforts to delay the onset of diabetes and/or control blood sugar levels might prevent subsequent progression of brain function decline. (2018-01-25)

Secretome of pleural effusions associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and malignant meso
Cryopreserved cell-free PE fluid from 101 NSCLC patients, 8 mesothelioma and 13 with benign PE was assayed for a panel of 40 cytokines/chemokines using the Luminex system. (2019-11-05)

Smoking may lead to heart failure by thickening the heart wall
Smokers without obvious signs of heart disease were more likely than nonsmokers and former smokers to have thickened heart walls and reduced heart pumping ability. The longer and more cigarettes people smoked, the greater the damage to their hearts' structure and function. Heart measures in former smokers were similar to nonsmokers, suggesting that quitting may reverse tobacco-related damage. (2016-09-13)

CNIO researchers cure lung fibrosis in mice with a gene therapy that lengthens telomeres
Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a potentially lethal disease associated with the presence of critically short telomeres, currently lacking effective treatment. The Telomere and Telomerase Group at the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre (CNIO) has succeeded in curing this disease in mice using a gene therapy that lengthens the telomeres. This work constitutes a (2018-01-30)

Antibodies as 'messengers' in the nervous system
Antibodies are able to activate human nerve cells within milliseconds and hence modify their function -- that is the surprising conclusion of a study carried out at Human Biology at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). This knowledge improves our understanding of illnesses that accompany certain types of cancer, above all severe intestinal malfunctions. (2017-01-27)

Study identifies new molecular target for treating deadly lung disease IPF
Scientists searching for a therapy to stop the deadly and mostly untreatable lung disease, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), found a new molecular target that slows or stops the illness in preclinical laboratory tests. Researchers at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center report their data in the journal Cell Reports. Studying mice with IPF and donated human cells, they identify a gene called FOXF1 that inhibits the IPF disease process. (2018-04-10)

Page 2 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.