Popular Macrophages News and Current Events

Popular Macrophages News and Current Events, Macrophages News Articles.
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Scientists identify potential contributor to hyper immune responses in patients with severe COVID-19
Researchers have pinpointed a helper T cell population in the lungs of patients with severe COVID-19 that may be central to the development of hyperinflammation, lung injury, and subsequent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) during disease (2021-02-23)

Rheumatoid arthritis meets precision medicine
Scientists are bringing precision medicine to rheumatoid arthritis for the first time by using genetic profiling of joint tissue to see which drugs will work for which patients, reports a new multi-site study. In the near future, patients won't have to waste time and be disappointed with months of ineffective therapy, scientists said. Currently $2.5 billion a year is wasted on therapy that doesn't work. (2018-03-19)

Effective material developed to prevent post-surgical adhesion
In a paper published in TECHNOLOGY, a group of researchers have investigated a novel Polyelectrolyte complex (PEC) that provides a barrier to prevent adhesions in post-operative complications. This has the potential to avoid the need for a second surgery to remove the adhesions. (2018-08-14)

Zinc could help as non-antibiotic treatment for UTIs
New details about the role of zinc in our immune system could help the development of new non-antibiotic treatment strategies for bacterial diseases, such as urinary tract infections (UTIs). UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections worldwide and can lead to serious conditions such as kidney infection and sepsis. A team of researchers examined how our immune system uses zinc to fight uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) -- the major cause of UTIs. (2019-03-08)

Mysterious vaping illness characterized by fat-laden cells in the lung
University of Utah Health investigators have identified a previously unrecognized characteristic of the vaping-related respiratory illness that has been emerging in clusters across the US in recent months. Within these patients' lungs are large immune cells containing numerous oily droplets, called lipid-laden macrophages. The finding may allow doctors to definitively diagnose the nascent syndrome more quickly and could provide clues into causes of the condition. The research publishes in the New England Journal of Medicine. (2019-09-06)

New drug lead identified in fight against TB
Antibacterial compounds found in soil could spell the beginnings of a new, much-needed treatment for tuberculosis, new research led by the University of Sydney has found. tuberculosis (TB) causes more deaths than any other infectious disease including HIV/AIDs. In 2015 there were an estimated 10.4 million new cases of TB and 1.4 million deaths from the disease. (2017-03-01)

Multiple sclerosis: Cholesterol crystals prevent regeneration in central nervous system
Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which the immune cells attack myelin sheaths. Regeneration of myelin sheaths is necessary for patients to recover from MS relapses. Nevertheless, the ability to regenerate decreases with age. A team from Technical University Munich has published an explanation in (2018-01-04)

Blood stored longer may be less safe for patients with massive blood loss and shock
In a collaborative study using a mouse model, researchers have found mechanistic links between older stored red blood cell transfusions and subsequent bacterial pneumonia. This may reveal new approaches to improve safety of stored red blood cell transfusions. The key player is free heme, a breakdown product from degraded red blood cells (2018-03-09)

Specific protein plays key role in the spread of breast cancer
Researchers from the University of Liverpool have found an explanation for how breast cancer spreads to the lungs, which could potentially hold the key to preventing the progression of the disease. (2018-01-25)

Radiation therapy, macrophages improve efficacy of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapy
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators report finding finding how appropriately timed radiation therapy can significantly improve the delivery of cancer nanomedicines by attracting macrophages to tumor blood vessels, which results in a transient 'burst' of nanoencapsulated drugs from capillaries into the tumor. (2017-05-31)

Inflammation in regeneration: A friend or foe?
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have discovered a novel mechanism linking inflammation and organ regeneration in fish, which can be conserved among vertebrates. (2017-03-06)

Gut check: Metabolites shed by intestinal microbiota keep inflammation at bay
Researchers have elucidated a mechanism by which 'good' bacteria that reside in our gastrointestinal tract can help protect us from inflammation, and how their disruption (dysbiosis) can increase the susceptibility of the liver to more harmful forms of disease. Their study, now available in the journal Cell Reports, identified two key metabolites produced by the bacteria in mice that modulate inflammation in the host and could ultimately reduce the severity of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. (2018-05-04)

Tumor-dwelling immune cells thwart cancer immunotherapy
Researchers have caught tumor-associated immune cells called macrophages in the act of stealing checkpoint inhibitor antibodies away from their intended T cell targets, and blocking this thievery led to improved therapeutic responses in tumor-bearing mice. (2017-05-10)

Adaptive human immunity depends on the factor responsible for the formation of white blood cells
Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF)has a significant regulatory effect not only on innate, but also on adaptive immunity. That's what scientists from the IKBFU and Research Institute of Fundamental and Clinical Immunology have found. (2019-10-31)

Texas A&M-led collaborative study takes aim at non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
Texas A&M University System researchers in collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs and Baylor Scott & White Research Institute have completed a study identifying one of the mechanisms leading to the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, or NAFLD, providing new possibilities for prevention and treatment of the disease. (2018-02-26)

Diabetic foot ulcers heal quickly with nitric oxide technology
Around the world, 425 million people live with diabetes and upwards of 15 percent develop foot ulcers, which increases their risk of death 2.5 times. A new nitric oxide-releasing technology has the potential to cut down the healing time of diabetic foot ulcers from 120 days to 21 days. (2018-11-13)

HIV RNA expression inhibitors may restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals
Immune activation and inflammation persist in the majority of treated HIV-infected individuals and is associated with excess risk of mortality and morbidity. A new study by Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) researchers suggests that use of HIV RNA expression inhibitors as adjunct therapy might diminish atypical inflammation and restore immune function in HIV-infected individuals on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). (2018-08-27)

Another piece of Ebola virus puzzle identified
A team of researchers have discovered the interaction between an Ebola virus protein and a protein in human cells that may be an important key to unlocking the pathway of replication of the killer disease in human hosts. Scientists at Texas Biomedical Research Institute were part of a nationwide collaborative with scientists at Gladstone Institutes, UC San Francisco and Georgia State University for a study recently published in the journal Cell. (2019-01-17)

Chronic inflammation plays critical role in sustained delivery of new MD therapy
Macrophages, a type of white blood cell involved in inflammation, readily take up a newly approved medication for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and promote its sustained delivery to regenerating muscle fibers long after the drug has disappeared from circulation, an experimental model study finds. (2017-10-16)

SWAT team of immune cells found in mother's milk
Immune cells that are ready to take action against invaders like bacteria have been found in women's breast milk, researchers say. (2018-05-03)

New biomarkers of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease targeting the brain. The pathogenesis of MS remains largely unknown. It is believed that brain tissue damage is due to immune cells targeting and breaking up the myelin basic protein (MBP), which is essential for nerve cells function. (2017-05-19)

Making fat mice lean: Novel immune cells control neurons responsible for fat breakdown
The biological causes underlying obesity have been under intense scrutiny with studies suggesting a link between the nervous and the immune systems. Now, in a breakthrough study to be published in Nature Medicine on Oct. 9, a research team led by Ana Domingos, from Instituto Gulbenkian de Ciência, discovered an unforeseen population of immune cells associated with neurons that play a direct role in obesity. (2017-10-09)

Study explores emerging role of NAD+ in innate and adaptive immune responses
Researchers at Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) have discovered a new cellular and molecular pathway that regulates CD4+ T cell response -- a finding that may lead to new ways to treat diseases that result from alterations in these cells. (2018-02-23)

Team IDs weakness in anthrax bacteria
MIT and New York University researchers have identified a weakness in the defenses of the anthrax bacterium that could be exploited to produce new antibiotics. (2008-01-24)

Immune cell target that may prevent or delay heart failure after pressure overload
Researchers have identified a therapeutic target to prevent or delay heart failure from pressure overload of the heart, and a potential biomarker for the same. They say their animal studies carry clinical and translational potential. Mouse-model experiments showed that preventing the early infiltration of CCR2+ macrophages into the heart, after experimental pressure overload, significantly lessened the heart's enlargement and reduced pumping ability that leads to later heart failure. (2018-03-19)

Macular degeneration linked to aging immune cells
Studying mice and cells from patients, vision researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that as immune cells called macrophages get older, they are more likely to contribute to inflammation and abnormal blood vessel growth in the back of the eye. This can damage vision in patients with age-related macular degeneration. (2018-04-05)

How tumor necrosis factor protects against infection
Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a messenger substance in the immune system, plays an important role in triggering chronic inflammatory diseases. For this reason, TNF inhibitors are a standard form of treatment for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and certain inflammatory bowel diseases. However, TNF also protects against infection, which means that inhibiting it can cause latent infections to resurface. Researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg have now discovered a new mechanism via which TNF protects against intracellular pathogens that cause infection. (2016-07-11)

Turning off asthma attacks
Working with human immune cells in the laboratory, Johns Hopkins researchers report they have identified a critical cellular 'off' switch for the inflammatory immune response that contributes to lung-constricting asthma attacks. The switch, they say, is composed of regulatory proteins that control an immune signaling pathway in cells. (2016-12-02)

Smart molecules trigger white blood cells to become better cancer-eating machines
A team of researchers has engineered smart protein molecules that can reprogram white blood cells to ignore a self-defense signaling mechanism that cancer cells use to survive and spread in the body. Researchers say the advance could lead to a new method of re-engineering immune cells to fight cancer and infectious diseases. The team successfully tested this method in a live cell culture system. (2017-09-28)

The subcellular dynamics of RNA stabilizing molecule in response to inflammation
A research group at Osaka University revealed the regulatory mechanism of subcellular localization of Arid5a in response to inflammation. It has been known that an inflammatory accelerator is localized in the nucleus, and an inflammatory brake is localized in the cytoplasm. (2018-02-01)

Time to put TB on a diet!
The tuberculosis bacillus is growing resistant to antibiotics. For this reason, biochemists at UNIGE are attempting to identify the mechanisms that enable the bacterium to reproduce, spread and survive in latent form in our macrophages. The scientists have discovered that the bacterium has the ability to 'reprogram' the cell it infects so that it can feed on its lipids. This results will pave the way for treatment opportunities based on starving and weakening the bacterium. (2017-01-19)

Cardiac macrophages found to contribute to a currently untreatable type of heart failure
A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has discovered, for the first time, that the immune cells called macrophages contribute to a type of heart failure for which there currently is no effective treatment. (2018-02-14)

Monash discovery uncovers clue to disarm gonorrhea superbug
Monash University researchers have discovered a way the gonorrhea bacteria cleverly evade the immune system -- opening up the way for therapies that prevent this process, allowing the body's natural defenses to kill the bug. (2018-03-30)

Every meal triggers inflammation
When we eat, we do not just take in nutrients -- we also consume a significant quantity of bacteria. The body is faced with the challenge of simultaneously distributing the ingested glucose and fighting these bacteria. This triggers an inflammatory response that activates the immune systems of healthy individuals and has a protective effect, as doctors from the University and the University Hospital Basel have proven for the first time. In overweight individuals, however, this inflammatory response fails so dramatically that it can lead to diabetes. (2017-01-16)

Vitamin D and immune cells stimulate bone marrow disease
The bone marrow disease myelofibrosis is stimulated by excessive signaling from vitamin D and immune cells known as macrophages, reveals a Japanese research team. These findings could help to develop alternative treatments that do not target problem genes. The findings were published on Feb. 4 in the online edition of Blood. (2019-02-08)

How tuberculosis hides in the body
The tuberculosis vaccine only works for children. BCG (bacille Calmette-Guerin) doesn't protect you as an adult. Now we know more about how the bacterium avoids being detected, which is an important step towards better treatment. (2017-09-28)

Novel PET imaging method more fully evaluates extent of rheumatoid arthritis inflammation
A new positron emission tomography (PET) imaging method more fully evaluates the extent of rheumatoid arthritis by targeting translocator protein (TSPO) expression in the synovium (joint lining tissue). The study is featured in the July issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2018-07-09)

How tattoos are maintained by macrophages could be key to improving their removal
Researchers in France have discovered that, though a tattoo may be forever, the skin cells that carry the tattoo pigment are not. Instead, the researchers say, the cells can pass on the pigment to new cells when they die. The study, which will be published March 6 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests ways to improve the ability of laser surgery to remove unwanted tattoos. (2018-03-06)

Mouse healing may reveal targets to delay or prevent human heart failure
In a study of mouse healing after severe heart attacks, which may reveal therapeutic targets that can help humans avoid or delay heart failure, researchers looked at the heart and spleen over time and measured the types and numbers of immune cells involved; the types and amounts of lipid signaling compounds produced; the expression of the enzymes that produce those signaling compounds; and which enzymes are key to resolution of inflammation. (2018-03-06)

A link between mitochondrial damage and osteoporosis
In healthy people, a tightly controlled process balances out the activity of osteoblasts, which build bone, and osteoclasts, which break it down. Damage to cells' mitochondria can make that process go awry, according to research led by University of Pennsylvania researchers. The findings shed light on how exposure to cigarette smoke, alcohol, and certain medications and environmental toxins can raise the risk of osteoporosis. (2019-05-09)

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