Popular Magnetic Fields News and Current Events

Popular Magnetic Fields News and Current Events, Magnetic Fields News Articles.
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Weyl goes chiral
Quasiparticles that behave like massless fermions, known as Weyl fermions, have been in recent years at the center of a string of exciting findings in condensed matter physics. The group of physicist Sebastian Huber at ETH Zurich now reports experiments in which they got a handle on one of the defining properties of Weyl fermions -- their chirality. (2019-02-11)

Spintronics: New production method makes crystalline microstructures universally usable
New storage and information technology requires new higher performance materials. One of these materials is yttrium iron garnet, which has special magnetic properties. Thanks to a new process, it can now be transferred to any material. Developed by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the method could advance the production of smaller, faster and more energy-efficient components for data storage and information processing. The physicists have published their results in the journal ''Applied Physics Letters''. (2021-02-23)

Algorithm accurately predicts how electromagnetic waves and magnetic materials interact
UCLA Samueli engineers have developed a new tool to model how magnetic materials, which are used in smartphones and other communications devices, interact with incoming radio signals that carry data. It accurately predicts these interactions down to the nanometer scales required to build state-of-the-art communications technologies. (2018-09-10)

Agile underwater glider could quietly survey the seas
Autonomous underwater vehicles have become versatile tools for exploring the seas. But they can be disruptive to the environment or have trouble traveling through confined spaces. Purdue University researchers are studying an alternative: highly maneuverable, low-cost underwater gliders that operate silently. (2021-02-23)

Nano-layer of ruthenium stabilizes magnetic sensors
A layer of ruthenium just a few atoms thick can be used to fine-tune the sensitivity and enhance the reliability of magnetic sensors, tests at NIST show. The nonmagnetic metal acts as a buffer between active layers of sensor materials, offering a simple means of customizing field instruments such as compasses and stabilizing the magnetization in a given direction in devices such as computer hard-disk readers. (2007-08-03)

The magic angle of twisted graphene
Trapped tightly between two monolayers of carbon superimposed at a precise angle, electrons interact and can produce superconductivity. This is what UCLouvain's researchers reveal in an article published in Nature. This property allows electric power to circulate without any resistivity, without energy lost, within the nanostructure. (2021-02-23)

A look into the fourth dimension
In our daily experience space has three dimensions. Recently, however, a physical phenomenon that only occurs in four spatial dimensions could be observed in two experiments. The theoretical groundwork for those experiments was laid by an ETH researcher. (2018-01-04)

Scientists predict the areas of the brain to stimulate transitions between different brain states
Using a computer model of the brain, Gustavo Deco, director of the Center for Brain and Cognition, and Josephine Cruzat, a member of his team, together with a group of international collaborators, have developed an innovative method published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Sept. 3. (2019-10-03)

Noninvasive stimulation device can help prevent migraine attacks
A migraine is much more than just a bad headache. Migraine symptoms, which can be debilitating for many people, are the sixth leading cause of disability, according to the World Health Organization. (2018-03-28)

Brightest neutron star yet has a multipolar magnetic field
Scientists have identified a neutron star that is consuming material so fast it emits more x-rays than any other. Its extreme brightness can only be explained if the star has a complex multipolar magnetic field, the researchers say. (2017-02-21)

What did Earth's ancient magnetic field look like?
New work from Carnegie's Peter Driscoll suggests Earth's ancient magnetic field was significantly different than the present day field, originating from several poles rather than the familiar two. Then, shortly after our planet's core solidified, Driscoll's work predicts that Earth's magnetic field transitioned to a 'strong,' two-pole one. (2016-06-24)

Researchers create 'MRI' of the sun's interior motions
A team of scientists has created an (2012-07-09)

High-precision magnetic field sensing
Scientists have developed a highly sensitive sensor to detect tiny changes in strong magnetic fields. The sensor may find widespread use in medicine and other areas. (2016-12-02)

Confirmation of Wendelstein 7-X magnetic field
Physicist Sam Lazerson of the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory has teamed with German scientists to confirm that the Wendelstein 7-X fusion energy device called a stellarator in Greifswald, Germany, produces high-quality magnetic fields that are consistent with their complex design. (2016-12-05)

Optical magnetic field sensor can detect signals from the nervous system
The human body is controlled by electrical impulses in the brain, the heart and nervous system. These electrical signals create tiny magnetic fields, which doctors could use to diagnose various diseases, for example diseases of the brain or heart problems in young fetuses. Researchers from the Niels Bohr Institute have now succeeded in developing a method for extremely precise measurements of such ultra-small magnetic fields with an optical magnetic field sensor. The results are published in the scientific journal, Scientific Reports. (2016-07-15)

Just what sustains Earth's magnetic field anyway?
Earth's magnetic field shields us from deadly cosmic radiation, and without it, life as we know it could not exist here. The motion of liquid iron in the planet's outer core, a phenomenon called a 'geodynamo,' generates the field. But how it was first created and then sustained throughout Earth's history has remained a mystery to scientists. New work sheds light on the history of this incredibly important geologic occurrence. (2016-06-01)

Understanding stars: How tornado-shaped flow in a dynamo strengthens the magnetic field
A new simulation based on the von-Kármán-Sodium (VKS) dynamo experiment takes a closer look at how the liquid vortex created by the device generates a magnetic field. Researchers investigated the effects of fluid resistivity and turbulence on the collimation of the magnetic field, where the vortex becomes a focused stream. They report their findings this week in the journal Physics of Fluids. (2017-05-23)

Neuroimaging categorizes 4 depression subtypes
Patients with depression can be categorized into four unique subtypes defined by distinct patterns of abnormal connectivity in the brain, according to new research from Weill Cornell Medicine. (2016-12-08)

Research pioneers
Five UC Santa Barbara professors join the ranks as Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) for 2018. Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers for 'their efforts toward advancing science applications that are deemed scientifically or socially distinguished.' (2018-11-27)

Observations of red aurora over 1770 Kyoto help diagnose extreme magnetic storm
Researchers used historic accounts of a rare red aurora over Kyoto, Japan, in the 18th century to support calculations of the strength of the associated magnetic storm. The September 1770 storm could be 3-10% stronger than the September 1859 storm, the greatest storm in the past 200 years. The research provides insights that could assist preparation for an unlikely, but possible, future intense magnetic storm. (2017-10-03)

2D topological physics from shaking a 1D wire
Published in Physical Review X, this new study propose a realistic scheme to observe a 'cold-atomic quantum Hall effect.' (2019-10-03)

Engineering academic elected a Fellow of the IEEE
A University of Bristol academic has been elected a Fellow of the world's largest and most prestigious professional association for the advancement of technology. (2015-12-01)

Exercise does not seem to increase bone marrow edema in healthy people
A recent study published in Rheumatology finds that osteitis/bone marrow edema as measured by magnetic resonance imaging was present in healthy people. However, it did not increase significantly due to intense physical activity. (2017-12-14)

Solar minimum surprisingly constant
Using more than half a century of observations, Japanese astronomers have discovered that the microwaves coming from the Sun at the minimums of the past five solar cycles have been the same each time, despite large differences in the maximums of the cycles. This is an important step in understanding the creation and amplification of solar magnetic fields, which generate sunspots and other solar activity. (2017-11-16)

'Pulling' bacteria out of blood
Magnets instead of antibiotics could provide a possible new treatment method for blood infection. This involves the blood of patients being mixed with magnetic iron particles, which bind the bacteria to them after which they are removed from the blood using magnets. The initial laboratory tests at Empa in St. Gallen have been successful, and seem promising. (2016-12-07)

Multiresponsive nanosurfactant constructs tiny chemical factory
IBS scientists have made a surfactant based on nanoparticle dimers, which is responsive to multiple stimuli. The nanosurfactant combines several characteristics of each 'active' molecular surfactant which allows a tremendous flexibility whereby liquid droplets can be manipulated. (2018-01-10)

Brain scans show why people get aggressive after a drink or two
Researchers have used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans that measure blood flow in the brain to better understand why people often become aggressive and violent after drinking alcohol. After only two drinks, the researchers noted changes in the working of the prefrontal cortex of the brain, the part normally involved in tempering a person's levels of aggression. (2018-02-12)

The atomic dynamics of rare everlasting electric fields
Researchers have discovered the atomic mechanisms that give the unusual material yttrium manganite its rare magnetic and electric properties. All it took was ricocheting neutrons off the atoms of a sample of the material heated to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit. (2018-01-10)

Diamonds coupled using quantum physics
Researchers at TU Wien have succeeded in coupling the specific defects in two such diamonds with one another. This is an important prerequisite for the development of new applications, such as highly sensitive sensors and switches for quantum computers. (2017-04-10)

Molecular memory can be used to increase the memory capacity of hard disks
Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä have taken part in an international British-Finnish-Chinese collaboration where the first molecule capable of remembering the direction of a magnetic above liquid nitrogen temperatures has been prepared and characterized. The results may be used in the future to massively increase the storage capacity of hard disks without increasing their physical size. (2018-10-18)

New properties of sulfur atom discovered
2019 will be, as proclaimed by the UN, the 'International Year of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements', in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of its creation. Researchers from the Faculty of Science of the University of Malaga (UMA) have recently revealed new properties of one of its key elements: sulfur. (2018-12-14)

NMRCloudQ: A quantum cloud experience on a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum computer
Cloud-based quantum computing is the most useful form for public users to experience with the power of quantum. Recently, a joint team led by G. Long at Tsinghua University, B. Zeng at University of Guelph and D. Lu at SUSTech launched a new cloud quantum computing service-NMRCloudQ which is based on 4-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance and aims to be freely accessible to either amateurs that keep pace with quantum era or professionals that want explore quantum phenomena. (2018-01-19)

IU-led study finds neurotransmitter may play a role in alcohol relapse, addiction
Indiana University researchers scanned the brains of individuals with alcohol abuse disorder and found that the neurotransmitter glutamate may play a role in some addition cravings. (2018-02-12)

Magneto-inertial fusion experiment nears completion
The Plasma Liner Experiment will soon test the potential for a novel plasma fusion concept, while offering insights into the physics of colliding plasma jets. (2019-10-21)

Researchers unlocking potential for next-generation medical scanning
While still in the early stages, research reported today in the journal Science Advances has made significant steps towards a new MRI method with the potential to enable doctors to personalise life-saving medical treatments and allow real-time imaging to take place in locations such as operating theatres and GP practices. (2018-01-05)

A mechanical way to stimulate neurons
Magnetic nanodiscs can be activated by an external magnetic field, providing a research tool for studying neural responses. (2020-07-20)

Targeting depression: Researchers ID symptom-specific targets for treatment of depression
For the first time, physician-scientists at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center have identified two clusters of depressive symptoms that responded to two distinct neuroanatomical treatment targets in patients who underwent transcranial magnetic brain stimulation (TMS) for treatment of depression. The team's findings shed new light on the brain circuitry underlying specific symptoms of depression and may facilitate personalized TMS therapy for depression and other psychiatric or neurological disorders. (2020-05-04)

New UC Riverside research advances spintronics technology
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called 'spintronic' devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics. (2018-02-01)

Designing diamonds for medical imaging technologies
Japanese researchers have optimized the design of laboratory-grown, synthetic diamonds. This brings the new technology one step closer to enhancing biosensing applications, such as magnetic brain imaging. The advantages of this layered, sandwichlike, diamond structure are described in a recent issue of Applied Physics Letters. (2018-03-19)

Soft magnetic material characterizations get a harder look
In motors, generators and similar electric machines, the electrical current that powers them generates magnetic fields that magnetize some of the metallic components. Choosing the right magnetic material is crucial for designing efficient machines, so researchers analyzed the existing system for characterizing soft magnetic materials. To identify a better system, they looked at several factors that can affect the uncertainty inherent in the measurement of magnetic properties. Their results are in this week's AIP Advances. (2017-11-14)

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