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Popular Magnetic Fields News and Current Events, Magnetic Fields News Articles.
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Magnetic pumping pushes plasma particles to high energies
The solar wind is not a calm summer breeze. Instead, it is a roiling, chaotic mess of turbulence and waves. There is a lot of energy stored in this turbulence, so scientists have long thought that it heats the solar wind. However, the heating expected from turbulence is not the heating observed. Scientists at the University of Wisconsin -- Madison have a new idea about what heats the solar wind, a theory called magnetic pumping. (2018-11-05)

Cardiac MRI may lead to targeted PAH therapy
Patients at greatest risk of dying from pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) may be identified through cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and the information the noninvasive scan provides about the functional level of the heart's right ventricle. (2019-05-20)

Ultra-soft, liquid magnetic droplets could vault technology forward
Most magnets are rigid but have made great contributions to society and to modern industry, says Thomas Russell of UMass Amherst. But this award-winning innovator dreamed of more -- what if magnets could be soft and flowable as liquid to conform to a limited space? In Science this week, he and Xubo Liu from Beijing University of Chemical Technology, others at Berkeley National Lab and UC Berkeley, report on a simple way to transform paramagnetic ferrofluids -- plain metal particles in suspension -- into a magnetic state. (2019-07-18)

Magnetic whirls in future data storage devices
Magnetic (anti)skyrmions are microscopically small whirls that are found in special classes of magnetic materials. They could be used to host digital data. A team of scientists from the Max Planck institutes (MPI) of Microstructure Physics in Halle and for Chemical Physics of Solids in Dresden and the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) has now made the observation that skyrmions and antiskyrmions can coexist bringing about the possibility to expand their capabilities in storage devices. (2020-03-03)

Missing link found between turbulence in collapsing star and hypernova, gamma-ray burst
Extremely bright supernovas, called hypernovae, have been linked to gamma-ray bursts, but theorists have struggled to explain how a collapsing massive star could produce a magnetic field a million billion times greater than that of the sun, which is necessary to blow off the outer portions of the star and accelerate charged particles to speeds needed to produce gamma rays. A new supercomputer simulation by UC Bereley and Caltech scientists shows how this happens (2015-11-30)

Researchers discover method to objectively identify PTSD
Researchers at the University of Minnesota and Minneapolis VA Medical Center have identified a biological marker in the brains of those exhibiting post-traumatic stress disorder. (2010-01-20)

Quantum cocktail provides insights on memory control
Experiments based on atoms in a shaken artificial crystal made of light offer novel insight into the physics of quantum many-body systems -- which might help in the development of future data-storage technologies. (2018-01-24)

Chemists characterize the fatal fungus among us
Life-threatening fungal infections affect more than two million people worldwide. Effective antifungal medications are limited. A major challenge is that the fungal cell wall is poorly understood, which has impeded drug development. However, a chemist has identified for the first time the cell wall structure of one of the most prevalent and deadly fungi, which could usher in a new era of antifungal drug development to help save lives. (2018-07-19)

2D magnetism reaches a new milestone
Researchers at the IBS Center for Correlated Electron Systems, in collaboration with Sogang University and Seoul National University, reported the first experimental observation of a XY-type antiferromagnetic material, whose magnetic order becomes unstable when it is reduced to one-atom thickness. Published in Nature Communications, these findings are consistent with theoretical predictions dating back to the 1970s. (2019-01-22)

Spin devices rev up
Electric currents drive all our electronic devices. The emerging field of spintronics looks to replace electric currents with what are known as spin currents. Researchers from the University of Tokyo have made a breakthrough in this area. Their discovery of the magnetic spin Hall effect could lead to low-power, high-speed and high-capacity devices. They have created sample devices which can further research into potential applications. (2019-03-05)

Suspended layers make a special superconductor
In superconducting materials, an electric current will flow without any resistance. There are quite a few practical applications of this phenomenon; however, many fundamental questions remain as yet unanswered. Associate Professor Justin Ye, head of the Device Physics of Complex Materials group at the University of Groningen, studied superconductivity in a double layer of molybdenum disulfide and discovered new superconducting states. The results were published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology on November 4, 2019. (2019-11-04)

Magnets for the second dimension
ETH Zurich scientists have developed cube-shaped magnetic building blocks that can be assembled into two-dimensional shapes and controlled by an external magnetic field. They can be used for soft robotics applications. (2019-11-11)

Ultrafast electrons in magnetic oxides: A new direction for spintronics?
Special metal oxides could one day replace semiconductor materials that are commonly used today in processors. Now, for the first time, an international team of researchers from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), the University of Kaiserslautern and the University of Fribourg in Switzerland was able to observe how electronic charge excitation changes electron spin in metal oxides in an ultrafast and inphase manner. The study was published in the journal ''Nature Communications''. (2020-08-19)

RUDN University chemists developed new magnetic and luminescent lanthanide-siloxane-based compounds
A team of chemists from RUDN University synthesized new organosilicon compounds containing terbium and europium ions. These complexes have an unusual cage-like crystal structure that contains four metal ions. The team was the first to study the magnetic and photophysical properties of such compounds and to observe their magnetic phase transition and luminescence properties. (2020-11-03)

Novel public-private partnership facilitates development of fusion energy
PPPL working in coordination with MIT's Plasma Science and Fusion Center and Commonwealth Fusion Systems to develop a unique tokamak fusion device called ''SPARC.'' (2020-12-30)

Neutrons tap into magnetism in topological insulators at high temperatures
Researchers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology and their collaborators used neutron scattering to reveal magnetic moments in hybrid topological insulator materials at room temperature, hundreds of degrees Fahrenheit warmer than the extreme sub-zero cold where the properties are expected to occur. The discovery promises new opportunities for next-generation electronic and spintronic devices such as improved transistors and quantum computing technologies. (2016-05-09)

Theorists propose conditions needed to search for new form of matter
A pair of physicists provides a theoretical roadmap that could point to the discovery of an exotic magnetically ordered state of matter dubbed a 'chiral spin liquid.' (2017-12-18)

Harnessing sperm to treat gynecological diseases
Delivering drugs specifically to cancer cells is one approach researchers are taking to minimize treatment side effects. Stem cells, bacteria and other carriers have been tested as tiny delivery vehicles. Now a new potential drug carrier to treat gynecological conditions has joined the fleet: sperm. Scientists report in the journal ACS Nano that they have exploited the swimming power of sperm to ferry a cancer drug directly to a cervical tumor in lab tests. (2017-12-20)

Energy-efficient spin current can be controlled by magnetic field and temperature
Up to now, electronic computer components have been run on electricity, generating unwanted heat. If spin current were employed instead, computers and similar devices could be operated in a much more energy-efficient manner. Researchers have now discovered an effect that could make such a transition to spin current a reality. (2018-08-17)

Laboratory experiments probe the formation of stars and planets
The cosmos is a void dotted with stars and an ever-increasing number of newly-observed planets beyond our solar system. Yet, how these stars and planets formed out of clouds of interstellar dust and gas remains mysterious. The study of black holes provides clues that could help solve this mystery. (2018-11-05)

Scientists develop new, faster method for seeking out dark matter
For nearly a century, scientists have worked to unravel the mystery of dark matter. Now, a team of researchers are dramatically speeding up the search for one candidate for this elusive substance called the axion. (2021-02-10)

3-D cell culture: Making cells feel right at home
Research in this week's Nature Nanotechnology takes aim at a biological icon: the two-dimensional petri dish. Scientists from Rice University and the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center have found a simple way to suspend cells in magnetic fields so they grow into three-dimensional cell cultures. Compared with flat cell cultures, the 3-D cell cultures more closely resemble real tissues from the body and should provide more realistic targets for testing new drugs. (2010-03-15)

A stellar achievement: Magnetized space winds in the laboratory
New insights have been gained about stellar winds, streams of high-speed charged particles called plasma that blow through interstellar space. These winds, created by eruptions from stars or stellar explosions, carry with them strong magnetic fields which can interact with or effect other magnetic fields, such as those that surround planets like Earth. To understand these processes, researchers are employing laboratory experiments to study magnetic flows up close. (2018-11-05)

Electrified magnets: researchers uncover a new way to handle data
The properties of synthesised magnets can be changed and controlled by charge currents as suggested by a study and simulations conducted by physicists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Central South University in China. In the journal 'Nature Communications', the team reports on how magnets and magnetic signals can be coupled more effectively and steered by electric fields. This could result in new, environmentally friendly concepts for efficient communication and data processing. (2020-11-09)

Penn engineers' 'photonic doping' makes class of metamaterials easier to fabricate
By carefully combining multiple structures, metamaterials can exhibit properties that don't naturally exist. Penn Engineering's Nader Engheta has a new, simpler way of making them, using a concept dubbed 'photonic doping.' (2017-03-09)

Star with different internal driving force than the sun
A star like the sun has an internal driving in the form of a magnetic field that can be seen on the surface as sunspots. Now astrophysicists from the Niels Bohr Institute have observed a distant star in the constellation Andromeda with a different positioning of sunspots and this indicates a magnetic field that is driven by completely different internal dynamics. The results are published in the scientific journal, Nature. (2016-05-04)

Perspectives on magnetic reconnection
Article describes latest research on magnetic reconnection. (2016-12-08)

Next-generation optics offer the widest real-time views of vast regions of the sun
A groundbreaking new optical device, developed at NJIT's Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) to correct images of the Sun distorted by multiple layers of atmospheric turbulence, is providing scientists with the most precisely detailed, real-time pictures to date of solar activity occurring across vast stretches of the star's surface. (2017-01-10)

Solar storms trigger Jupiter's 'Northern Lights'
Solar storms trigger Jupiter's intense 'Northern Lights' by generating a new X-ray aurora that is eight times brighter than normal and hundreds of times more energetic than Earth's aurora borealis, finds new UCL-led research using NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory. (2016-03-22)

On the road to creating an electrodeless spacecraft propulsion engine
Experiments by researchers give clues about the behavior of plasma in different environments. (2017-07-04)

Why is massive star formation quenched in galaxy centers?
A study led by IAC researcher Fatemeh Tabatabaei, published in Nature Astronomy, proposes that one of the reasons that slows down the rate at which massive stars form in galaxies is the existence of relatively large magnetic fields. Research has revealed that this process occurs around the center of the galaxy NGC 1097. (2017-11-28)

New experimental results from the largest and most sophisticated stellerator
An international team is running tests on the largest and most sophisticated stellerator, the Wendelstein 7-X fusion experiment. This complex machine is housed at the Max-Planck-Institute of Plasma Physics, and researchers are analyzing data from the first experiment campaign that took place in 2016, hoping to understand the science of fusion reactors. In Physics of Plasmas, the scientists recount the first detailed characterization of plasma turbulence at the outer edge of the stellerator. (2018-07-03)

Enhancing memory network via brain stimulation
Magnetic stimulation of the posterior parietal cortex increases functional connectivity of a neural network implicated in memory, shows human research published in eNeuro. This finding confirms a previous study, validating further exploration of this technique for experimental and clinical applications. (2019-10-10)

NYU Abu Dhabi researcher discovers exoplanets can be made less habitable by stars' flares
In this new study, NYUAD Center for Space Science Research Scientist Dimitra Atri found that not all exoplanets in habitable zones will be able to maintain hospitable conditions for life. Exoplanets in close proximity to stars are subject to radiation bursts which can disrupt habitable conditions unless the exoplanet has significant atmospheric or magnetic shielding. (2019-12-15)

Scientists explain the paradox of quantum forces in nanodevices
Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). Researchers proposed a new approach to describe the interaction of metals with electromagnetic fluctuations (i.e., with random bursts of electric and magnetic fields). (2020-10-27)

Satellites help discover a jet stream in the Earth's core
A jet stream within the Earth's molten iron core has been discovered by scientists using the latest satellite data that helps create an 'X-ray' view of the planet. (2016-12-19)

Learning and memory may play a central role in synesthesia
People with color-grapheme synesthesia experience color when viewing written letters or numerals, usually with a particular color evoked by each grapheme (i.e., the letter 'A' evokes the color red). In a new study, researchers present data from 11 color grapheme synesthetes who had startlingly similar color-letter pairings that were traceable to childhood toys containing magnetic colored letters. (2013-01-23)

Pesticide exposure causes bumblebee flight to fall short
Bees exposed to a neonicotinoid pesticide fly only a third of the distance that unexposed bees are able to achieve. Flight behavior is crucial for determining how bees forage, so reduced flight performance from pesticide exposure could lead to colonies going hungry and pollination services being impacted. (2019-04-29)

Magnetics with a twist: Scientists find new way to image spins
Cornell researchers have put a new spin on measuring and controlling spins in nickel oxide, with an eye toward improving electronic devices' speed and memory capacity. (2019-10-22)

New TMS clinic offers noninvasive treatment for major depression
Rush University Medical Center has opened the Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Clinic to offer patients suffering from major depression a safe, effective, nondrug treatment. TMS therapy is the first FDA-approved, noninvasive antidepressant device-based treatment clinically proven for treatment of depression. Psychiatrists at Rush University Medical Center were among the first to test the technique and Dr. Philip Janicak, professor of psychiatry and lead investigator at Rush for the clinical trials of TMS, helped to develop this therapy. (2009-11-05)

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