Popular Male Infertility News and Current Events

Popular Male Infertility News and Current Events, Male Infertility News Articles.
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Choosy amphipods
Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. This behavior requires a lot of time and energy, so that the males make their choice with care. Scientists at Goethe University have now investigated under which circumstances males are prepared to revise their decision. (2019-02-07)

On your bike?
A James Cook University researcher says a lack of suitable roads is a big reason why cycling participation rates in Australia and Queensland are so low. (2019-06-13)

Buzzkill?
They say love is blind, but if you're a queen honeybee it could mean true loss of sight. New research from UC Riverside finds male honeybees inject toxins during sex that cause temporary blindness. (2019-09-10)

Female mammals follow their noses to the right mates
Historically, most examples of female mate choice and its evolutionary consequences are found in birds. But that doesn't mean mammals aren't just as choosy, researchers say. It just means that mammal mate preferences may be harder to spot. (2009-03-17)

Hormone can enhance brain activity associated with love and sex
The hormone kisspeptin can enhance activity in brain regions associated with sexual arousal and romantic love, according to new research. (2017-01-23)

A deep male voice helps women remember
Men take note: If you want women to remember, speak to them in a low pitch voice. Then, they may rate you as a potential mate. That's according to a new study by scientists from the University of Aberdeen, UK. Their work shows for the first time that a low masculine voice is important for both mate choice and the accuracy of women's memory. The research is published online in Springer's journal, Memory & Cognition. (2011-09-12)

Scientists in New York City discover a valuable method to track rats
A new paper in The Journal of Urban Ecology, published by Oxford University Press, finds that rats can be baited to, or repelled from, locations using pheromones found in the scents of other rats. (2019-09-17)

Typical male brain anatomy associated with higher probability of autism spectrum disorder
A study of high-functioning adults with autism spectrum disorder suggests that characteristically male brain anatomy was associated with increased probability of ASD, according to a new article published online by JAMA Psychiatry. (2017-02-08)

New methods find undiagnosed genetic diseases in electronic health records
Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center have found a way to search genetic data in electronic health records to identify undiagnosed genetic diseases in large populations so treatments can be tailored to the actual cause of the illness. (2018-03-15)

Autism's gender patterns
Having one child with autism is a well-known risk factor for having another one with the same disorder, but whether and how a sibling's gender influences this risk has remained largely unknown. Now new research led by scientists at Harvard Medical School has for the first time successfully quantified the likelihood that a family who has one child with autism would have another one with the same disorder based on the siblings' gender. (2017-09-25)

One in 4 women at sexual health clinics reports coercion over their reproductive lives
As many as one in four women attending sexual and reproductive healthcare services say they are not allowed to take control of their own reproductive lives, reveals a review of the available evidence, published today in BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. (2019-01-07)

In mice, cadmium exposure during pregnancy linked to obesity in female offspring
In a mouse study aimed at modeling human exposure to the toxic metal cadmium, researchers found that female offspring of mice exposed to cadmium during pregnancy became obese in adulthood, developed fatty livers and could not process glucose normally. Male offspring were not affected in the same way. The study also sheds light on how cadmium exposure could affect mitochondrial function and developmental signaling pathways in the liver. (2020-11-12)

African-Americans still disproportionately affected by HIV
African-Americans are still much more likely to be diagnosed with HIV than white Americans. A new paper on the HIV/AIDS epidemic in the African-American community shows that despite recent drops in HIV diagnoses across every population in the US, there are still great disparities between ethnic groups. The paper was led by Cato T. Laurencin of the University of Connecticut in the US and is published in Springer's Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities. (2018-06-05)

Inherent feminizing effect of germ cells: New insights into sex determination
Germ cells have long been recognized as the only cells that can transfer genetic materials to the next generation via the sperm or egg. However, recent analyses in medaka (teleost fish) revealed another essential role of germ cells -- feminizing the gonads. Researchers showed the feminizing effect of germ cells occurs in parallel with other reproductive elements. Germ cells in medaka may have a potential to feminize gonads at the moment they have developed. (2018-03-29)

Scientists penalized by motherhood
Despite gender balance at lower levels of academia, challenges still exist for women progressing to more senior roles. This research challenges to what extent a motherhood penalty could be at play. (2018-03-29)

The reasons that university students do sport
The research shows that female students do it for health reason and male students do it for social relationships that are involved in doing sport. Among those who had stopped doing or never done sport, a lack of time was the main reason. (2018-02-14)

Asthma linked to infertility but not among women taking regular asthma preventers
Women with asthma who only use short-acting asthma relievers take longer to become pregnant than other women, according to research published in the European Respiratory Journal. (2018-02-14)

New study published on fertility awareness among American university students
A groundbreaking study lead by Chapman University professor Brennan Peterson, Ph.D. on fertility awareness of American college students will be published in the May 5 edition of Human Reproduction -- a top-tier international journal in reproductive biology. It is the first such study on fertility awareness among American undergraduate university students. and the results show the awareness of the impact of age on fertility among American college students is low. (2012-05-07)

Lab-grown eggs could pave way towards new fertility treatments
Human eggs have been developed in the lab from their earliest stage to full maturity, in a study that could lead to improved fertility treatments. (2018-02-08)

Women who eat fast food take longer to become pregnant
Women who eat less fruit and more fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, according to a study by researchers at the University of Adelaide's Robinson Research Institute. (2018-05-03)

UMD researcher discovers mechanisms and epigenetic markers with implications for diseases ranging from cancers to infertility
A UMD researcher uncovered new mechanisms that dictate the development of germline stem cells. Mechanisms were found to be associated with genes responsible for cancers and viral infections among other major diseases. Markers used to identify male germ cells were discovered, exploring how environmental factors or epigenetics affect these cells and providing significant insight into treatments for male infertility. Findings set the stage for chickens as a more prominent model organism for stem cell research. (2018-04-30)

Bonobos share and share alike
Bonobos are willing to share meat with animals outside their own family groups. This behavior was observed in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and is documented in a new study in Springer's journal Human Nature. (2018-04-05)

Do women with epilepsy have similar likelihood of pregnancy?
Women with epilepsy without a history of infertility or related disorders who wanted to become pregnant were about as likely as their peers without epilepsy to become pregnant. In an observational study of 89 women with epilepsy and 108 without, 60.7 percent of the women with epilepsy achieved pregnancy compared with 60.2 percent of women without epilepsy. They also had similar pregnancy outcomes with regard to live births and low rates of miscarriages. (2018-04-30)

Air pollution linked to irregular menstrual cycles
The air your teenage daughter breathes may be causing irregular menstrual cycles. Well documented negative health effects from air pollution exposure include infertility, metabolic syndrome and polycystic ovary syndrome. This study is the first to show that exposure to air pollution among teen girls (ages 14-18) is associated with slightly increased chances of menstrual irregularity and longer time to achieve such regularity in high school and early adulthood. (2018-01-25)

Workplace sexism's effects on women's mental health and job satisfaction
A new Journal of Applied Social Psychology study investigates the associations between workplace sexism, sense of belonging at work, mental health, and job satisfaction for women in male-dominated industries. (2019-02-06)

Release of the cancer incidence and survival statistics for Northern Ireland 2012-2016
The Queen's University N. Ireland Cancer Registry (NICR) today released the number of new cancer cases diagnosed (incidence) in Northern Ireland in 2016. (2018-03-22)

Physical activity can lead to difference in diet preferences between males, females
Recent studies have shown that approximately 90 percent of adult Americans fail to reach the US Department of Health guidelines for physical activity, which could be contributing to surging obesity rates. Now, new research by a multidisciplinary team of University of Missouri researchers suggests that physical activity can change diet preferences in males, but not in females -- an area that researchers say has not been thoroughly studied. (2017-09-05)

Frogs reveal mechanism that determines viability of hybrids
Why are some hybrids viable and others not? It is known that this depends on the father species and the mother species. New research in two related frog species shows the influence of mother and father species: one hybrid is viable, the other hybrid dies in early stages of development. Scientists from Radboud University, together with colleagues from the United States and Japan, publish their findings on 10 January in Nature. (2018-01-10)

Penis development needs more than just testes and testosterone
Proper development of the fetal penis requires not just testosterone from the testes, but a second hormone produced by other tissues, including the placenta, according to a new study publishing Feb. 14 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology from Paul Fowler of the University of Aberdeen, Michelle Bellingham of the University of Glasgow, and colleagues in the UK, France and Sweden. The results reveal a previously unknown pathway of masculinization of the external genitals. (2019-02-14)

Treatment for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients
Treatments for the anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis usually include steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab, cyclophosphamide and tumor resection. The researchers aimed to compare the efficacy of the treatments including intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange, plasmapheresis, rituximab or cyclophosphamide for male anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis patients without tumor and to discuss potential biomarkers for this disease. (2018-03-14)

Selection and reselection processes of executive political positions are gender biased
Although male over-representation in politics is a worldwide phenomenon, the executive is the most male-dominated branch. There have been very few women presidents and prime ministers. The figure has stagnated since 1990 at twenty female national leaders per year. In recent years their presence has even decreased: in December 2017 there were only thirteen female leaders of their respective country. (2019-01-11)

Common bacterium may help control disease-bearing mosquitoes
Genes from a common bacterium can be harnessed to sterilize male insects, a tool that can potentially control populations of both disease-bearing mosquitoes and agricultural pests, researchers at Yale University and Vanderbilt University report in related studies published Feb. 27 in two Nature journals. (2017-02-27)

Pre-pregnancy progesterone helps women with recurrent pregnancy loss
Women who have had two or more unexplained miscarriages can benefit from natural progesterone treatment before pregnancy, a new a study from the University of Illinois at Chicago shows. The researchers found that natural progesterone, administered vaginally, led to a higher birth rate. Over two-thirds of pregnancies were successful in women who received progesterone, compared to barely half in women who did not receive the hormone. (2017-01-09)

Life-history traits may affect DNA mutation rates in males more than in females
Large-scale DNA sequencing data have been used to investigate a long-standing evolutionary assumption -- that DNA mutation rates are influenced by such life-history traits as the time between an individual's birth and the birth of its offspring. One of the implications of this research is that life-history traits of extinct species now could be discoverable. (2011-06-13)

Women may be at higher risk for sports-related concussion than men
Women athletes are 50 percent more likely than male athletes to have a sports-related concussion, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. (2017-02-28)

Study shows race, not experience, impacts hiring in sports world
If you want to get your foot in the door of the sports industry, your race may mean more than your experience. That's the major result of a new study from North Carolina State University that examined hiring decisions for entry-level sports management positions. (2010-07-07)

Color vision variation in guppies influences female mate preference
A variety of animals have male-specific ornament traits and these ornaments are favored by female choice. Which male traits are preferred by females often varies among females. Genetic mechanisms that create and maintain variations in female preference has been one of the central questions in evolutionary ecology. (2018-11-19)

Fertility rates no different for women with epilepsy
'Myth-busting' study among women with no history of infertility finds that those with epilepsy are just as likely to become pregnant as those without. (2018-04-30)

Researchers discover that female cats are more likely to be right-handed
Researchers at Queen's University Belfast have found that female cats are much more likely to use their right paw than males. (2018-01-22)

Holding on to patriarchy-reinforcing beliefs comes at a price
Some men categorize women into two groups: either they are chaste, nurturing and good, or they are promiscuous, manipulative, and out to seduce them. This polarizing 'Madonna-Whore dichotomy' is grounded in a man's desire to reinforce male dominance, and not only relates to attitudes that restrict a woman's autonomy, but also impairs intimate relationships between men and women. (2018-02-02)

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