Popular Male Infertility News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Male Infertility News and Current Events, Male Infertility News Articles.
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Holding on to patriarchy-reinforcing beliefs comes at a price
Some men categorize women into two groups: either they are chaste, nurturing and good, or they are promiscuous, manipulative, and out to seduce them. This polarizing 'Madonna-Whore dichotomy' is grounded in a man's desire to reinforce male dominance, and not only relates to attitudes that restrict a woman's autonomy, but also impairs intimate relationships between men and women. (2018-02-02)

Biodiversity: All the colors of the rainbow
Madagascar is a chameleon paradise. A team of researchers has now discovered three new species, among them a beautifully colored rainbow chameleon. These species are all restricted to very small ranges, and are probably highly threatened. (2018-04-11)

Estrogen is important for bone health in men as well as women
Although women are four times more likely than men to develop osteoporosis, or porous bone, one in 12 men also suffer from the disease, which can lead to debilitating fractures. In women, low estrogen levels after menopause have been considered an important risk factor for this disorder. Now research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis has shown that low amounts of active estrogen metabolites also can increase the risk of osteoporosis in men. (2007-05-10)

Frozen embryos result in just as many live births in IVF
Freezing and subsequent transfer of embryos gives infertile couples just as much of a chance of having a child as using fresh embryos for in vitro fertilization (IVF), research from Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, and Adelaide, Australia has found. (2018-01-10)

Research reveals that wealth may drive preference for short-term relationships
According to new research by psychologists at Swansea University, resource-rich environments may cause people to favor short-term relationships. (2018-01-16)

In drawing tests, US children draw female scientists more today than in previous decades
The participation of women in science has risen significantly in the United States since the 1960s. A new meta-analysis reviewed five decades of 'Draw a Scientist' tests to determine whether children's drawings have mirrored that change. The study found that US children and adolescents today draw female scientists more often than in earlier decades, but overall, female scientists are still depicted much less frequently than males in children's and youths' drawings. (2018-03-20)

Study suggests ways to close CEO pay gap
Recent research from UT Dallas' Naveen Jindal School of Management examines how cultural perceptions affect the compensation of female CEOs in China, where women CEOs earn significantly less than their male counterparts. (2018-04-12)

Study: Site of 1st chlamydia exposure makes big difference
Exposing the gut to chlamydia protects against subsequent infection in the genital tract and other tissues, researchers from UT Health San Antonio discovered. Chlamydia is the nation's most common sexually transmitted disease and causes infertility, ectopic pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease if left untreated. (2018-01-26)

Bedside art therapy decreases pain and anxiety in patients with cancer
A brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improved mood and reduced pain and anxiety in a study of inpatients with hematological cancers. (2018-04-19)

Mate or hibernate? That's the question worm pheromones answer
Scientists from the University of Florida, Cornell University, the California Institute of Technology and the US Department of Agriculture have discovered the first mating pheromone in one of science's most well-studied research subjects, the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans. But perhaps even more interesting is what the newly discovered pheromone also directs worms to do -- hibernate. (2008-07-24)

Researchers find new treatment for Chlamydia
Researchers at the University of Waterloo have developed a new way to prevent and treat Chlamydia, the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection in the world. (2019-02-06)

Dancing backwards in high heels
Who do students turn to when they want to ask for an extended assignment deadline or an increase in their marks? Most likely their female professors, says Amani El-Alayli of the Eastern Washington University in the US. El-Alayli is lead author of an article in Springer's journal Sex Roles which investigates the added work demands often faced by women in academia. (2018-01-03)

Horrific mating strategy appears to benefit both male and female redback spiders
A mating strategy among redback spiders where males seek out immature females appears to benefit both sexes, a new U of T Scarborough study has found. (2017-12-14)

Scientists map monogamy, jealousy in the monkey mind
A recent study at the California National Primate Research Center studied jealousy in pair-bonded titi monkeys. The study was part of a larger study examining the neurobiology of pair-bonded primate species. (2017-10-19)

Female sex offenders often have mental problems
Women who commit sexual offenses are just as likely to have mental problems or drug addictions as other violent female criminals. This according to the largest study ever conducted of women convicted of sexual offenses in Sweden. (2008-05-14)

BU: Marijuana use does not lower chances of getting pregnant
Marijuana use -- by either men or women -- does not appear to lower a couple's chances of getting pregnant, according to a new study led by Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) researchers. (2018-01-22)

Mediterranean diet may help women receiving IVF to achieve successful pregnancies
New research has found that women who follow a 'Mediterranean' diet in the six months before assisted reproductive treatment have a significantly better chance of becoming pregnant and giving birth to a live baby than women who did not. The study is published in Human Reproduction. (2018-01-29)

Bringing water to the fountain of youth
A new study of the European common frog, Rana temporaria, published in the advanced online edition of the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution, offers some fresh clues that challenge the conventional scientific wisdom on sex-chromosome evolution. (2018-01-30)

Researchers identify personality traits
Researchers from Boston University School of Medicine's New England Centenarian Study have noted specific personality traits associated with healthy aging and longevity amongst the children of centenarians. The work was conducted in collaboration with scientists from the National Institute on Aging. These findings currently appear online in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2009-04-03)

High GPA could work against young women job hunters
Stellar grades in college could hurt -- rather than help -- women new to the job market, according to a new study that suggests employers place more value on the perceived 'likability' of female applicants than on their academic success. (2018-03-22)

Web-based program may help address underage drinking
A new study supports the use of a brief, web-based program alone and in combination with a parent campaign for preventing alcohol consumption among adolescents transitioning from middle school to high school. (2018-04-05)

Large-scale study links PCOS to mental health disorders
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common hormone condition among young women, are prone to mental health disorders, and their children face an increased risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD), according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2018-04-10)

Bones show prehistoric women's intensive manual labor during advent of agriculture
Comparisons of bone strength between prehistoric women and living female athletes demonstrate that prehistoric women performed rigorous manual labor for thousands of years in central Europe at levels exceeding those of modern women. (2017-11-29)

Study reveals complex biology, gender differences, in kidney cancer
A new study is believed to be the first to describe the unique role of androgens in kidney cancer, and it suggests that a new approach to treatment, targeting the androgen receptor (AR), is worth further investigation. The study shows that in renal cell carcinoma androgen signaling can either stimulate or suppress tumor cells' movement and invasion to different locations in the body. (2017-10-13)

New health insurance benefit at U-M led to increased rates of IVF
In a new research letter appearing in JAMA detailing a first-of-its-kind study, a University of Michigan team compared the use of IVF among university employees before and after the addition of an insurance coverage benefit, finding a marked increase in the rate of use. (2019-11-13)

Dietary restriction and life span in male and hermaphrodite worms
An organism's lifespan is known to be affected by its sex and diet, but where these two factors overlap biologically is not well understood. Researchers in Japan looked for clues in worms that have two sexes: hermaphrodite or male. They found that hermaphrodite worms can live over two weeks longer when put on various forms of dietary restriction, whereas male worms show no change in lifespan.The work appears December 26 in Cell Reports. (2017-12-26)

Dimethandrolone undecanoate shows promise as a male birth control pill
A new birth control pill for men appears to be safe when used daily for a month, with hormone responses consistent with effective contraception, study researchers say. Their study results, in 83 men, will be presented Sunday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Sex and aggression controlled separately in female animal brains, but overlap in male brains
Brain structures that control sexual and aggressive behavior in mice are wired differently in females than in males. (2017-09-18)

Male fruit flies can smell a good mate based on her metabolism
A female fruit fly must balance her energy usage between making eggs now and storing nutrients for later. This balance affects the pheromones that she produces and impacts whether male fruit flies find her attractive, report Tatyana Fedina of the University of Michigan and colleagues, Aug. 17, 2017 in PLOS Genetics. (2017-08-17)

University of Guelph researchers discover why females have heart health advantage
University of Guelph Prof. Tami Martino has revealed in a first-ever study the biological reasons why females have a heart health advantage over men and it's tied to ovarian hormones. Essentially the interplay between female ovarian hormones and a circadian 'clock' molecule protects the heart health of women until they reach menopause. (2017-10-04)

Biomarkers indicating diminished reserve of eggs not associated with reduced fertility
Among women of older reproductive age attempting to conceive naturally, biomarkers indicating diminished ovarian reserve compared with normal ovarian reserve were not associated with reduced fertility, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-10-10)

These ring-tailed lemurs raise a 'stink' when they flirt with potential mates
Stink-flirting among ring-tailed lemurs come at a cost, but may also influence females in choosing a mate. (2017-11-17)

Metformin lowers risk of late miscarriage, preterm birth in pregnant women with PCOS
The oral diabetes medication metformin seems to reduce the chance of a late miscarriage and premature birth among women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) but does not affect their rate of developing gestational diabetes, a multicenter study finds. The results were presented Tuesday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-20)

Culture affects how teen girls see harassment
Teenage girls of all ethnic and socioeconomic backgrounds still experience sexism and sexual harassment -- but cultural factors may control whether they perceive sexism as an environmental problem or as evidence of their own shortcomings. (2008-05-15)

Most patients comfortable with sexual orientation and gender identity questions
New Mayo Clinic research suggests up to 97 percent of patients are comfortable with their health care provider asking sexual orientation and gender identity questions. Before this research, it was unclear if the questions - which researchers say are important to reduce health disparities among LGBTI patients -- would offend patients. The findings were published today in Health Services Research. (2018-03-09)

Biology study suggests father's nutrition before sex could contribute to health of baby
Doctors long have stressed the importance of good nutrition for expectant mothers. Now biologists at the University of Cincinnati say the father's diet, too, could play a similar role in the health of a baby. (2017-10-12)

New study points to agriculture in frog sexual abnormalities
A farm irrigation canal would seem a healthier place for toads than a ditch by a supermarket parking lot. But University of Florida scientists have found the opposite is true. In a study with wide implications for a longstanding debate over whether agricultural chemicals pose a threat to amphibians, UF zoologists have found that toads in suburban areas are less likely to suffer from reproductive system abnormalities than toads near farms -- where some had both testes and ovaries (2008-07-03)

Worm species lost 7,000 genes after evolving to fertilize itself
Reproduction in most animal species requires breeding between two individuals. But some worms have evolved the ability to go it alone. In these species, a single individual can breed with itself to produce offspring. A new University of Maryland-led study found that gaining this ability, known as 'selfing,' may have caused a worm species to lose a quarter of its genome, including genes that give male sperm a competitive edge during mating. (2018-01-04)

Three proteins may play key roles in female fertility and cancer biology
Three proteins regulate each other with surprising twists and turns in female mouse eggs, a finding that may play an important role in female fertility and cancer biology, according to Rutgers-led research. (2018-10-25)

Women who eat fast food and little or no fruit take longer to become pregnant
Women who eat less fruit and more fast food take longer to get pregnant and are less likely to conceive within a year, according to a study published in Human Reproduction, one of the world's leading reproductive medicine journals. (2018-05-03)

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