Popular Maple Syrup News and Current Events

Popular Maple Syrup News and Current Events, Maple Syrup News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 11 | 430 Results
Wood ash recycling program could help save Muskoka's forests and lakes
Implementing a new residential wood ash recycling program to restore calcium levels in Muskoka's forest soils and lakes could help replenish the area's dwindling supply of crayfish and maple sap, according to new research co-led by York University. (2019-03-28)

Writing the future of rewritable memory
Scientists at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada have created the most dense, solid-state memory in history that could soon exceed the capabilities of current hard drives by 1,000 times. New technique leads to the densest solid-state memory ever created. (2018-07-23)

How a protein could become the next big sweetener
High-fructose corn syrup and sugar are on the outs with calorie-wary consumers. As a result, low- and no-calorie alternatives have become popular, and soon, there could be another option that tastes more sugar-like than other substitutes. Scientists report in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry a step toward commercial production of a fruit protein called brazzein that is far sweeter than sugar -- and has fewer calories. (2016-08-17)

Laser evaporation technology to create new solar materials
Researchers use lasers to blast solutions containing delicate organic compounds to grow new types of crystals for solar cells, light-emitting diodes and photodetectors. (2018-01-03)

A dolphin diet
The health of dolphin populations worldwide depends on sustained access to robust food sources. (2017-08-02)

Brain's 'sixth sense' for calories discovered
The brain can sense the calories in food, independent of the taste mechanism, researchers have found in studies with mice. Their finding that the brain's reward system is switched on by this (2008-03-26)

Unusual thermal convection in a well-mixed fluid: Can a syrup separate when mixed?
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University, have recently discovered unusual thermal convection in a uniform mixture of high and low viscosity liquids. Kobayashi and Kurita found that concentration fluctuations are enhanced by thermal convection when the two liquids have a large viscosity difference. Such mixtures are ubiquitously observed in nature, daily life, and manufacturing processes, e.g. mantle convection, syrup, polymer products. These results promise further insight into non-equilibrium phenomena in fluid mixtures with contrasting 'thickness.' (2017-12-15)

UH Seidman Cancer Center performs first-ever prostate cancer treatment
The radiation oncology team at UH Seidman Cancer Center in Cleveland performed the first-ever prostate cancer treatment April 3 using a newly-approved device -- SpaceOAR which enhances the efficacy of radiation treatment by protecting organs surrounding the prostate. 'Shielding the rectum from radiation allows us to increase the radiation dose used to kill cancerous cells in the prostate,' said Rodney Ellis, M.D., radiation oncologist. 'SpaceOAR represents a significant development in prostate cancer radiotherapy.' (2015-04-15)

Infants who ate rice, rice products had higher urinary concentrations of arsenic
Although rice and rice products are typical first foods for infants, a new study found that infants who ate rice and rice products had higher urinary arsenic concentrations than those who did not consume any type of rice, according to an article published online by JAMA Pediatrics. (2016-04-25)

Overuse of antibiotics brings risks for bees -- and for us
Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have found that honeybees treated with a common antibiotic were half as likely to survive the week after treatment compared with a group of untreated bees, a finding that may have health implications for bees and people alike. (2017-03-14)

Damage encourages maple species to become female, Rutgers study finds
Jennifer Blake-Mahmud reports that striped maples not only change their sex periodically, but that they can wait until the last minute - three weeks before flowering - to do it. The switch appears to be triggered by physical damage, which can prompt a branch to flower female if it's cut off a male tree. (2018-02-22)

Pregnant moms and their offspring should limit added sugars in their diets to protect childhood cognition
A new study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine has determined that poorer childhood cognition occurred, particularly in memory and learning, when pregnant women or their offspring consumed greater quantities of sugar. Substituting diet soda for sugar-sweetened versions during pregnancy also appeared to have negative effects. However, children's fruit consumption had beneficial effects and was associated with higher cognitive scores. (2018-04-19)

'True polar wander' may have caused ice age
Earth's latest ice age may have been caused by changes deep inside the planet. Based on evidence from the Pacific Ocean, including the position of the Hawaiian Islands. (2018-11-19)

Opioid use prevalent among electronic dance music partygoers
One in 10 electronic dance music (EDM) party attendees have misused opioids in the past year, exceeding the national average, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing. (2018-03-29)

Now entering 'the valley of death'
Amid Trump comments and stock dive, let WUSTL expert in drug research and development Michael Kinch walk you through pharma 'Valley of Death.' (2017-01-12)

U-M researchers testing ways to make aspen-dominated forests resilient to climate change
In an aspen-dominated hardwood forest at the northern tip of the state's Lower Peninsula, University of Michigan scientists are testing ways to make the region's forests more resilient to climate change. (2019-06-17)

Sugars in infant formulas pose risk to babies with inherited metabolic disorder
Babies with inherited intolerance of fructose face a risk of acute liver failure if they are fed certain widely available formulas containing fructose, pediatricians and geneticists are warning. Baby formula manufacturers should remove fructose or sucrose, or explicitly label their products to allow parents to avoid those sweeteners if necessary, the doctors say. (2018-05-17)

A correlation between obesity and income has only developed in the past 30 years
It is well known that poorer Americans are more likely to be obese or suffer from diabetes; there is a strong negative correlation between household income and both obesity and diabetes. This negative correlation, however, has only developed in the past 30 years, according to researchers in Tennessee and London. Since 1990, the rise of obesity and diabetes was fastest among the poorest US regions, says Alexander Bentley of the University of Tennessee. (2018-12-11)

Lazy snakes! Pythons can be couch potatoes, too
A team of California researchers have studied factors associated with pythons digestion, assimilation and execretion of certain foods. Study shows that their energy stores are based more on what they eat than how much they eat. (2002-08-26)

How rare sugars might help control blood glucose
In an era when the label 'natural' hits a sweet spot with consumers, some uncommon sugars emerging on the market could live up to the connotation. Preliminary animal studies have suggested that allulose and other low-calorie, natural rare sugars could help regulate glucose levels. Now, researchers are investigating how they might exert such effects. They report their findings in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (2017-03-08)

Poison-ivy an unlikely hero in warding off exotic invaders?
The invasive Japanese knotweed causes much more severe damage to floodplain forests along the Susquehanna River, Pennsylvania, USA, than previously thought, report Bucknell University biology professor Chris Martine and his two student co-authors. Furthermore, in their paper in the open access Biodiversity Data Journal, the researchers point to a key role for the often-maligned poison-ivy as a native species that can not only compete with knotweed but also help sustain the growth of new trees. (2017-11-13)

UNH researchers find northern forests have lost crucial cold, snowy conditions
Winter conditions are changing more rapidly than any other season and researchers at the University of New Hampshire have found clear signs of a decline in frost days, snow covered days and other indicators of winter that could have lasting impacts on ecosystems, water supplies, the economy, tourism and human health. (2019-10-03)

Metastatic cancer gorges on fructose in the liver
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have demonstrated that metastatic cancer cells can reprogram their metabolism to thrive in new organs. Cells originating from colorectal cancer change their dietary habits to capitalize on the high levels of fructose often found in the liver. The finding offers both general and specific insights into new ways of fighting metastatic cancer. (2018-04-26)

Sugar in western diets increases risk for breast cancer tumors and metastasis
The high amounts of dietary sugar in the typical western diet may increase the risk of breast cancer and metastasis to the lungs, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (2016-01-01)

Michigan's sugar maples will struggle in a warmer, drier future despite help from nitrogen pollution
Though Michigan's sugar maples benefit from the growth-promoting effects of nitrogen compounds in the environment, those gains will not fully offset the added stresses of growing under a drier climate in the future, according to a new University of Michigan-led study. (2018-01-17)

St. Michael's Hospital study examines the relationship between sugars and heart health
There's an assumption that sugars are all bad, but a study led by researchers at St. Michael's Hospital suggests that the impact of sugars on heart health depends on the dose and type of sugar consumed. Led by Dr. John Sievenpiper, the team conducted a review of previous studies investigating the association between reported intakes of sugars and heart disease. The team found that that sugars behave differently depending on the type, dose and food. (2019-12-05)

High-fructose corn syrup boosts intestinal tumor growth in mice
Consuming a daily modest amount of high-fructose corn syrup -- the equivalent of people drinking about 12 ounces of a sugar-sweetened beverage daily -- accelerates the growth of intestinal tumors in mouse models of the disease, independently of obesity. (2019-03-21)

Discovery: A new form of light
Scientists have discovered a new method to create fluorescent light that may have promising applications from LEDs to medical imaging. (2016-10-05)

Agricultural fungicide attracts honey bees, study finds
When given the choice, honey bee foragers prefer to collect sugar syrup laced with the fungicide chlorothalonil over sugar syrup alone, researchers report in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-01-08)

Native trees, shrubs provide more food for birds
Plant native trees and shrubs in your yard, and you can really help songbirds. In a study of the Carolina chickadee in the metropolitan DC area, researchers from the University of Delaware and the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center found that native trees and shrubs support much more 'bird food' -- caterpillars -- than non-natives do. (2017-10-30)

Bubble volcano: Shaking, popping by earthquakes may cause eruptions
A new study on the connection between earthquakes and volcanoes took its inspiration from old engineering basics. Future applications of these results may enable better predictions of the likelihood of a volcanic eruption for communities affected by an earthquake. (2016-05-16)

Carbohydrates shape the profile of gut metabolites in piglet model of NEC
Study shows an association between the type of carbohydrates in formula; the products of metabolism or metabolites; and the risk of NEC in a preterm piglet model of the human condition. (2018-06-26)

Hard cider, with a shot of sugar
Autumn is the season for falling leaves, pumpkin-spice-flavored everything and apple cider. Yet new research indicates that, in addition to alcohol, some hard ciders may contain a hefty dose of added sugar, which may not be disclosed on the label. The researchers report their results in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. (2018-10-31)

Snowpack declines may stunt tree growth and forests' ability to store carbon emissions
Researchers conducting a 5-year-long study examining snow cover in a northern hardwood forest region found that projected changes in climate could lead to a 95 percent reduction of deep-insulating snowpack in forest areas across the northeastern United States by the end of the 21st century. The loss of snowpack would likely result in a steep reduction of forests' ability to store climate-changing carbon dioxide and filter pollutants from the air and water. (2018-12-01)

Landscape genetics branches out to help conserve riverside forests
A team of scientists lead by Dr Ikuyo Saeki of the University of Tsukuba, Japan, examined gene flow in the endangered maple, Acer miyabei, using landscape genetics, a powerful and increasingly popular tool in conservation projects. It involves the integration of population genetics and landscape ecology, in order to examine how recent landscape changes, for example, habitat fragmentation, have affected the genetic diversity of species. (2018-02-27)

Isoglucose and sucrose
Isoglucose, also known as high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS), is used in the food industry as a substance to sweeten processed foods such as soft drinks, creams, cakes, confectionery, yogurts etc. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) has been asked by various parties whether these sweeteners, which contain a high proportion of the free monosaccharide (simple sugar) fructose, pose a particular risk to health as compared to other sweeteners such as sucrose (household sugar, beet sugar, cane sugar). (2018-07-05)

The sugar wars: Rhetoric or reason?
Over the past 50 years researchers, clinicians, professional organizations, and health charities have waged war on sugar, calling for dietary recommendations to be changed and for a sugar tax on soft drinks and sweet treats in an effort to reduce obesity and cardiovascular diseases. (2018-08-27)

Climate change study finds that maple syrup season may come earlier
Once winter nights dip below freezing and the days warm up above freezing sap begins to flow in sugar maples marking the start of the syrup season. With climate change, daily temperatures are on the rise, which affects sap flow and sugar content. By 2100, the maple syrup season in eastern North America may be one month earlier than it was during 1950 and 2017, according to a study published in Forest Ecology and Management (2019-09-20)

Stabilizing dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane improves muscle function
In a head-to-head trial between the conventional glucocorticoid, prednisolone, and a modified glucocorticoid, vamorolone, in experimental models of LGMD2B, vamorolone improved dysferlin-deficient muscle cell membrane stability and repair. This correlated with increased muscle strength and decreased muscle degeneration, according to a Children's-led study published online Aug. 27, 2018, in Molecular Therapy. (2018-08-27)

New yeast model of metabolic disorders may lead to life-saving therapies
A new Tel Aviv University study suggests that the role of yeast, the world's most basic eukaryotic unicellular organism, may pave the way for the development of novel, more effective therapies for congenital diseases. (2019-01-16)

Page 1 of 11 | 430 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.