Popular Marathon Runners News and Current Events

Popular Marathon Runners News and Current Events, Marathon Runners News Articles.
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Study uncovers key to preventing back pain in runners
Low back pain is a common complaint among both elite and recreational runners, but the true cause of it remains a mystery. So researchers at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center used motion capture technology to observe how a runner's muscles work while they're in motion. (2018-01-03)

Fun run
Attention runners: The next time you go out for a jog, you might want to strap a light resistance band between your feet. This rather quirky but oddly effective hack, according to UC Santa Barbara mechanical engineer Elliot Hawkes, could make you a more efficient runner by approximately 6.4%. (2019-10-08)

Spying on topology
Topological insulators are quantum materials, which, due to their exotic electronic structure, on surfaces and edges conduct electric current like metal, while acting as an insulator in bulk. Scientists from the Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy (MBI) have demonstrated for the first time how to tell apart topological materials from their regular -- trivial -- counterparts within a millionth of a billionth of a second by probing it with ultra-fast laser light. (2019-10-02)

One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles
The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have more closely investigated this factor, from the group of myokines, and demonstrated that it is produced by the muscle and acts on both muscles and synapses. The results published in PNAS also provide new insights into age-related muscle atrophy. (2019-07-25)

Ditch plan to disregard all athletic world records before 2005, urge experts
The proposal by the European Athletics Council to disregard all athletic world records set before 2005 should be abandoned, insist experts in an editorial published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2017-12-07)

Talking to doctors about your bucket list could help advance care planning
For physicians, asking patients about their bucket lists, or whether they have one, can encourage discussion about making their medical care fit their life plans, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-02-08)

Physical activity can lead to difference in diet preferences between males, females
Recent studies have shown that approximately 90 percent of adult Americans fail to reach the US Department of Health guidelines for physical activity, which could be contributing to surging obesity rates. Now, new research by a multidisciplinary team of University of Missouri researchers suggests that physical activity can change diet preferences in males, but not in females -- an area that researchers say has not been thoroughly studied. (2017-09-05)

New research on the muscles of elite athletes: When quality is better than quantity
A Danish-Swedish research team working on a project led by University of Southern Denmark has discovered that muscle endurance is not only determined by the number of mitochondria, but also their structure. (2016-11-02)

No guts no glory: Harvesting the microbiome of athletes
Scientists have tapped into the microbiome of elite runners and rowers, and have identified particular bacteria that may aid athletic performance. The goal is to develop probiotic supplements that may help athletes -- and even amateur fitness enthusiasts -- recover from a tough workout or more efficiently convert nutrients to energy. The researchers will present their work today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-20)

New Zealand penguins make mammoth migrations, traveling thousands of kilometers to feed
Fiordland penguins, Eudyptes pachyrhynchus, known as Tawaki, migrate up to 2,500 km from their breeding site, according to a study publishing Aug. 29 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Thomas Mattern of the University of Otago and colleagues. (2018-08-29)

How exercise could help fight drug addiction
The siren call of addictive drugs can be hard to resist, and returning to the environment where drugs were previously taken can make resistance that much harder. However, addicts who exercise appear to be less vulnerable to the impact of these environmental cues. Now, research with mice suggests that exercise might strengthen a drug user's resolve by altering the production of peptides in the brain, according to a study in the journal ACS Omega. (2018-11-14)

Bones show prehistoric women's intensive manual labor during advent of agriculture
Comparisons of bone strength between prehistoric women and living female athletes demonstrate that prehistoric women performed rigorous manual labor for thousands of years in central Europe at levels exceeding those of modern women. (2017-11-29)

New heart attack test better informs of underlying condition
A new blood test developed by a University of Alberta physician promises to eliminate the guesswork clinicians face with an apparent heart attack. (2018-03-15)

NTU scientists create customizable, fabric-like power source for wearable electronics
Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have created a customizable, fabric-like power source that can be cut, folded or stretched without losing its function. Being highly stretchable, these flexible power sources are promising next-generation 'fabric' energy storage devices that could be integrated into wearable electronics. The team's findings have been published in the journal Advanced Materials. (2018-01-30)

Research debunks 'myth' that strenuous exercise suppresses the immune system
New research suggests that rather than dampen immunity, endurance sports, like this weekend's London Marathon, can actually boost the body's ability to fight off illness. (2018-04-20)

Tiny fossil horses put their back into it
A new study reveals that tiny fossil ancestors of modern horses may have moved quite differently to their living counterparts. (2016-04-27)

A model for describing the hydrodynamics of crowds
By studying the movement of runners at the start of marathons, researchers from a laboratory* affiliated with the CNRS, l'ENS de Lyon, and l'Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 have just shown that the collective movements of these crowds can be described as liquid flows. The flows observed before a 2016 race in Chicago subsequently helped predict those of thousands of runners in the starting corral of the 2017 Paris marathon. (2019-01-03)

Bone marrow edema in lower spine is common in young athletes
New research indicates that young recreational and elite athletes commonly accumulate excess fluid in the bone marrow around the joint that connects the spine with the pelvis. (2018-03-13)

How is big data impacting sports analytics?
Sports in all its forms, from Major League Baseball to Fantasy Football is driven by and produces huge amounts of data, and advanced data mining and machine learning techniques are now having a major impact on sports data analytics. (2018-12-20)

Do large human crowds exhibit a collective behavior?
By observing the collective movement of thousands of Chicago Marathon runners queueing up to the starting line, researchers find that the motion of large crowds is fluid-like and mathematically predictable. (2019-01-03)

Is coronary artery calcification in highly active people like marathon runners associated with increased risk of death?
Some studies have suggested that people with high levels of physical activity way beyond current physical activity guidelines, such as marathon runners, can have significant build-up of calcium in the arteries of their heart called coronary artery calcification (CAC). But data are limited about the risk of death in these highly active people with CAC. This study included nearly 22,000 men (average age almost 52) with varying levels of self-reported physical activity and who underwent CAC scanning. (2019-01-30)

Four skills key in establishing nurse-led cross-sector collaborations
About 70 percent of all variations in health care outcomes are explained by individuals' social conditions including housing, neighborhood conditions, and income, data show. In order to establish community cultures of health where people are empowered to live healthier lives, health care providers and community sector leaders in transportation, government, schools, and businesses must collaborate to address the social conditions that affect population health. (2018-05-29)

Using drones to simplify film animation
Producing realistic animated film figures is a highly complex technical endeavour. ETH researchers have now shown how drones can be used to greatly reduce the effort required in the process. (2018-12-05)

New review shows plant-based diets benefit athletes' heart health, endurance, recovery
A new scientific review published in the journal Nutrients provides evidence that plant-based athletes benefit from improvements in heart health, performance, and recovery. (2019-01-10)

Trauma research funding needed now more than ever, say experts
Funding for trauma research is needed now more than ever, and should become a priority in the wake of so many lives lost at mass casualty events -- including most recently at the Pulse nightclub in Orlando, Florida, say experts in an opinion piece published in the online journal Trauma Surgery & Acute Care Open. (2016-07-06)

Sudden cardiac arrest in athletes: Prevention and management
It's marathon season, and every so often a news report will focus on an athlete who has collapsed from sudden cardiac arrest. Although uncommon, these events get attention. A new review in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) looks at recent evidence to help physicians prevent and manage the risk of sudden cardiac arrest in competitive athletes. (2019-07-15)

When it comes to fuel efficiency, size matters for hummingbirds
New research finds that larger hummingbirds show better mechanochemical efficiency -- the first time this has been observed in birds (2018-03-07)

When it rains, snake bites soar
Rattlesnakes and other venomous reptiles may bite more people during rainy years than in seasons wracked by drought, a new study shows. (2018-09-05)

GVSU researcher compares running economy in Nike shoe, track spikes
Kyle Barnes, assistant professor of movement science at Grand Valley State University, has researched strategies to improve running economy and performance for years. He incorporated the Nike Vaporfly 4 percent shoes in his studies and in October published results in the journal Sports Medicine that validated Nike's original study results giving the shoe the 4 percent name, while at the same time, comparing the NVF to traditional track spikes worn during track racing. It's the first study to compare NVF with a spike shoe. (2018-12-12)

Exercise makes the blood of obese people healthier
Exercise can reduce inflammation in obese people by changing the characteristics of their blood, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. (2018-06-19)

Diet could help runners beat stomach issues
Research indicates that cutting out specific foods can alleviate the gastrointestinal issues some people experience when they exercise, with over two-thirds of people involved in a new study reporting an improvement. (2019-02-14)

Running multiple marathons does not increase risk of atherosclerosis
Running multiple marathons does not increase the risk of atherosclerosis, according to research published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. (2017-06-07)

Planned movements and spontaneous reactions are processed differently in the brain
Scientists from the German Primate Center - Leibniz Institute for Primate Research (DPZ) have been able to show in their recently published study of two rhesus monkeys that planned and spontaneous gripping movements have the same brain activity during the movement but that the preceded brain activity differs. (2018-06-20)

Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons. (2019-07-12)

Women more affected than men by air pollution when running marathons
Findings come from a comprehensive study that evaluated marathon race results, weather data and air pollutant concentrations in seven marathons over a period of eight to 28 years. The top three male and female finishing times were compared with the course record and contrasted with air pollutant levels, taking high temperatures that were detrimental to performance into consideration. (2010-03-02)

During disasters, active Twitter users likely to spread falsehoods
During disasters, active Twitter users are likely to spread falsehoods. That's according to new research that examined false tweets from Hurricane Sandy and the Boston Marathon bombing. Researchers found that 86 to 91 percent of active Twitter users spread misinformation, and that nearly as many did nothing to correct it. (2018-05-11)

Young athletes commonly develop bone marrow edema in the joints of the lower spine
Young athletes commonly develop bone marrow edema in their sacroiliac joints, and this damage is most frequent in the posterior lower ilium according to new research findings presented this week at the 2017 ACR/ARHP Annual Meeting in San Diego. (2017-11-04)

Stress fracture? Your foot hitting pavement wasn't the main problem
A segment of the multibillion-dollar wearables industry aims to save potential victims from this fate, but a Vanderbilt University engineering professor found a major problem: the devices are measuring the wrong thing. (2019-01-17)

Running shoes may cause damage to knees, hips and ankles
Running, although it has proven cardiovascular and other health benefits, can increase stresses on the joints of the leg. In a study published in the December 2009 issue of PM&R: The Journal of Injury, Function and Rehabilitation, researchers compared the effects on knee, hip and ankle joint motions of running barefoot versus running in modern running shoes. They concluded that running shoes exerted more stress on these joints compared to running barefoot or walking in high-heeled shoes. (2010-01-04)

Maximal running shoes may increase injury risk to some runners
Lower leg pain and injuries have long been a problem for runners, but research at Oregon State University-Cascades has shown maximal running shoes may increase such risks for some runners. (2018-06-25)

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