Popular Mate News and Current Events

Popular Mate News and Current Events, Mate News Articles.
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Choosy amphipods
Amphipods of the species Gammarus roeselii guard their chosen mates, often carrying them with them for days and defending them against potential rivals. This behavior requires a lot of time and energy, so that the males make their choice with care. Scientists at Goethe University have now investigated under which circumstances males are prepared to revise their decision. (2019-02-07)

Female mammals follow their noses to the right mates
Historically, most examples of female mate choice and its evolutionary consequences are found in birds. But that doesn't mean mammals aren't just as choosy, researchers say. It just means that mammal mate preferences may be harder to spot. (2009-03-17)

A deep male voice helps women remember
Men take note: If you want women to remember, speak to them in a low pitch voice. Then, they may rate you as a potential mate. That's according to a new study by scientists from the University of Aberdeen, UK. Their work shows for the first time that a low masculine voice is important for both mate choice and the accuracy of women's memory. The research is published online in Springer's journal, Memory & Cognition. (2011-09-12)

New research suggests bird songs isolate species
Two birds that look the same, but have songs so different they can't recognize each other, should be considered distinct species, suggests new research. Among 72 related populations of Central and South American birds the researchers tested, they found evidence for 21 new species. (2017-09-13)

Color vision variation in guppies influences female mate preference
A variety of animals have male-specific ornament traits and these ornaments are favored by female choice. Which male traits are preferred by females often varies among females. Genetic mechanisms that create and maintain variations in female preference has been one of the central questions in evolutionary ecology. (2018-11-19)

Mate or hibernate? That's the question worm pheromones answer
Scientists from the University of Florida, Cornell University, the California Institute of Technology and the US Department of Agriculture have discovered the first mating pheromone in one of science's most well-studied research subjects, the tiny worm Caenorhabditis elegans. But perhaps even more interesting is what the newly discovered pheromone also directs worms to do -- hibernate. (2008-07-24)

Scientists map monogamy, jealousy in the monkey mind
A recent study at the California National Primate Research Center studied jealousy in pair-bonded titi monkeys. The study was part of a larger study examining the neurobiology of pair-bonded primate species. (2017-10-19)

Horrific mating strategy appears to benefit both male and female redback spiders
A mating strategy among redback spiders where males seek out immature females appears to benefit both sexes, a new U of T Scarborough study has found. (2017-12-14)

Can we imitate organisms' abilities to decode water patterns for new technologies?
The shape of water. Can it tell us about what drives romance? Among fish, it might. Eva Kanso, a professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering studies fluid flows and almost like a forensic expert, Kanso, along with her team, is studying how aquatic signals are transported through the water. (2018-04-05)

These ring-tailed lemurs raise a 'stink' when they flirt with potential mates
Stink-flirting among ring-tailed lemurs come at a cost, but may also influence females in choosing a mate. (2017-11-17)

New study suggests tens of thousands of black holes exist in Milky Way's center
A Columbia University-led team of astrophysicists has discovered a dozen black holes gathered around Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), the supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. The finding is the first to support a decades-old prediction, opening up myriad opportunities to better understand the universe. (2018-04-04)

Our memory shifts into high gear when we think about raising our children, new study shows
Human memory has evolved so people better recall events encountered while they are thinking about raising their offspring, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2017-12-15)

Pest resistance to biotech crops surging
Pest resistance to genetically engineered crops Bt crops is evolving faster now than before, UA researchers show in the most comprehensive study to date. But as expected from evolutionary theory, resistance can be delayed if farmers comply with recommendations to make use of abundant refuges. (2017-10-10)

'Bisexual' beetles are simply inept, new study finds
New research shows that same-sex mating among male insects is more likely to be due to incompetence rather than sexual preference. More than 100 species of insects engage in same-sex mating behavior, and in some species the same-sex mating is more common than heterosexual mating. The research team studied the red flour beetle to find out why. (2018-05-10)

Genetic opposites attract when chimpanzees choose a mate
Duke University researchers find that chimpanzees are more likely to reproduce with mates whose genetic makeup most differs from their own. Many animals avoid breeding with parents, siblings and other close relatives, researchers say. But chimps are unusual in that even among virtual strangers they can tell genetically similar mates from more distant ones. Chimps are able to distinguish degrees of genetic similarity among unfamiliar mates many steps removed from them in their family tree. (2017-01-11)

UC biologist looks at butterflies to help solve human infertility
UC biologist helps decode the structural complexities of male butterfly ejaculate and co-evolving female reproductive tract. Findings from these biochemical relationships may help unlock certain mysteries of human infertility. (2017-06-27)

Galapagos study finds that new species can develop in as little as 2 generations
A study of Darwin's finches, which live on the Galapagos Islands in the Pacific Ocean, has revealed direct genetic evidence that new species can arise in just two generations. (2017-11-23)

Gene associated with pair-bonding in animals has similar effects in human males
Variation in the gene for one of the receptors for the hormone vasopressin appears to be associated with how human males bond with their partners, according to an international team of researchers. (2008-09-03)

Humans are creating quite a racket, even in the wilderness
Human-related noise is doubling background sound levels in 63 percent of US protected areas, where manmade disturbances are supposed to be reduced, a new study reveals. (2017-05-04)

From plant odorant detection to sex pheromone communication
Biologists at Lund University in Sweden are now able to show that the receptors enabling the primitive moth species, Eriocrania semipurpurella, find an individual of the opposite sex, probably evolved from receptors which help the moth perceive the fragrances of plants. (2017-08-25)

Money really does matter in relationships
Our romantic choices are not just based on feelings and emotions, but how rich we feel compared to others, a new study published in Frontiers in Psychology has found. (2016-05-24)

Quick quick slow is no-go in crab courtship dance
Female fiddler crabs are sensitive to changes in the speed of a male's courtship display, significantly preferring displays that accelerate to those that are performed at a constant speed or slow down. (2018-01-16)

Twisted sex allows mirror-image snails to mate face-to-face, research finds
A study led by the University of Nottingham has found that differently-coiled types of Japanese land snails should in fact be considered a single species, because -- against all odds - they are sometimes able to mate, a result which has implications for the classification of other snails. (2017-11-20)

Do male fish prefer them big and colourful?
Male black-finned goodeid or mexcalpique fish know what they want when they pick a female to mate with; they prefer them big-bellied and as orange as possible. Interestingly, females displaying these traits are the ones most able to produce more offspring that survive, two researchers from the National Autonomous University of Mexico have found. The study by Marcela Méndez-Janovitz and Constantino Macías Garcia is published in Springer's journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. (2017-10-10)

Moth females use scent proximity to attract mates
Female moths with an ineffective pheromone blend can use proximity to better-smelling females to attract mates. (2017-12-22)

White cheeks are more titillating
Male blue tits with white cheeks are healthier and more likely to mate with higher quality partners than their counterparts with duller cheek feathers. Having purer white cheeks also indicates that a blue tit was better able to overcome an infection with parasites during the previous year. This is according to Elisa Pérez Badás (Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Spain) who is lead author of a study published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature. (2018-02-06)

Are looks more important than personality when choosing a man?
When mothers and daughters have to choose potential partners, they do not look much further than skin deep. Mothers will choose a man who is only reasonably attractive for their daughters. Daughters on the other hand prefer an attractive man, no matter how respectful, friendly, or intelligent he may be. This is according to a study in Springer's journal Evolutionary Psychological Science, led by Madeleine Fugère of the Eastern Connecticut State University in the US. (2017-04-04)

Mayo Clinic discovers biological markers that could guide treatment for prostate cancer
Genetic alterations in low-risk prostate cancer diagnosed by needle biopsy can identify men that harbor higher-risk cancer in their prostate glands, Mayo Clinic has discovered. The research, which is published in the January edition of Mayo Clinic Proceedings, found for the first time that genetic alterations associated with intermediate- and high-risk prostate cancer also may be present in some cases of low-risk prostate cancers. (2019-01-03)

Nuptial gifts beat pheromones
Unlike many other species, male hunting spiders do not use chemical signals such as sex pheromones to attract a mate. Instead, they make their mark by uniquely exploiting a female hunting spider's interest in food. Research led by Cristina Tuni of the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich in Germany now shows that male hunting spiders wrap morsels of food in their silk and offer these as gifts to prospective mates. The study is published in Springer's journal Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology. (2018-03-01)

Why some mites are mightier than others: The evolution of lethal fighting in a spider mite
Unlike most male animals, some males of the social spider mite engage in deadly fights with rival males. Their level of aggression (low, mild or high) is related to the geographical location, and the resulting climate, of the colony in which the mites live. It appears that as the temperature rises, so do the tempers of the male spider mites. (2019-01-25)

It takes 2 to tango: Beetles are equal partners in mating behavior
Beetles that copulate with the same mate as opposed to different partners will repeat the same behavior, debunking previous suggestions that one sex exerts control over the other in copulation, new research has found. (2017-02-21)

What makes two species different?
For most of the 20th century, scientists believed that the reproductive incompatibility between species evolved gradually as a by-product of adapting to different environments. New Rochester research has shown there are more factors at play -- specifically the presence of 'selfish genes,' whose flow among species may dictate whether two species converge or diverge. (2019-01-03)

Fruit fly promiscuity alters the evolutionary forces on males
Researchers in the Department of Zoology at Oxford University have demonstrated for the first time what effect female fruit flies having multiple partners has on sexual selection -- before and after mating. Sexual selection is the branch of natural selection concerned with obtaining mates and fertility, rather than survival. (2019-01-17)

Deep in the fly brain, a clue to how evolution changes minds
A new study sheds light on the mystery of how evolution tweaks the brain to shape behavior. It started with a close look at two Drosophila species and their mating maneuvers. (2018-07-11)

Research shows that parental care is associated with mate value in adult offspring
Adults, who report having received higher levels of parental care in childhood, perceive themselves as more attractive mates. In particular, maternal care is associated with experienced mate value in adulthood. (2018-02-20)

Bacterial protein acts as aphrodisiac for choanoflagellates
United States researchers investigating how single-celled organisms evolved to become multicellular stumbled across a strange phenomenon during their experiments: Single-celled eukaryotes called choanoflagellates, which are the closest living relatives to animals, begin to sexually reproduce in response to a protein produced by bacteria. Why this happens in natural settings is still unclear, though they speculate that it could help the choanoflagellates easily mate with others from the same species. The finding is presented Aug. 31 in the journal Cell. (2017-08-31)

Illuminating the mysterious cultures of fruit flies
The lady fruit flies that inhabit your banana bowl may find green-colored mates with curly wings simply irresistible -- conforming to the 'local dating culture' of generations of female flies before them, a new study finds. (2018-11-29)

Calcium dynamics regulating the timing of decision-making in C. elegans
All animals make decisions according to information, but the detailed mechanism is not known. The researchers found that, a tiny worm chooses the direction in an odor space by mathematically integrating the information of odor concentration. Moreover, they also identified a gene responsible for the integration. Because integration of information has been known to be important for decision-making of more complex experimental animals such as monkeys, the gene for integration may also be important for decision-making even in humans. (2017-05-22)

Yerba mate's beneficial effects on cellular energy and lipid metabolism linked to weight
Researchers have shown that use of the dietary supplement yerba mate over an extended period had significant effects on body weight and weight gain and was associated with lower levels of blood lipids and insulin in obese mice fed a high-fat diet. (2017-11-14)

Why the 'perfect' body isn't always perfect
The hormones that make women physically stronger, more competitive and better able to deal with stress also tend to redistribute fat from the hips to the waist, according to Elizabeth Cashdan, an anthropologist at the University of Utah. So in societies and situations where women are under pressure to procure resources, they may be less likely to have the classic hourglass figure. (2008-12-02)

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