Popular Maternal Mortality News and Current Events

Popular Maternal Mortality News and Current Events, Maternal Mortality News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan. (2018-07-10)

Are vitamin supplements used before or during pregnancy associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder?
The use of folic acid and multivitamin supplements by women before and during pregnancy was associated with a lower likelihood of autism spectrum disorder in children but this finding  needs to be interpreted with caution because other factors could explain it. (2018-01-03)

Nutritional supplements and diets not always protective, WVU research suggests
Do the nutritional supplements people take or the diets they adhere to actually protect them against cardiovascular problems and death? Maybe not, suggests a new umbrella review of meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials by Safi Khan, an assistant professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine. (2019-07-08)

Cancer mortality continues steady decline, driven by progress against lung cancer
The cancer death rate declined by 29% from 1991 to 2017, including a 2.2% drop from 2016 to 2017, the largest single-year drop in cancer mortality ever reported. The news comes from Cancer Statistics, 2020, the latest edition of the American Cancer Society's annual report on cancer rates and trends. (2020-01-08)

Study clusters health behavior groups to broaden public health interventions
A new study led by a University of Kansas researcher has used national health statistics and identified how to cluster seven health behavior groups based on smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, physician visits and flu vaccination are associated with mortality. (2017-03-15)

Cancer expert says public health and prevention measures are key to defeating cancer
Is investment in research to develop new treatments the best approach to controlling cancer? Many people believe that the time is right for another big push to defeat cancer, including President Obama, who called for a major cancer-fighting campaign in his final State of the Union address. But in the latest paper, 'Targeting the Cancer Moonshot' in JAMA Oncology, this kind of effort will never cure cancer without public health and prevention. (2016-03-03)

Association between weight before pregnancy, weight gain during pregnancy and adverse outcomes for mother, infant
An analysis that combined the results of 25 studies including nearly 197,000 women suggests prepregnancy body mass index (BMI) of the mother was more strongly associated with risk of adverse maternal and infant outcomes than the amount of gestational weight gain. (2019-05-07)

Breast cancer statistics, 2017
Breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 breast cancer deaths during those 26 years. Death rates in several states are now statistically equivalent, perhaps reflecting an elimination of disparities in those states. (2017-10-03)

Simple breathing training with a physiotherapist before surgery prevents postoperative pneumonia
Pneumonia, and other serious lung complications, after major abdominal surgery were halved when patients were seen by a physiotherapist before surgery and taught breathing exercises that the patient needed to start performing immediately on waking from the operation, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-24)

Dietary factors associated with substantial proportion of deaths from heart disease, stroke, and disease
Nearly half of all deaths due to heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in the US in 2012 were associated with suboptimal consumption of certain dietary factors, according to a study appearing in the March 7 issue of JAMA. (2017-03-07)

Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease
Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. (2017-11-14)

Food policies could lower US cardiovascular disease rates
New research conducted by the University of Liverpool and partners shows that food policies, such as fruit and vegetable subsidies, taxes on sugar sweetened drinks, and mass media campaigns to change dietary habits, could avert hundreds of thousands of deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States. (2017-06-06)

In the January Health Affairs: Brazil's primary health care expansion
The January issue of Health Affairs includes a study that explores a much-discussed issue in global health: the role of governance in improving health, which is widely recognized as necessary but is difficult to tie to actual outcomes. (2017-01-09)

How bees live with bacteria
More than 90 percent of all bee species are not organized in colonies, but fight their way through life alone. They are also threatened. Scientists from Würzburg demand more research on the ecology of these insects. (2019-08-27)

Maternal inflammation boosts serotonin and impairs fetal brain development in mice
Fighting the flu during pregnancy sickens a pregnant woman, but it may also put the fetus at a slightly increased risk for neurodevelopmental disorders like autism later in life. A new study in pregnant mice, published June 1 in The Journal of Neuroscience, offers a potential mechanism explaining why: Inflammation alters neurotransmitters and impairs growth of nerve cells in the developing fetal brain. (2016-05-31)

Wide variation in rate of death between VA hospitals for patients with heart disease, heart failure
Death rates for veterans with ischemic heart disease and chronic heart failure varied widely across the Veterans Affairs (VA) health care system from 2010 to 2014, which could suggest differences in the quality of cardiovascular health care provided by VA medical centers. (2018-05-16)

Lung cancer mortality rates among women projected to increase by over 40 percent by 2030
The global age-standardized lung cancer mortality rate among women is projected to increase by 43 percent from 2015 to 2030, according to an analysis of data from 52 countries. The global age-standardized breast cancer mortality rate is projected to decrease by 9 percent in the same time frame. (2018-08-01)

Breastfeeding reduces hypertension risk
A study published in the American Journal of Hypertension indicates that women who breastfeed more children, and for longer periods of time, are less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause. This is less true of obese women, however. (2018-01-30)

Pericardial window operation less efficient in cases of lung cancer than any other cancer
Pericardial window operation, a procedure, where abnormal quantity of malignant fluid, surrounding the heart, is drained into the neighbouring chest cavity, is commonly applied to patients diagnosed with cancer. Taiwanese specialists have now looked into the electronic medical records from a hospital and concluded that the treatment is not as effective in lung cancer cases when compared to any other cancer patients. Their research is published in the open access journal Research Ideas and Outcomes. (2016-04-11)

Babies' babbling betters brains, language
Babies are adept at getting what they need -- including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key. (2018-01-18)

Discovering the early age immune response in foals
Researchers at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine have discovered a new method to measure tiny amounts of antibodies in foals, a finding described in the May 16 issue of PLOS ONE. The methodology will help understand how fast a foal starts producing its own antibodies, which in turn will help optimize recommendations for young horse vaccination schedules, said Dr. Julia Felippe, associate professor of large animal medicine, and research associate Rebecca Tallmadge. (2017-06-29)

Maternal vaccination again influenza associated with protection for infants
How long does the protection from a mother's immunization against influenza during pregnancy last for infants after they are born? (2016-07-05)

Risk of autism increased in children of mothers with diabetes
The risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was increased in children of mothers with the three main types of diabetes that complicate pregnancy, findings that add new information on type 1 diabetes and extend what is already known about type 2 and gestational diabetes. (2018-06-23)

Women with obesity prior to conception are more likely to have children with obesity
A systematic review and meta-analysis identified significantly increased odds of child obesity when mothers have obesity before conception, according to a study published June 11, 2019 in the open-access journal PLOS Medicine by Nicola Heslehurst of Newcastle University in the UK, and colleagues. (2019-06-11)

Children with social anxiety, maternal history of depression more likely to develop depression
Although researchers have known for decades that depression runs in families, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, suggests that children suffering from social anxiety may be at particular risk for depression in the future. (2020-09-03)

Healthcare spending in late life is not wasteful, predictive model shows
End-of-life health care spending in the United States is not wasteful, a new study says; many recipients of such expenditures aren't, in fact, certain to die, as the thinking goes. (2018-06-28)

A mother's attention affects the genetic code of her young
In mice, a new study reveals that pups that receive less maternal care have more repeated genetic sequences, called transposons, in neurons that reside in their hippocampus. (2018-03-22)

Alignment of mother and offspring body clock could prevent diseases such as heart disease and obesity
The care provided by a mother can impact the body clock and health of offspring after birth, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology. By reducing abnormalities in the body clock of offspring, it may be possible to develop therapies for serious lifestyle-related diseases, such as heart disease and obesity. (2018-05-11)

Factors affecting the success of grizzly bear translocations
The number of grizzly bear translocations has increased in recent years to protect the bears and reduce conflicts with humans. In a recent Journal of Wildlife Management analysis of translocations in Alberta, Canada, researchers found that the most important factors for translocation success were the level of human-caused mortality risk at the release site and the time of year when the translocation occurred. (2018-01-10)

'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring moms
The female Southern African python is the first ever egg-laying snake species shown to care for their babies. This comes at great cost to themselves, as they never eat during the breeding period -- with many snakes starving -- and turn their color to black in order to attract more sun while basking to raise their body temperature. (2018-03-14)

Maternal love: How a mother's brain responds to her infant
The distinctive ability of mothers to identify the cries of their offspring is widely evident in nature, where it is critical to the survival of these offspring. (2008-02-28)

Stress during pregnancy
The environment the unborn child is exposed to inside the womb can have a major effect on her or his development and future health. Maternal stress during pregnancy can be transmitted biologically to the unborn child. A team of researchers, led by Prof. Dr. Sonja Entringer from the Institute of Medical Psychology at Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, is starting a new study about the potential effects of stress during pregnancy on newborn cell biology. (2016-06-07)

Air pollution is associated with cancer mortality beyond lung cancer
A large scale epidemiological study associates some air pollutants with kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer death. (2017-10-31)

Patients with atrial fibrillation at greater risk of death in rural hospitals than urban hospitals
Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) admitted to rural hospitals in the United States have a greater chance of dying during their hospital stay than patients admitted to urban hospitals for the same condition, according to a new report in HeartRhythm. (2017-12-11)

Moffitt Cancer Center awarded $3.2 million grant to study bone metastasis in prostate cancer
Moffitt researchers David Basanta, Ph.D., and Conor Lynch, Ph.D., have been awarded a U01 grant to investigate prostate cancer metastasis. Prostate cancer frequently spreads to the bone, and can cause painful bony lesion and increased mortality for patients. Their study will integrate molecular, cellular and clinical information into mathematical models to better understand key factors driving the disease to help target when metastasis may occur and identify new therapeutic targets for its prevention. (2016-07-13)

Common pesticides kill amphibian parasites, study finds
A recent study by Jessica Hua, assistant professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, and colleagues, explored the effects of six commonly used pesticides on two different populations of a widespread parasite of amphibians. They found that a broad range of insecticides commonly used in the US kill amphibian parasites, which could potentially decrease the number of parasites that amphibians must defend against. For the pyrethroid and neonicotinoid pesticides tested in this study, this pattern has not been documented before. (2016-04-04)

Rate of decline of cardiovascular deaths slows in US
In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Stephen Sidney, M.D., M.P.H., of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, and colleagues examined recent national trends in death rates due to all cardiovascular disease (CVD), heart disease (HD), stroke, and cancer, and also evaluated the gap between mortality rates from HD and cancer. (2016-06-29)

How to attack Africa's neonatal mortality problem
Giving birth at home is the most significant risk factor for neonatal deaths in major sections of Africa -- a continent that continues to be plagued by the highest neonatal mortality rates in the world, indicates a new study by Michigan State University scholars. (2017-06-01)

Cigarette price differences and infant mortality in the European Union
Higher cigarette prices were associated with reduced infant mortality in the European Union, while increased price differences between premium and budget cigarettes were associated with higher infant mortality, according to a new article published by JAMA Pediatrics. (2017-09-18)

Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically from one zip code to the next
Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically even across neighboring zip codes, according to a new analysis and mapping tool from researchers at The University of Texas System and UT Health Northeast. The analysis and searchable map, which are the first of their kind in Texas, use data from Texas Vital Statistics Linked Birth and Death Records from 2011-2014. (2018-01-19)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.