Popular Maternity Care News and Current Events

Popular Maternity Care News and Current Events, Maternity Care News Articles.
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The Lancet: Health progress threatened by neglect of gender
Today, The Lancet published a new Series on 'Gender Equality, Norms and Health', which finds that governments and health institutions have persistently failed to make progress towards gender equality, despite the impact of gender -- and the spoken and unspoken rules of societies about acceptable gender behaviors -- on health throughout life. Set to be launched at the annual 'Women Deliver 2019' [1] conference, this Lancet Series is the result of a four-year project developed by over 100 contributors from five continents. (2019-05-30)

Breastfed babies are less likely to have eczema as teenagers, study shows
Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54 percent lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study led by researchers from King's College London, Harvard University, University of Bristol and McGill University shows. (2017-11-13)

Did prolonged breastfeeding reduce risk of asthma, atopic eczema in adolescents?
A breastfeeding program appeared to reduce the development of atopic eczema (an allergic skin response) but not asthma and lung function among children at age 16. (2017-11-13)

How to attack Africa's neonatal mortality problem
Giving birth at home is the most significant risk factor for neonatal deaths in major sections of Africa -- a continent that continues to be plagued by the highest neonatal mortality rates in the world, indicates a new study by Michigan State University scholars. (2017-06-01)

Improved maternity care practices decrease racial gaps in breastfeeding in the US South
A new paper published in Pediatrics links successful implementation of Baby-Friendly™ practices in the southern US with increases in breastfeeding rates and improved, evidence-based care. The changes were especially positive for African-American women. (2019-01-18)

Physician moms are often subject to workplace discrimination
Of the nearly 6,000 physician mothers in the survey, nearly 78 percent reported discrimination of any type. Forms of perceived discrimination ranged from disrespect and reduced pay to being overlooked for promotions or being held to higher performance standards. (2017-05-08)

Primary care clinicians' willingness to care for transgender patients
A new survey finds that most family medicine and general internal medicine clinicians are willing to provide routine care for transgender patients. (2018-11-12)

Victims of violence stop breastfeeding sooner
One in four women who have been victims of violence as adults are at risk of stopping breastfeeding before their baby is four months old. (2016-03-09)

New framework for multimorbidity care identifies changes and gaps
Researchers have developed a new framework for reporting and designing models of care for multimorbidity. (2017-11-20)

What makes a happy working mom?
A happy working mom feels competent in interacting with her child, experiences a sense of freedom and choice in her actions, while having a warm and affectionate relationship with her baby. She is also not too hard on herself about how she is faring as a mother. So says Katrijn Brenning of the University of Ghent in Belgium who led research that investigated what affects a working mother's sense of well-being. The study is published in Springer's Journal of Happiness Studies. (2017-12-06)

Align funding with innovations in health care to improve patient outcomes
To encourage innovation in health care, governments need to move away from current siloed funding to funding that encourages collaboration among providers in managing patients who need care in a variety of settings, argue the authors of an analysis in CMAJ. (2018-08-13)

Pregnancy and motherhood during surgical training: Results of a nationwide survey
Research reveals significant cultural challenges and infrastructure shortcomings that led respondents to seriously consider leaving residency and report they would advise against pursuing a career in surgery. (2018-03-21)

Patients in primary care networks had fewer visits to ED, shorter stays
Patients receiving care from physicians in primary care networks were less likely to visit emergency departments, according to a new study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-03-12)

Study reveals benefits of yoga for pregnant women
New research in pregnant women suggests that practicing yoga activates the parasympathetic nervous system (which is responsible for bodily functions when at rest) during the third trimester, improves sleep at night, and decreases α-amylase levels, indicating reduced stress. (2018-07-18)

Roles and functions of community health workers in primary care
Community health workers in primary care provide clinical services, community resource connections, and health education and coaching. As trained individuals with limited or no formal medical education, they are widely considered to have the potential to enhance primary care access and quality, but remain underutilized. (2018-05-14)

Research in AJN shows increase in private and public place infant abductions
The American Journal of Nursing announced today results from a study, based on 23 years of data collection, identifying new trends in nonfamily infant abductions. The report, conducted in partnership with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, showed that while the number of abductions in hospital settings dramatically declined, those from private homes and public places have increased in incidence. Among private home and public place abductions, there has also been an increase in violence and lower infant recovery rates. (2008-09-04)

Primary care practices use 4 complementary methods to identify high-risk patients
Risk stratified care management -- assigning a patient to a risk category on which care is based -- is increasingly viewed as a way to improve care and reduce costs. This research appears in the September/October 2017 Annals of Family Medicine. (2017-09-12)

Media Alert: The Lancet special issue on primary health care
'Primary health care is in crisis... Leadership after the Astana meeting is essential to rejuvenate and revitalise all aspects of primary health care.' -- The Lancet special issue on primary health care marks 40 years since landmark Alma-Ata Declaration. (2018-10-18)

Use of quality improvement strategies among US primary care practices
Small- to medium-sized practices with quality improvement systems (e.g., registries) are most likely to use quality improvement strategies. Practices with fewer major disruptions are more likely to use quality improvement strategies to improve cardiovascular preventive services. (2018-04-09)

Deaths during childbirth reduce by half
In their latest report a team of academics, clinicians and charity representatives, called MBRRACE-UK, has looked at the quality of care for stillbirths and neonatal deaths of babies born at term who were alive at the onset of labor, singletons (sole births) and who were not affected by a major congenital anomaly. This type of death occurred in 225 pregnancies in 2015 in the UK. It is important to study the deaths of these babies as any normally formed baby who is alive at the onset of labor at term would be expected to be alive and healthy at birth. (2017-11-27)

Study examines impact of extended maternity leave on breastfeeding in active duty mothers
This study evaluates the effects of prolongation of maternity leave duration on the initiation and duration of breastfeeding in active duty mothers at a single military treatment facility. Secondary outcomes assessed infant and maternal health outcomes, branch related impact and officer versus enlisted status. (2018-05-05)

Primary care physician involvement at end of life associated with less costly, less intensive care
A new study published in the January/February issue of Annals of Family Medicine finds that primary care physician involvement at the end of life is associated with less costly and less intensive end-of-life care. (2017-01-09)

Bats in attics might be necessary for conservation
Researchers investigate and describe the conservation importance of buildings relative to natural, alternative roosts for little brown bats in Yellowstone National Park. (2019-11-19)

New DNA antenatal screening for Down's syndrome shown to be a 'transformational advance'
Medical scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have demonstrated for the first time that it is possible to incorporate DNA analysis into antenatal screening for three serious chromosome disorders, including Down's syndrome, in a way that is far more accurate than existing methods, and safer and less stressful for mothers. (2017-11-08)

Having fully stocked cart to treat malignant hyperthermia during labor not cost-beneficial
Maintaining a stocked cart, with a full supply of the life-saving drug dantrolene, to treat malignant hyperthermia, a rare but potentially fatal adverse reaction to general anesthesia, may not be cost-beneficial in hospital maternity units where the incidence of the reaction is low, according to a new paper published in the Online First edition of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). (2018-04-18)

Quality, experience of outpatient care in US for adults with or without primary care
Adults who have primary care receive similar amounts of care as adults who don't, but they receive more high-value care, similar low-value care, and report better access and patient experiences. In this analysis, researchers used data from an annual nationally representative survey to compare 49,286 adults with primary care to 21,133 adults without primary care. Health care systems in many countries are organized around primary care, whereas health care in the US is organized around hospitals and specialty care. (2019-01-28)

Study shows link between breastfeeding and infant health is not straight-forward
Results from new study suggest that the benefits of breastfeeding reported in the vast majority of prior research could be influenced by the mother's characteristics, such as what they know about health and nutrition. The findings could help guide policy makers and health care professionals when it comes to providing critical information to expectant mothers about feeding their newborns. (2018-09-25)

Innovations in primary care: Behavioral approach to treating Opioid use disorder
Innovations in primary care: Behavioral approach to treating Opioid use disorder. (2018-01-09)

Prenatal testing of the fetal rhesus factor: Test is reliable, but benefit is unclear
The new noninvasive test, using a blood sample of the pregnant woman, is as reliable as the conventional test using a blood sample of the newborn. Studies on benefit and harm are still lacking. (2018-05-15)

Lower cost, higher quality primary care practices are distinguished by six attributes
Exploring attributes of high-value primary care. (2017-11-15)

Group B streptococcus test for pregnant women: advantage of universal screening unclear
Informative studies are still lacking for the comparison with the currently used risk-based strategy. (2019-02-05)

Maternal smoking during pregnancy increases risk of ADHD among offspring up to 3-fold
The higher the cotinine levels were in the mother's blood during pregnancy, the greater was the child's risk of developing attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) later in life, showed an epidemiological study conducted by the Research Centre for Child Psychiatry at the University of Turku, Finland. Globally, it is the first study in which the connection between fetal nicotine exposure and diagnosis of ADHD was shown by measuring cotinine levels from pregnant maternal serum specimens. (2019-02-26)

Expectant mother's elevated blood pressure raises child's risk of obesity
When expectant mothers have elevated blood pressure during pregnancy, it may raise their children's risk of developing childhood obesity, according to a study published in the Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. (2017-09-27)

TV's influence on pregnancy, childbirth more powerful than many women admit
UC sociology research may reveal a surprisingly stronger-than-expected influence from TV reality shows and other media on pregnant women's perception and management of their pregnancy and childbirth -- possibly impacting more highly educated consumers. (2018-02-13)

Study shows lower mortality from induction of labor at 41 weeks
Inducing labor after 41 instead of 42 full weeks' pregnancy appears to be safer in terms of perinatal survival, new Swedish research shows. The current study is expected to provide a key piece of evidence for upcoming decisions in maternity care. (2019-11-21)

Ensuring the survival of elephants in Laos: A matter of economics
Asian elephant populations in Laos, which are under a process of commodification, have dropped by half in the last 30 years. According to researchers from CNRS and Beauval Nature, the dynamics of elephant populations depend heavily on the socioeconomic practices of the country and elephant owners. The setting-up of a 'maternity leave' system to compensate owners for their losses of income during breeding period would contribute to the species' long-term survival. (2017-11-01)

Grizzly bears move into polar bear habitat in Manitoba, Canada
Grizzly bears are moving into an area along the Hudson Bay that is traditionally inhabited by polar bears, and the sightings of grizzly bears are increasing in frequency. (2010-02-23)

The coming crisis of long-term care
Care for the elderly--whose responsibility is it, and who pays for it--is the focus of this week's editorial. (2003-05-22)

Teen moms more likely to have premature babies
Pregnant women aged 14-17 years are at higher risk of preterm birth and of having a child with low birth weight, especially if they are having their second child. Researchers writing in the open-access journal BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth demonstrate this association and call for better health education and the promotion of contraception after a teenager has given birth for the first time. (2010-07-08)

A theoretical model to alleviate primary care strain
Co-management of patients by more than one primary care clinician is among new models of care designed to meet the demand for high quality patient care. A new co-management model lays the groundwork for potential care partnerships between nurse practitioners and physicians. It finds that effective nurse practitioner-physician co-management requires three core attributes: effective communication, mutual respect and trust, and a shared philosophy of care. (2018-05-14)

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