Popular Mayo Clinic News and Current Events

Popular Mayo Clinic News and Current Events, Mayo Clinic News Articles.
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Mayo discovery means individualized ovarian, brain cancer therapies
Mayo Clinic researchers have discovered that a molecular communication pathway -- thought to be defective in cancer -- is a key player in determining the effectiveness of measles virus oncolytic cancer treatment in ovarian and aggressive brain cancers. This discovery enabled researchers to develop an algorithm to predict treatment effectiveness in individual patients. The findings appear in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. (2018-05-16)

Consent forms design influences patient willingness to share personal health information
Patients are sometimes asked to share their personal health information for research purposes. Informed consent and trust are critical components in a patient's decision to participate in research. Researchers at the University of Florida conducted a three-arm randomized controlled trial to compare the effects on patient experiences of three electronic consent (e-consent) designs that asked them to share PHI for research purposes. (2021-01-12)

Predictors of successfully quitting smoking among smokers registered at the quit smoking clinic at a public hospital in northeastern Malaysia
In the current issue of Family Medicine and Community Health, Nur Izzati Mohammad et al. consider how cigarette smoking is one of the risk factors leading to noncommunicable diseases such as cardiovascular and respiratory system diseases and cancer. (2019-01-04)

Rheumatoid arthritis meets precision medicine
Scientists are bringing precision medicine to rheumatoid arthritis for the first time by using genetic profiling of joint tissue to see which drugs will work for which patients, reports a new multi-site study. In the near future, patients won't have to waste time and be disappointed with months of ineffective therapy, scientists said. Currently $2.5 billion a year is wasted on therapy that doesn't work. (2018-03-19)

Noninvasive stimulation device can help prevent migraine attacks
A migraine is much more than just a bad headache. Migraine symptoms, which can be debilitating for many people, are the sixth leading cause of disability, according to the World Health Organization. (2018-03-28)

Heart attack protocol can improve outcomes, reduce disparities between men and women
Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that implementing a four-step protocol for the most severe type of heart attack not only improved outcomes and reduced mortality in both men and women, but eliminated or reduced the gender disparities in care and outcomes typically seen in this type of event. (2018-03-10)

Computers equal radiologists in assessing breast density and associated breast cancer risk
Automated breast-density evaluation was just as accurate in predicting women's risk of breast cancer, found and not found by mammography, as subjective evaluation done by radiologists, in a study led by researchers at UC San Francisco and Mayo Clinic. (2018-04-30)

Receiving care in a multidisciplinary prostate cancer clinic increases discussion about treatment options and adherence to national guidelines
Newly diagnosed prostate cancer patients have multiple standard-of-care treatment options available, but many are not fully informed of their choices. A study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found men who seek treatment at a multidisciplinary (MultiD) prostate cancer clinic are more likely to be advised about treatment choices and to receive care that complies with evidence-based treatment guidelines. (2019-11-19)

Science and legal experts debate future uses and impact of human genome editing in Gender & the Genome
Precise, economical genome editing tools such as CRISPR have made it possible to make targeted changes in genes, which could be applied to human embryos to correct mutations, prevent disease, or alter traits. A panel of experts discusses the controversies related to the possibility of editing the human embryonic genome and creating man-made modifications that would be passed on to future generations, in a Roundtable Discussion published in Gender and the Genome. (2016-12-13)

Weight loss surgery linked to an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease
A new Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics analysis has found a link between the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a past history of weight loss surgery. (2018-03-07)

Improving mannequin design and training sessions could boost residents' success in clinic
As mannequins go, preemie Hal is on the top of his game. Because he's not real, that's where Hal and mannequins like him fall short, Children's National Health System researchers explained during the 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics national conference. (2017-09-15)

Kidney stones on the rise, Mayo Clinic study finds
Kidney stones are a painful health condition, often requiring multiple procedures at great discomfort to the patient. Growing evidence suggests that the incidence of kidney stones is increasing steadily, especially in women. Using data from the Rochester Epidemiology Project, Mayo Clinic researchers investigated the rise in stone formers to determine if this is a new trend, or simply an improvement in the way kidney stones are detected. Their findings appear in the March issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-02-13)

When neurons are out of shape, antidepressants may not work
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed medication for major depressive disorder (MDD), yet scientists still do not understand why the treatment does not work in nearly thirty percent of patients with MDD. Now, Salk Institute researchers have discovered differences in growth patterns of neurons of SSRI-resistant patients. The work has implications for depression as well as other psychiatric conditions such as bipolar disorder and schizophrenia that likely also involve abnormalities of the serotonin system in the brain. (2019-03-22)

Patients to skip the lab, get immediate results with new blood test technology
Engineers have developed a mobile version of the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA), proving a cheap and easy way to obtain bloodwork and urinalysis without visiting a laboratory. (2018-03-26)

Researchers find prostate cancer drug byproduct can fuel cancer cells
A genetic anomaly in certain men with prostate cancer may impact their response to common drugs used to treat the disease, according to new research at Cleveland Clinic. The findings may provide important information for identifying which patients potentially fare better when treated with an alternate therapy. In a newly published study, researchers found that abiraterone, a common prostate cancer drug, yields high-levels of a testosterone-like byproduct in men with advanced disease who have a specific genetic variant. (2018-06-25)

Bevacizumab dramatically improves severe hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) associated bleeding
Patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) with severe bleeding, who were treated with intravenous bevacizumab, reported a marked reduction in nose bleeds and gastrointestinal bleeding and were able to stop or considerably reduce blood transfusions, resulting in significantly improved quality of life. A new study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings provides good quality evidence for the excellent safety profile and efficacy of intravenous bevacizumab in the management of these patients. (2018-01-29)

Memory training for the immune system
The immune system will memorize the pathogen after an infection and can therefore react promptly after reinfection with the same pathogen. Now, scientists at the University of W├╝rzburg have deciphered new details of this process. (2020-09-28)

Research paves the way for treatment strategies of multidrug-resistant chronic infections
A new study published in Cell Press finds that antibiotic treatment of chronic infections can be optimized by targeting vulnerabilities of antibiotic-resistant pathogens paving the way for more effective treatment strategies. (2018-01-05)

Experts call for action to address physician burnout in nephrology
Kidney specialists face increasing work demands, high rates of burnout, and declining interest in nephrology as a career. A group of articles publishing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN) sheds light on how that these factors threaten to reduce job satisfaction and impair the delivery of high-quality care to patients with kidney diseases. (2018-01-11)

Cryoablation continues to show good results for kidney cancer patients
A review of 62 Mayo Clinic patients who underwent cryoablation to treat cancerous kidney tumors shows that the patients are cancer free for up to two and a half years after having had the procedure. (2007-11-25)

mHealth as effective as clinic-based intervention for people with serious mental illness
A mobile health (mHealth) intervention was found to be as effective as a clinic-based group intervention for people with serious mental illness in a new study published online today in Psychiatric Services. In a randomized controlled trial, researchers compared an mHealth approach (FOCUS), using mobile phones to deliver intervention, to a more traditional clinic-based group intervention, the Wellness Recovery Action Plan (WRAP). (2018-05-25)

Research finds hysterectomy alone associated with increased long-term health risks
Mayo Clinic researchers show that hysterectomy with ovarian conservation is associated with a significantly increased risk of several cardiovascular diseases and metabolic conditions. The findings are published in Menopause. (2018-01-03)

The dangers of hidden fat: Exercise is your best defense against deep abdominal fat
Researchers analyzed two types of interventions -- lifestyle modification (exercise) and pharmacological (medicine) -- to learn how best to defeat fat lying deep in the belly. (2019-02-01)

Final artificial pancreas clinical trials now open
Clinical trials are now enrolling to provide the final tests for a University of Virginia-developed artificial pancreas to automatically monitor and regulate blood-sugar levels in people with type 1 diabetes. (2017-02-07)

Cleveland Clinic researchers find link between bacterial imbalances and breast cancer
In a newly published study, Cleveland Clinic researchers have uncovered differences in the bacterial composition of breast tissue of healthy women vs. women with breast cancer. The research team has discovered for the first time that healthy breast tissue contains more of the bacterial species Methylobacterium, a finding which could offer a new perspective in the battle against breast cancer. (2017-10-06)

New tool to improve blood pressure measurement
Oxford University researchers have developed a prediction model that uses three separate blood pressure readings taken in a single consultation and basic patient characteristics to give an adjusted blood pressure reading that is significantly more accurate than existing models for identifying hypertension. (2016-03-21)

Patients who get opioids in the ER are less likely to use them long-term
Compared to other medical settings, emergency patients who are prescribed opioids for the first time in the emergency department are less likely to become long-term users and more likely to be prescribed these powerful painkillers in accordance with The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) guidelines. A paper analyzing 5.2 million prescriptions for opioids is being published online today in Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2017-09-26)

Obese mice lose anxiety when 'zombie cells' exit their brain
Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators have shown in mice that obesity increases the level of 'zombie' or senescent cells in the brain, and that those cells, in turn, are linked to anxiety. When senolytic drugs are used to clear those cells, the anxious behaviors in the mice dissipate. These findings appear in Cell Metabolism. (2019-01-03)

Research test identifies BRCA2 gene mutations that lead to breast, ovarian cancers
A new test developed by researchers at Mayo Clinic shows which mutations in the BRCA2 gene make women susceptible to developing breast or ovarian cancers. The research behind the test was published today in the American Journal of Human Genetics. (2018-01-25)

Cellular pathway of genetic heart disease similar to neurodegenerative disease
Research on a genetic heart disease has uncovered a new and unexpected mechanism for heart failure. This landmark discovery found a correlation between the clumping of RNA-binding proteins long linked to neurodegenerative disease and the aggregates of protein found in the heart tissue of patients with RBM20 dilated cardiomyopathy. (2020-11-18)

Exercise changes gut microbial composition independent of diet, team reports
Two studies -- one in mice and the other in human subjects -- offer the first definitive evidence that exercise alone can change the composition of microbes in the gut. The studies were designed to isolate exercise-induced changes from other factors -- such as diet or antibiotic use- - that might alter the intestinal microbiota. (2017-12-04)

Position statement: Avoid using medical marijuana to treat sleep apnea
Medical cannabis and synthetic marijuana extracts should not be used for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, according to a position statement from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). (2018-04-16)

Many postmenopausal women do not receive treatment for osteoporosis
The benefits of treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women outweigh the perceived risks, according to a Clinical Practice Guideline issued today by the Endocrine Society. The Society introduced the guideline during a news conference on Monday at ENDO 2019, its annual meeting in New Orleans, La. (2019-03-25)

Mayo-led study: Drug reduces hot flashes, improves breast cancer survivor quality of life
Research led by oncologists Roberto Leon-Ferre, M.D. and Charles Loprinzi, M.D. of Mayo Clinic has found that the drug oxybutynin helps to reduce the frequency and intensity of hot flashes in women who are unable to take hormone replacement therapy, including breast cancer survivors. These findings were presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2018-12-07)

Online physician reviews don't reflect responses in patient satisfaction surveys
Physicians who receive negative reviews online do not receive similar responses in rigorous patient satisfaction surveys, according to new Mayo Clinic research in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-04-02)

Genetic heart diseases cause fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought, study finds
Genetic mutations linked to heart disease have been considered a leading cause of sudden infant death syndrome, but a new study by Mayo Clinic, British and Danish researchers finds they are to blame for far fewer SIDS deaths than previously thought. The findings are opening new lines of inquiry into possible causes of the syndrome and may help prevent unnecessary genetic testing of surviving family members. The study results appear in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. (2018-03-12)

Preclinical study links gene to brain aneurysm formation
University of Cincinnati neurovascular researchers have identified a gene that -- when suppressed or completely absent -- may predispose a person to brain aneurysms. Todd Abruzzo, MD, and his colleagues demonstrated that (2007-08-07)

A breakthrough for brain tumor drug development
Glioblastoma is a devastating disease with poor survival stats due in part to a lack of preclinical models for new drug testing. To address these challenges a multidisciplinary team of researchers have developed a human relevant 3D model containing tumor and normal cells and a platform for accurate drug efficacy measurements. An experimental therapy doxorubicin (DOX) was tested and found to be more active in the model than the existing therapy. (2019-02-05)

Bedside art therapy decreases pain and anxiety in patients with cancer
A brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improved mood and reduced pain and anxiety in a study of inpatients with hematological cancers. (2018-04-19)

Stephanie Faubion, M.D., talks genitourinary syndrome of menopause
A new article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings reviews options for women going through genitourinary syndrome of menopause -- an encompassing term for vaginal dryness, itching, dyspareunia and urinary tract infections brought on by low estrogen levels after menopause. (2017-12-01)

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