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Popular Mayo Clinic News and Current Events, Mayo Clinic News Articles.
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Bedside art therapy decreases pain and anxiety in patients with cancer
A brief bedside visual art intervention (BVAI) facilitated by art educators improved mood and reduced pain and anxiety in a study of inpatients with hematological cancers. (2018-04-19)

Patients with blood cancer precursor at risk of developing cancer even after 30 years
Patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are at risk of progressing to multiple myeloma or a related cancer -- even after 30 years of stability. These are the findings of a study by Mayo Clinic researchers published in the Wednesday, Jan. 17, issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. (2018-01-17)

Researchers uncover how cancer stem cells drive triple-negative breast cancer
Cleveland Clinic researchers have published findings in Nature Communications on a new stem cell pathway that allows a highly aggressive form of breast cancer -- triple-negative breast cancer -- to thrive. (2018-02-08)

Stephanie Faubion, M.D., talks genitourinary syndrome of menopause
A new article in Mayo Clinic Proceedings reviews options for women going through genitourinary syndrome of menopause -- an encompassing term for vaginal dryness, itching, dyspareunia and urinary tract infections brought on by low estrogen levels after menopause. (2017-12-01)

Opioid controlled substance agreements safely reduce health care visits, Mayo study finds
The medical community has long known that patients on long-term opioid therapy often have significantly more health care visits. But adhering to a standardized care process model for opioid prescriptions appears to reduce the overall number of health care visits for these patients while maintaining safety, shows new research published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-09-20)

What role does the gut play in type 2 diabetes?
In the destructive cycle that leads to and perpetuates type 2 diabetes, driven by overeating, excessive blood glucose, defective pancreatic beta cell function, and imbalances in insulin-regulating hormone levels, the gut appears to play a key role. (2017-08-03)

Company-sponsored CRISPR clinical trials set to start in 2018
This year could be a defining one for CRISPR, the gene editing technique, which has been hailed as an important breakthrough in laboratory research. That's because the first company-sponsored clinical studies will be conducted to see if it can help treat diseases in humans, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News, the weekly news magazine of the American Chemical Society. (2018-01-10)

Researchers join forces to improve life for children with genetic disorder
The achievements of three girls who received intensive therapy through the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute's Neuromotor Research Clinic based on innovative pediatric neurorehabilitation research have been documented in a report published in BMC Research Notes. (2018-03-16)

Novel chip-based gene expression tool analyzes RNA quickly and accurately
A University of Illinois and Mayo collaboration has demonstrated a novel gene expression analysis technique that can accurately measure levels of RNA quickly and directly from a cancerous tissue sample while preserving the spatial information across the tissue -- something that conventional methods cannot do. (2018-01-17)

Engineers develop A.I. System to detect often-missed cancer tumors
Engineers at the University of Central Florida Center for Research in Computer Vision have taught a computer how to detect tiny specks of lung cancer in CT scans, which radiologists often have a difficult time identifying. The artificial intelligence system is about 95 percent accurate, compared to 65 percent when done by human eyes, the team said. (2018-08-22)

Scientists pinpoint gene to blame for poorer survival rate in early-onset breast cancer patients
A new study led by scientists at the University of Southampton has found that inherited variation in a particular gene may be to blame for the lower survival rate of patients diagnosed with early-onset breast cancer. (2017-12-14)

Mayo Clinic: New recommendations for use of bisphosphonates in treatment of multiple myeloma
Mayo Clinic's multiple myeloma (MM) research team has jointly issued a consensus statement regarding the use of bisphosphonates to prevent or treat bone disease in MM. Their recommendations address several controversial issues, including the type of bisphosphonate to be used and the duration of such therapy, and are available in the August issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2006-08-10)

Cleveland Clinic shows better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life
Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life, with no limit to the benefit of aerobic fitness. Researchers retrospectively studied 122,007 patients who underwent exercise treadmill testing at Cleveland Clinic between Jan. 1, 1991, and Dec. 31, 2014, to measure all-cause mortality relating to the benefits of exercise and fitness. The paper was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open. (2018-10-19)

Another test to help clinicians diagnose asthma more accurately
In order to assess the accuracy and reliability of a test that can be added to the clinician's toolbox to diagnose asthma -- fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) concentration -- researchers gathered and analyzed data from previous peer-reviewed studies. They conclude that the FeNO test has moderate accuracy for patients aged 5 and older. Their results are reported in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2017-12-21)

Health-related quality of life for patients with vascular malformations
Patients with vascular malformations, which include blood vessel, artery and lymph vessel abnormalities, appear to have more pain and mental health distress than the general US population and that can contribute to poor health-related quality of life. (2018-03-21)

Cancer immunotherapy found safe in patients with rheumatologic diseases
In the largest single-center study of patients with rheumatologic diseases who were prescribed modern cancer immunotherapy with what are called immune checkpoint inhibitors, only a minority of patients experienced a flare of their rheumatologic disease or immune-related side effects. (2018-01-24)

Most patients comfortable with sexual orientation and gender identity questions
New Mayo Clinic research suggests up to 97 percent of patients are comfortable with their health care provider asking sexual orientation and gender identity questions. Before this research, it was unclear if the questions - which researchers say are important to reduce health disparities among LGBTI patients -- would offend patients. The findings were published today in Health Services Research. (2018-03-09)

Prostate problems also associated with sleep disorders and depression
Men who suffer from urological problems such as erectile dysfunction, urinary tract and bladder problems or infertility issues often also suffer from depression and sleep disorders. Physicians should therefore be aware of these risks so that they can refer their patients to relevant specialists and provide comprehensive and timely care of male patients. This is according to Arman Walia of the University of California Irvine in the US, in a study in the Springer Nature-branded IJIR: Your Sexual Medicine Journal. (2018-08-31)

Mayo Clinic study finds heart transplant patients benefit from new approach to immunosuppression
A new immunosuppression regimen for heart transplant patients can improve kidney function and prevent transplant coronary artery disease, according to two new Mayo Clinic studies. Mayo researchers will report their findings on April 26 at the International Society for Heart & Lung Transplantation Annual Meeting and Scientific Session in San Francisco. (2007-04-26)

Less burnout seen among US physicians, Stanford researcher says
The epidemic levels of physicians reporting burnout dropped modestly in 2017, according to a study by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine, the Mayo Clinic and the American Medical Association. (2019-02-22)

NYU researchers demonstrate activity of mebendazole in metastatic melanoma
Researchers at the NYU Cancer Institute and the Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology have identified mebendazole, a drug used globally to treat parasitic infections, as a novel investigational agent for the treatment of chemotherapy-resistant malignant melanoma. (2008-08-07)

Mayo Clinic study: 20% of patients are prescribed opioids after cardiac device implantation surgery
One in five patients is prescribed opioids after having a pacemaker or similar device implanted, according to a large US study conducted at Mayo Clinic published in HeartRhythm. Eighty percent of patients who were prescribed opioids had never taken them before. Investigators stress the importance of improving postoperative pain management following cardiac device procedures to reduce use of prescription opioids. (2019-10-21)

Should hypothyroidism in pregnancy be treated?
When a woman becomes pregnant, many changes occur in her body. One of those changes is in the levels of various hormones produced by the body. (2017-01-25)

Tickling the brain with electrical stimulation improves memory, study shows
Tickling the brain with low-intensity electrical stimulation in a specific area can improve verbal short-term memory. Mayo Clinic researchers report their findings in Brain. (2018-01-29)

Senolytics improve health, extend life: Preclinical research findings
The presence of senescent or dysfunctional cells can make young mice age faster. And using senolytic drugs in elderly mice to remove these rogue cells can improve health and extend life. These findings from Mayo Clinic researchers and collaborators provide a foundation on which to move forward in this area of aging research. The results appear in Nature Medicine. (2018-07-09)

Mayo researchers: complementary therapies help patients recover after heart surgery
A new Mayo Clinic study shows that massage therapy decreases pain levels for patients after heart surgery. (2007-10-31)

JBMR perspective: A crisis in the treatment of osteoporosis
The remarkable progress made over the past 30 years to reduce fractures and dramatically improve the quality of life for millions of osteoporosis patients is rapidly being reversed, say two bone health experts in a Journal of Bone and Mineral Research article published online today. (2016-06-23)

Mayo Clinic study finds no evidence that anesthesia in young children lowers intelligence
A Mayo Clinic study finds no evidence that children given anesthesia before their third birthdays have lower IQs than those who did not have it. A more complex picture emerges among people who had anesthesia several times as small children: Although their intelligence is comparable, they score modestly lower on tests measuring fine motor skills, and their parents are more likely to report behavioral and learning problems. The findings are published in Anesthesiology. (2018-04-18)

High school athletes with shoulder instability benefit from nonoperative treatment
Nonoperative treatment of high school athletes with shoulder instability is an effective approach, according to research presented today at the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine's Specialty Day in New Orleans. Researchers also noted that using the Non-Operative Instability Severity Score (NSIS) tool can help identify higher-risk patients who may require other forms of treatment. (2018-03-10)

New position paper recommends treatment options for nightmare disorder in adults
A variety of treatment options may be effective for nightmare disorder in adults, according to a position paper from the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). (2018-06-14)

Assessing and addressing the impact of childhood trauma
People experiencing psychosis become more prone to experiencing unusual thoughts, beliefs, and experiences that make it harder to distinguish reality. For some people experiencing childhood trauma is linked to psychosis. A recent review, published in Frontiers in Psychiatry by Dr. Danessa Mayo and colleagues offers a model of the trauma-psychosis risk cycle that results from experiencing childhood trauma. In this model early childhood trauma interacts with a child's genetic vulnerability and propels some children toward psychosis. (2017-05-30)

Pregnant women with hypertension can safely monitor their blood pressure at home
A new Ultrasound in Obstetrics & Gynecology study provides evidence that pregnant women with hypertension can safely monitor their blood pressure at home instead of going into a hospital or clinic. This reduces the number of hospital visits without compromising their health of the health of their babies. (2018-02-22)

American adults have very low rate of metabolic health
A new study found that the prevalence of metabolic health is very low among American adults, even among those who have normal weight. (2018-11-28)

Trial reveals differences in pain-relieving drugs when combined with aspirin
A landmark 2016 Cleveland Clinic study of widely used pain-relieving drugs showed that celecoxib (Celebrex) was associated with comparable cardiovascular safety and better gastrointestinal (GI) and kidney safety when compared with either naproxen (Naprosyn) and ibuprofen (Motrin). A new substudy analyzed outcomes in PRECISION based on the presence or absence of aspirin use with specific NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). (2018-04-16)

Sensitive new assay finds abnormalities in tumor cells that other techniques may miss
RNA-Seq, a new next-generation assay, can detect gene fusions in solid tumor cells with high accuracy and excellent reproducibility. According to a new report in The Journal of Molecular Diagnostics, the assay detected 93 percent of gene fusions identified by currently available methods with no false positives. Importantly, gene fusions missed by other techniques were found, including 18 that had never been described before. This study paves the way for clinical use to advance the diagnosis and treatment of solid tumors. (2018-06-18)

Study shows hearing tests miss common form of hearing loss
Traditional clinical hearing tests often fail to diagnose patients with a common form of inner ear damage that might otherwise be detected by more challenging behavioral tests, according to the findings of a University at Buffalo-led study published in the journal Frontiers in Neuroscience. (2017-04-20)

A fat belly is bad for your heart
Belly fat, even in people who are not otherwise overweight, is bad for the heart, according to results from the Mayo Clinic presented today at EuroPrevent 2018, a European Society of Cardiology congress. (2018-04-20)

How exercise -- interval training in particular -- helps your mitochondria stave off old age
Researchers have long suspected that the benefits of exercise extend down to the cellular level, but know relatively little about which exercises help cells rebuild key organelles that deteriorate with aging. A study published in Cell Metabolism found that exercise -- and in particular high-intensity interval training in aerobic exercises such as biking and walking -- caused cells to make more proteins for their energy-producing mitochondria and their protein-building ribosomes, effectively stopping aging at the cellular level. (2017-03-07)

Mayo Clinic researchers uncover new agents
Mayo Clinic researchers have uncovered three new agents to add to the emerging repertoire of drugs that aim to delay the onset of aging by targeting senescent cells -- cells that contribute to frailty and other age-related conditions. (2017-03-08)

Innate immune system targets asthma-linked fungus for destruction
A new study shows that the innate immune system of humans is capable of killing a fungus linked to airway inflammation, chronic rhinosinusitis and bronchial asthma. Researchers at Mayo Clinic and the Virginia Bioinformatics Institute have revealed that eosinophils, a particular type of white blood cell, exert a strong immune response against the environmental fungus Alternaria alternata. (2008-09-02)

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