Popular Mayo Clinic News and Current Events | Page 3

Popular Mayo Clinic News and Current Events, Mayo Clinic News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 3 of 25 | 1000 Results
How exercise -- interval training in particular -- helps your mitochondria stave off old age
Researchers have long suspected that the benefits of exercise extend down to the cellular level, but know relatively little about which exercises help cells rebuild key organelles that deteriorate with aging. A study published in Cell Metabolism found that exercise -- and in particular high-intensity interval training in aerobic exercises such as biking and walking -- caused cells to make more proteins for their energy-producing mitochondria and their protein-building ribosomes, effectively stopping aging at the cellular level. (2017-03-07)

Novel imaging biomarker to help predict coronary inflammation
Researchers at Cleveland Clinic, University of Oxford and University of Erlangen have identified a novel imaging biomarker, which has been found to be able to predict all-cause and cardiac mortality by measuring inflammation of fatty tissue surrounding the coronary arteries. (2018-08-28)

Increase in heart rate as blood pressure falls could be early sign of neurological disease
A simple bedside test that matches a change in heart rate with a drop in blood pressure after a patient stands may help doctors diagnose certain degenerative brain diseases, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU School of Medicine. (2018-03-28)

Low health literacy associated with early death for cardiovascular patients
Patients hospitalized with a cardiovascular event are more likely to die within one year if they have low health literacy, according to a Vanderbilt University Medical Center study released today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-11-07)

Mayo Clinic finds 3 factors extend life for advanced pancreatic cancer patients
Historically, most pancreatic cancer patients whose tumors grow outside the pancreas to encompass veins and arteries have been told the cancer is inoperable and they should prepare for an average survival time of 12 to 18 months. (2019-04-02)

Re-introducing an 'old' antibiotic may help fight multi-drug resistant bacteria
A new study indicates that the drug fosfomycin may be effective for treating multidrug-resistant bacterial infections. In most European countries, the oral formulation is only approved as a 3 gram single dose for the treatment of uncomplicated cystitis; however the Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study found that a dosing regimen of 6-12 grams per day divided in 3 doses is required for the treatment of systemic multi-drug-resistant bacterial infections. (2018-02-07)

Mayo Clinic studies find association between acid reflux and esophageal cancer
Two new Mayo Clinic studies draw attention to the risk factors and possible genetic basis for Barrett's esophagus and esophageal cancer (adenocarcinoma). These studies will be presented Monday, May 22, and Tuesday, May 23, in Los Angeles at Digestive Disease Week® 2006. (2006-05-23)

Community-acquired pneumonia can spread year-round
New research indicates that community-acquired pneumonia should not be regarded as a seasonal disease, as it occurs throughout all seasons; however, the pathogens that cause the condition are clearly subject to seasonal variations. (2017-01-17)

Up to half of childhood cancer survivors will develop hormone disorders
The Endocrine Society today issued a Clinical Practice Guideline advising healthcare providers on how to diagnose and treat the endocrine disorders that affect a significant portion of childhood cancer survivors in the United States today. (2018-06-29)

Using artificial intelligence to deliver personalized radiation therapy
New Cleveland Clinic-led research shows that artificial intelligence (AI) can use medical scans and health records to personalize the dose of radiation therapy used to treat cancer patients. Published today in The Lancet Digital Health, the research team developed an AI framework based on patient computerized tomography (CT) scans and electronic health records. (2019-06-27)

Gold standard monitoring of HCC in patients with cirrhosis is cost-effective
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the leading cause of death in patients with cirrhosis. A new analysis indicates that following screening guidelines for HCC in cirrhotic patients is lifesaving and cost-effective compared with 'real life' monitoring. (2017-02-08)

Google search data shows weight loss searches have increased over time while those on obesity have decreased
New research on Google trends data presented at this year's European Congress on Obesity in Vienna, Austria (May 23-26) shows that over time, searches using the terms weight loss have increased, while those using the word obesity have decreased, potentially suggesting a normalization of obesity in society. (2018-05-25)

American Federation for Aging Research experts featured in PBS special: Incredible Aging
Fourteen AFAR experts are among those featured in (2018-03-14)

Adding epratuzumab to standard therapy
Adding a second monoclonal antibody drug to chemotherapy looks promising for treatment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, according to Mayo Clinic researchers working with the North Central Cancer Treatment Group. (2008-05-15)

Americans concerned about weight, but don't understand link to heart conditions, health
A Cleveland Clinic survey finds that while most Americans (88 percent) understand that there is a connection between a healthy heart and a healthy weight, most aren't doing enough -- or anything -- to combat their own weight issues. The survey found 65 percent are worried about getting heart disease due to extra pounds, yet less than half (43 percent) of Americans have tried to make dietary changes to lose weight. (2019-01-31)

New oral anticoagulant drugs associated with lower kidney risks
Mayo Clinic researchers have shown a link between which type of oral anticoagulant (blood-thinning medication) a patient takes to prevent a stroke and increased risks of kidney function decline or failure. (2017-11-20)

Biologists identify gene involved in kidney-related birth defects
A team led by University of Iowa researchers has identified a gene linked to rare kidney-related birth defects. When working properly, a gene called GREB1L activates a cascade of signals that ultimately tells other genes what they need to do to create a kidney. Results published in the journal Genetics. (2017-09-18)

Be a control freak: Allergists outline new focus for asthmatics
A Mayo Clinic allergist and colleagues representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology announce they are revising the old classification of asthma patients by disease severity to determine treatment and moving to a new expectation for all asthma patients: excellent symptom control. (2005-10-24)

Mayo Clinic researchers clarify chemo resistance, and perhaps a new therapy
Mayo Clinic scientists have identified a specific protein implicated in drug resistance, as well as a possible therapeutic tool. Their work appears in the EMBO Journal. (2017-03-09)

Stand up -- it could help you lose weight
You might want to read this on your feet. A new study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology found that standing instead of sitting for six hours a day could prevent weight gain and help people to actually lose weight. (2018-01-31)

Ovarian cancer drug shows promise in pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutation
A targeted therapy that has shown its power in fighting ovarian cancer in women including those with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may also help patients with aggressive pancreatic cancer who harbor these mutations and have few or no other treatment options. (2018-05-17)

Nearly half of resident physicians report burnout
Resident physician burnout in the US is widespread, with the highest rates concentrated in certain specialties, according to research from Mayo Clinic, OHSU and collaborators. (2018-09-18)

Mayo Clinic researchers identify therapy
Mayo Clinic researchers have found that an experimental drug, LCL161, stimulates the immune system, leading to tumor shrinkage in patients affected by multiple myeloma. The findings are published in Nature Medicine. (2017-03-08)

Satellites to see Mercury enter spotlight on May 9
It happens only a little more than once a decade and the next chance to see it is Monday, May 9, 2016. Throughout the US, sky watchers can watch Mercury pass between Earth and the sun in a rare astronomical event known as a planetary transit. Three NASA satellites will be providing images of the transit and one of them will have a near-live feed. (2016-05-03)

Early results from clinical trials not all they're cracked up to be, shows new research
When people are suffering from a chronic medical condition, they may place their hope on treatments in clinical trials that show early positive results. However, these results may be grossly exaggerated in more than 1 in 3 early clinical trials, reports a new study led by Mayo Clinic and published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings. (2018-02-21)

Physicians and burnout: It's getting worse
Burnout among US physicians is getting worse. An update from a three-year study evaluating burnout and work-life balance shows that American physicians are worse off today than they were three years earlier. (2015-12-01)

Does your back feel stiff? Well, it may not actually be stiff, UAlberta study finds
Feeling of stiffness may mean something else is going on in the back. (2017-09-26)

Research connects first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease
Mayo Clinic nephrologists have uncovered a connection between first-time kidney stone formers and chronic kidney disease. In a paper published today in Mayo Clinic Proceedings, researchers announce a persistent decline in kidney functioning following an individual's first case of kidney stones. (2016-11-02)

Coal ash selenium found in fish in N.C. lakes
A new Duke study has found high levels of selenium in the tissues of fish in North Carolina lakes that receive coal ash effluents from power plants. Concentrations of selenium exceeding EPA-recommended thresholds for aquatic health were found in the liver, muscle, ovary and testes tissues of the fish, as well as in bottom waters at two of the lakes, despite the fact that selenium inputs have decreased or stopped in recent years. (2017-02-07)

Uncovering the power of glial cells
Implanted devices send targeted electrical stimulation to the nervous system to interfere with abnormal brain activity, and it is commonly assumed that neurons are the only important brain cells that need to be stimulated by these devices. However, research published in Nature Biomedical Engineering reveals that it may also be important to target the supportive glial cells surrounding the neurons. (2018-01-08)

Genetic analysis has potential to transform diagnosis and treatment of adults with liver disease of unknown cause
Adults suffering from liver disease of unknown cause represent an understudied and underserved patient population. A new study reported in the Journal of Hepatology, published by Elsevier, supports the incorporation of whole-exome sequencing (WES) in the diagnosis and management of adults suffering from unexplained liver disease and underscores its value in developing an understanding of which liver phenotypes of unknown cause in adults are genetic. (2019-04-15)

Elagolix reduces menstrual bleeding from most common uterine tumors
A new oral drug significantly reduced menstrual bleeding for women with the most common gynecologic tumors in the United States - benign tumors that disproportionately affect African-Americans, an international clinical trial found. (2018-11-09)

Toxic protein, linked to Alzheimer's and neurodegenerative diseases, exposed in new detail
The protein tau has long been implicated in Alzheimer's and a host of other debilitating brain diseases. But scientists have struggled to understand exactly how tau converts from its normal, functional form into a misfolded, harmful one. By analyzing brain tissue from patients, researchers have revealed that modifications to the tau protein may influence what type of disease that will develop -- and how quickly that disease will spread throughout the brain. (2020-02-06)

Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center experts present data at 2018 ASCO Annual Meeting
At the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Annual Meeting in Chicago, researchers from Cleveland Clinic Cancer Center will present data from several new studies, including a prospective clinical trial examining non-small cell lung cancer cells' response to immunotherapy; research on germline testing for melanoma; and interim results from a study testing a vaccine for glioblastoma. (2018-06-01)

Study finds more than 40 percent of prostate biopsies could be avoided with new blood test
A multi-center study that validates the clinical performance of IsoPSA -- a new blood test that has proven to be more accurate in predicting overall risk of prostate cancer than standard prostate-specific antigen (PSA) -- will be presented during the AUA Annual Meeting this weekend in San Francisco. Results suggest that use of IsoPSA may substantially reduce the need for biopsy, and may thus lower the likelihood of overdetection and overtreatment of nonlethal prostate cancer. (2018-05-18)

Moderate alcohol consumption may boost male fertility
The question of whether alcohol intake affects male reproductive function is controversial. In a new Andrology study, moderate alcohol intake was linked with higher semen volume, sperm concentration, and total sperm count. (2018-07-18)

New guideline: Try exercise to improve memory, thinking
For patients with mild cognitive impairment, don't be surprised if your health care provider prescribes exercise rather than medication. A new guideline for medical practitioners says they should recommend twice-weekly exercise to people with mild cognitive impairment to improve memory and thinking. (2017-12-27)

Assessment of comatose patients through telemedicine efforts shown to be reliable
Reliable assessment of comatose patients in intensive care units is critical to the patients' care. Providers must recognize clinical status changes quickly to undertake proper interventions. But does the provider need to be in the same room as the patient, or can robotic telemedicine be used successfully to complete the assessment? According to a research study conducted at Mayo Clinic Hospital in Arizona, published in Telemedicine and e-Health, the answer is yes. (2017-01-26)

Energy density: a new way to look at food
Just in time for New Year's resolutions, a new book from Mayo Clinic is available to help potential dieters stay on track. The book, Mayo Clinic on Healthy Weight, recommends paying close attention to the (2001-01-04)

Mayo Clinic study: Anesthesia, surgery linked to decline in memory and thinking
In adults over 70, exposure to general anesthesia and surgery is associated with a subtle decline in memory and thinking skills, according to new Mayo Clinic research. The study analyzed nearly 2,000 participants in the Mayo Clinic Study of Aging and found that exposure to anesthesia after age 70 was linked to long-term changes in brain function. The results appear in the British Journal of Anaesthesia. (2018-07-19)

Page 3 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.