Popular Medical Devices News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Medical Devices News and Current Events, Medical Devices News Articles.
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Big energy savings: OSU researchers build the world's smallest electro-optic modulator
Researchers at have designed and fabricated the world's smallest electro-optic modulator, which could mean major reductions in energy used by data centers and supercomputers. (2018-01-22)

In first, 3-D printed objects connect to WiFi without electronics
UW engineers have developed the first 3-D printed plastic objects that can connect to other devices via WiFi without using any electronics, including a laundry bottle that can detect when soap is running low and automatically order more. (2017-12-05)

Game changer for organic solar cells
Researchers develop a simple processing technique that could cut the cost of organic photovoltaics and wearable electronics. (2016-12-05)

Telemonitoring in cardiac disorders: Benefit still unclear
The data showed no relevant differences for some outcome criteria, and data were missing for others -- also because some studies remain incompletely published. (2018-03-09)

A new technology for producing nano-hydroxyapatite developed by Lobachevsky University chemists
Today, deterioration of human health is one of the most pressing problems that modern medicine is facing. First of all, it concerns the widespread degradation of hard tissues -- bones and teeth. To solve this problem, it is necessary to create medical materials capable of restoring the structure of hard tissues. The chemical basis of such materials is provided by hydroxyapatite, an inorganic compound, which is one of the main components of bones and teeth. (2017-12-12)

Turning background room temperature heat into energy
University of Tsukuba-based researchers developed a way to recover environmental heat with a new type of thin-film thermoelectric cell, based on two different materials that show changes in their redox potential on cycling of temperature. (2018-02-14)

Researchers develop flexible, stretchable photonic devices
Researchers at MIT and elsewhere have developed a way to make optically based microchips that can flex and bend like rubber and could be used for skin-mounted diagnostics or flexible strain sensors. (2017-11-08)

Repetition key to self-healing, flexible medical devices
Medical devices powered by synthetic proteins created from repeated sequences of proteins may be possible, according to materials science and biotechnology experts, who looked at material inspired by the proteins in squid ring teeth. (2018-02-08)

Reading on electronic devices may interfere with science reading comprehension
People who often read on electronic devices may have a difficult time understanding scientific concepts, according to a team of researchers. They suggest that this finding, among others in the study, could also offer insights on how reading a scientific text differs from casual reading. (2017-12-06)

Silicon breakthrough could make key microwave technology much cheaper and better
Researchers using powerful supercomputers have found a way to generate microwaves with inexpensive silicon, a breakthrough that could dramatically cut costs and improve devices such as sensors in self-driving vehicles. (2018-05-24)

Researchers develop graphene nano 'tweezers' that can grab individual biomolecules
Researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphene -- tiny electronic 'tweezers' that can grab biomolecules floating in water with incredible efficiency. This capability could lead to a revolutionary handheld disease diagnostic system that could be run on a smart phone. (2017-12-01)

Graphene biosensor could provide early lung cancer diagnosis, research shows
The wonder-material graphene could hold the key to unlocking the next generation of advanced, early stage lung cancer diagnosis. (2019-02-04)

Sound Off! The Navy, haring protection and mobile devices
The Office of Naval Research is sponsoring the development of a new app to help warfighters learn about hearing protection on their mobile Android devices -- and snap close-up selfies of themselves wearing earplugs to see if they're using them properly. (2017-01-31)

Organic semiconductors: One transistor for all purposes
In mobiles, fridges, planes - transistors are everywhere. But they often operate only within a restricted current range. Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich physicists have now developed an organic transistor that functions perfectly under both low and high currents. (2019-03-21)

Study shows need for adaptive powered knee prosthesis to assist amputees
New North Carolina State University research into wearable robotics shows how amputees wearing these devices adapted when presented with a real-world challenge: carrying a weighted backpack. The results could assist device manufacturers and clinicians expand the utility of these important devices, and could help researchers develop smarter controllers that adapt to real-world demands. (2017-11-03)

A solar cell you can put in the wash
Scientists from RIKEN and the University of Tokyo have developed a new type of ultra-thin photovoltaic device, coated on both sides with stretchable and waterproof films, which can continue to provide electricity from sunlight even after being soaked in water or being stretched and compressed. (2017-09-18)

Berkeley engineers build smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulator
Berkeley engineers have taken their neural dust invention a step forward by building the smallest volume, most efficient wireless nerve stimulator to date. (2018-04-10)

NUS engineers invent smart microchip that can self-start and operate when battery runs out
BATLESS, a smart microchip developed by a team of researchers led by Associate Professor Massimo Alioto from National University of Singapore's Faculty of Engineering, can self-start and continue to operate even when the battery runs out of energy. This novel technology could enable smaller and cheaper Internet of Things (IoT) devices. (2018-05-03)

New technique allows printing of flexible, stretchable silver nanowire circuits
Researchers have developed a new technique that allows them to print circuits on flexible, stretchable substrates using silver nanowires. The advance makes it possible to integrate the material into a wide array of electronic devices. (2018-02-26)

Technology not taking over children's lives despite screen-time increase
With children spending increasing amounts of time on screen-based devices, there is a common perception that technology is taking over their lives, to the detriment and exclusion of other activities. However, new Oxford University research has revealed that as digital pasttimes have become intertwined with daily life, children have adapted their behaviours to include their devices. Much like adults, they are able to multi-task and also do all the things that they would do anyway. (2017-12-21)

New method for waking up devices
A device that's turned off doesn't suck battery life, but it also doesn't work. Now a low-power system that's always on the alert can turn devices on when they are needed, saving energy in the networked internet of things. (2018-02-12)

Can your cardiac device be hacked?
Medical devices, including cardiovascular implantable electronic devices could be at risk for hacking. In a paper publishing online today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology, the American College of Cardiology's Electrophysiology Council examines the potential risk to patients and outlines how to improve cybersecurity in these devices. (2018-02-20)

Splitting crystals for 2-D metallic conductivity
Adding oxygen atoms to a perovskite-like crystal material splits it into layers, giving it unique electrical properties. (2018-02-20)

Discovery of graphene switch
Researchers at Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (JAIST) successfully developed the special in-situ transmission electron microscope technique to measure the current-voltage curve of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) with observing the edge structure and found that the electrical conductance of narrow GNRs with a zigzag edge structure abruptly increased above the critical bias voltage, indicating that which they are expected to be applied to switching devices, which are the smallest in the world. (2020-06-15)

Stretchable silicon could be next wave in electronics
The next wave in electronics could be wavy electronics. Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a fully stretchable form of single-crystal silicon with micron-sized, wave-like geometries that can be used to build high-performance electronic devices on rubber substrates. (2005-12-15)

Engineering electron pathways in 2-D-topological insulators
In a recent article published in Physical Review Letters researchers from CIC nanoGUNE, the Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics of Oxford, together with colleagues from Wuerzburg and Stanford University reported new insight into the electronic conduction and interference on 2-D-topological insulators -- an exotic kind of insulators that conduct only at the edge and that could be key for the development of a new generation of electronic devices. (2017-12-01)

Organic electronics can use power from socket
Organic light-emitting devices and printed electronics can be connected to a socket in the wall by way of a small, inexpensive organic converter, developed in a collaboration between Linköping University and Umeå University. (2017-03-21)

Feinstein Institute study looks at impact of a popular pre-heart transplant therapy on the kidney
Scientists, nephrologists and cardiac surgeons from The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research and Northwell Health's Department of Internal Medicine, Cardiology and Cardio-Thoracic Surgery examined the impact of a popular pre-heart transplant therapy on the kidney in a study published today by The Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology. (2017-10-25)

Bright future for self-charging batteries
Who hasn't lived through the frustrating experience of being without a phone after forgetting to recharge it? This could one day be a thing of the past thanks to technology being developed by Hydro-Québec and McGill University. (2017-04-24)

Spin current detection in quantum materials unlocks potential for alternative electronics
A new method that precisely measures the mysterious behavior and magnetic properties of electrons flowing across the surface of quantum materials could open a path to next-generation electronics. A team of scientists has developed an innovative microscopy technique to detect the spin of electrons in topological insulators, a new kind of quantum material that could be used in applications such as spintronics and quantum computing. (2017-10-13)

Lobachevsky University researchers obtain magnetic semiconductor layers of a new type
Researchers at the laboratory of spin and optical electronics of the Lobachevsky University (Nizhny Novgorod, Russia) have obtained a new type of magnetic semiconductor layers, which demonstrate spin-dependent phenomena in the transport of charge carriers at room temperature. (2018-01-22)

Implantable medical devices bolstered by next-gen surface modification
A discovery by Australian researchers could underpin a new class of implantable devices that provide biological signals to surrounding tissue for better integration with the body and reduced risk of infection. The team has developed low-cost, practical techniques to guide and attach peptides to surfaces. Medicine increasingly relies on biomedical devices but their effectiveness is often limited because of unsuccessful integration with the host, necessitating replacement through revision surgery, or the development of untreatable infections. (2018-01-24)

Design for magnetoelectric device may improve your memory
Conventional memory devices use transistors and rely on electric fields to store and read out information. An alternative approach uses magnetic fields, and a promising version relies on the magnetoelectric effect which allows an electric field to switch the magnetic properties of the devices. Existing devices, however, tend to require large magnetic and electric fields. One potential solution is a new switching element made from chromia. The researchers report their findings in Applied Physics Letters. (2018-05-04)

Stacking on the graphene
Tohoku University researchers have fabricated two types of trilayer graphene with different electrical properties. (2018-02-09)

Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabric
Researchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques. (2017-11-08)

Essential oils to fight bacterial infections
James Cook University scientists in Australia have discovered a technique to apply natural plant extracts such as Tea Tree Oil as a coating for medical devices, a process which could prevent millions of infections every year. (2018-06-07)

A new approach to ultrafast light pulses
A team of MIT researchers and others has found a new way of producing high-speed pulses of light using two-dimensional molecular aggregates, which could enable new photonic devices such as optically based microchips. (2017-09-18)

When it comes to antennas, size matters
In a paper published online in Nature Communications, Nian Sun, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Northeastern, and his colleagues describe a new approach to designing antennas. The discovery enables researchers to construct antennas that are up to a thousand times smaller than currently available antennas, Sun said. (2017-08-29)

Rutgers researchers create a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater, moves objects
Rutgers University-New Brunswick engineers have created a 3D-printed smart gel that walks underwater and grabs objects and moves them. The watery creation could lead to soft robots that mimic sea animals like the octopus, which can walk underwater and bump into things without damaging them. It may also lead to artificial heart, stomach and other muscles, along with devices for diagnosing diseases, detecting and delivering drugs and performing underwater inspections. (2018-05-18)

Successful implantation of heart pump with power cable behind the ear, a Japan first!
In March 2017, the Cardiovascular Surgery Group at Osaka University successfully implanted a left ventricular assist device with an internal power cable tunneled through the neck to the head in a patient who was ineligible for a cardiac transplantation, destination therapy (DT) trial, a Japan first. The patient was recently discharged. (2017-12-04)

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