Popular Medical Errors News and Current Events

Popular Medical Errors News and Current Events, Medical Errors News Articles.
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All too human
Professor Rony Paz of the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that our brains are like modern washing machines -- evolved to have the latest sophisticated programming, but more vulnerable to breakdown and prone to develop costly disorders. He and a group of researchers recently conducted experiments comparing the efficiency of the neural code in non-human and human primates, and found that as the neural code gets more efficient, the robustness that prevents errors is reduced. (2019-01-22)

How human eggs end up with the wrong number of chromosomes
One day before ovulation, human oocytes begin to divide into what will become mature eggs. Ideally, eggs are packaged with a complete set of 23 chromosomes, but the process is prone to error, especially with age. In a Review in Trends in Cell Biology, researchers discuss the latest research on why many human oocytes frequently have a wrong number of chromosomes -- which may lead to genetic disorders, such as Down syndrome and miscarriage. (2016-10-20)

Mental health issues linked to risky driving in newly licensed teens
Mental health symptoms related to attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and conduct disorder are associated with increased errors in a driving simulator and self-reported risky driving behaviors in adolescents, according to study in Nursing Research, published by Wolters Kluwer. (2018-03-27)

Sensitivity to time improves performance at remotely controlling devices
A new study finds that people who are more sensitive to the passage of time are better at accounting for the latency -- or time lag -- inherent in remotely controlling robots or other tools. (2017-10-06)

Growing and surviving: How proteins regulate the cell cycle
Cell division is the basis of all life. Even the smallest errors in this complex process can lead to grave diseases like cancer. Certain proteins have to be switched on or off at certain times for everything to go according to plan. Biophysicists and medical biochemists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have managed to describe the underlying mechanism of this process. (2018-03-23)

Muscle vibrations improve control over prosthetic hands
An automated brain-computer interface that vibrates the muscles used for control of prosthetic hands helped three amputees gain better movement control over the prosthetic, according to a new study by Paul Marasco and colleagues. (2018-03-14)

How quickly can children learn routes?
New research from the University of Liverpool suggests that children as young as eight can learn a route after only a single experience of it. (2018-01-09)

New insights into leading cause of miscarriage, birth defects discovered
Ten to 25 percent of human embryos contain the wrong number of chromosomes, resulting in miscarriage or birth defects such as Down syndrome. The incidence of these errors rises dramatically as women age. Two recent Northwestern University studies shed new light on the mystery of the leading cause of birth defects and miscarriage, laying the foundation for further research in an understudied but crucially important field of genetic study. (2017-10-02)

New study shows electronic health records often capture incomplete mental health data
This study compares information available in a typical electronic health record (EHR) with data from insurance claims, focusing on diagnoses, visits, and hospital care for depression and bipolar disorder. (2016-04-21)

DNA barcodes that reliably work: A game-changer for biomedical research
Researchers have developed a new method for correcting the errors that creep into DNA barcodes -- labels used in a wide range of biological experiments -- yielding far more accurate results and paving the way for more ambitious medical research in the future. (2018-06-20)

Early use of 'hurricane hunter' data improves hurricane intensity predictions
Data collected via airplane when a hurricane is developing can improve hurricane intensity predictions by up to 15 percent, according to Penn State researchers who have been working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the National Hurricane Center to put the new technique into practice. (2016-05-25)

How far to go for satellite cloud image forecasting into operation
Simulated satellite cloud images not only have the visualization of cloud imagery, but also can reflect more information about the model. Using the atmospheric radiation transfer model and high-resolution numerical weather forecast results, researchers from Beijing have achieved the FY-2D infrared bright-temperature simulation and also studied the impact of errors in macro and micro cloud parameters predicted by model on the simulation accuracy of brightness temperature. (2018-05-15)

Protecting those on the frontline from Ebola
Online training developed at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) increased the knowledge of health care workers about effective prevention of Ebola up to 19 percent and reduced critical errors to 2.3 percent in a small MUSC cohort. These findings, published in Health Security, suggest that the program could improve protection of health care workers from Ebola and, because it will be easily accessible via the Internet, could be especially useful in low-resource settings. (2019-02-01)

Serious mortuary errors could be reduced by applying common patient safety protocols
New research investigating serious incidents occurring in the management of patient remains after their death concludes that safe mortuary care may be improved by applying lessons learned from existing patient safety work. (2017-11-23)

Error-free into the quantum computer age
A study led by physicists at Swansea University in Wales, carried out by an international team of researchers and published in the journal Physical Review X shows that ion-trap technologies available today are suitable for building large-scale quantum computers. The scientists introduce trapped-ion quantum error correction protocols that detect and correct processing errors. (2017-12-15)

A mutational timer is built into the chemistry of DNA
Scientists have discovered that DNA contains a kind of built-in timer that clocks the frequency with which mutations occur. They show that DNA bases can shape-shift for a thousandth of a second, transiently morphing into alternative states that allow the molecule's replication machinery to incorporate the wrong base pairs into its double helix. Such mismatches, though rare, serve as the basis of genetic changes that drive evolution and diseases like cancer. (2018-01-31)

Mass. panel reviews cataract surgery adverse events, makes recommendations for prevention
A team of specialists in anesthesiology, ophthalmology and patient safety convened in response to a series of injuries to patients receiving cataract surgery has reported its findings regarding factors contributing to those and other adverse events and strategies for preventing patient harm in such procedures. (2017-11-10)

Medication errors for admitted patients drop when pharmacy staff take drug histories in ER
When pharmacy professionals -- rather than doctors or nurses -- take medication histories of patients in emergency departments, mistakes in drug orders can be reduced by more than 80 percent, according to a study led by Cedars-Sinai. (2017-12-04)

Looking for the quantum frontier
Researchers have developed a new theoretical framework to identify computations that occupy the 'quantum frontier' -- the boundary at which problems become impossible for today's computers and can only be solved by a quantum computer. The team, whose work was highlighted in the first edition of Quantum journal this week, demonstrate that these computations can be performed with near-term, intermediate, quantum computers. (2017-04-27)

Modern security technology in Intel processors not watertight
Technology giant Intel has been including an innovative security method in its processors for a number of years. This method works as a vault for your personal data. However, KU Leuven researchers (Belgium) have shown that the system can, in fact, be hacked using the Foreshadow attack. What's more, information processed in cloud systems also seems vulnerable to this kind of attack. Intel will be releasing patches to resolve the flaw in millions of processors. (2018-08-14)

What is the cost of interrupting a radiologist?
A first of its kind study shows typical interruptions experienced by on-call radiologists do not reduce diagnostic accuracy but do change what they look at and increase the amount of time spent on a case. (2018-03-19)

Diagnosing the impacts of health policy
KAUST shows a new statistical technique offers a better way to gauge the effectiveness of complex healthcare interventions. (2017-11-20)

Going beyond 'human error'
A human factors study using Bayes' theorem and content analysis reveals underlying teamwork, organizational, and technological influences on severe US Naval aviation mishaps. (2018-04-30)

What impact do medication errors have on nursing home residents?
A new analysis points to surprisingly low rates of serious impacts from medication errors affecting nursing home residents, despite the fact that these errors remain fairly common. The investigators noted that it's unclear whether medication errors resulting in serious outcomes are truly infrequent or are under-reported due to the difficulty in ascertaining them. The findings are published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2016-11-21)

Ladies, this is why fertility declines with age
Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM) have discovered a possible new explanation for female infertility. Thanks to cutting-edge microscopy techniques, they observed for the first time a specific defect in the eggs of older mice. This defect may also be found in the eggs of older women. The choreography of cell division goes awry, and causes errors in the sharing of chromosomes. These unprecedented observations are being published today in Current Biology. (2017-04-03)

Yale team's advance allows gene editing with surgical precision
Yale researchers report they have created a more precise and efficient technology to edit the genomes of living organisms, an ability that is transforming medicine and biotechnology. The new method, described Nov. 16 in the journal Cell, eliminates some of the drawbacks of genome editing technologies, which enables scientists to insert or eliminate genes within DNA. (2017-11-16)

Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle Ages
In the Middle Ages, did contracting leprosy necessarily increase a person's chances of dying? Yes, says a new paper. But it's complicated. (2017-10-03)

Maternal mortality rates are on the rise, but more accurate estimates are needed
A new Birth analysis has uncovered dramatic increases in the rates of maternal mortality -- the death of a mother during pregnancy, childbirth, or post-partum -- in Texas in recent years. There was an 87 percent increase when comparing 2011-2015 data with 2006-2010 data. Some of the increase is likely due to increased overreporting of maternal deaths due to errors in the data collection system, however. (2018-01-04)

New method identifies splicing biomarkers for liver cancer
other cancer types. The Takeaway: Researchers have developed a method for identifying a new kind of biomarker for liver cancer and possibly other cancers, based on spotting variations in the way RNA messages copied from genes are edited, or spliced. (2018-03-02)

Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers identify health conditions likely to be misdiagnosed
For a patient, a diagnostic error can mean the difference between life and death. While estimates vary, likely more than 100,000 Americans die or are permanently disabled each year due to medical diagnoses that initially miss conditions or are wrong or delayed. (2019-07-11)

A method to measure diagnostic errors could be key to preventing disability and death from misdiagnosis
In an effort to reduce patient misdiagnoses and associated poor patient outcomes from lack of prompt treatment, a Johns Hopkins Armstrong Institute for Patient Safety and Quality researcher is helping to lead the way in providing hospitals a new approach to quantify and monitor diagnostic errors in their quality improvement efforts. The approach, called Symptom-Disease Pair Analysis of Diagnostic Error, or SPADE, is featured in a paper published today in BMJ Quality & Safety. (2018-01-22)

Training trials
First national study shows cutting residents' training hours has not resulted in lower performance for new doctors. Resident training was capped at 80 hours per week in 2003, down from 100+ hours, a controversial move that left many worried. Despite worries, reduced hours did not change 30-day patient mortality, readmissions or spending. (2019-07-11)

Medical errors may stem more from physician burnout than unsafe health care settings
Physician burnout is at least equally responsible for medical errors as unsafe medical workplace conditions, if not more so, according to a study led by researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine. (2018-07-09)

Testosterone limits for female athletes based on 'flawed' research
New rules governing international track and field competitions would require some women to medically reduce their testosterone levels to compete. A new study suggests the regulations are rooted in flawed science. (2019-02-12)

Localized orbital scaling correction functional ushering DFT to a new level of accuracy
Delocalization error is one of the dominant errors that impair density functional approximations, and responsible for the errors in energy level alignment, charge transfer and band gap predictions. Eliminating delocalization error has been the most challenging open problem. Recently, researchers based in US and China have developed a localized orbital scaling correction framework that systematically eliminates delocalization error. Their non-traditional approach also broadens the way in developing density functional approximations for the new generation. (2017-09-13)

Checklists in the operating room: More safety for patients
The use of the World Health Organization's Surgical Safety Checklist in the operating room considerably lowers the risks of surgery. This is the conclusion of Axel Fudickar and co-authors in their article in Issue 42 of Deutsches Ärzteblatt International. (2012-11-05)

Penn engineering research gives optical switches the 'contrast' of electronic transistors
Penn Engineers have taken an important step toward the creation of a working optical transistor: precisely controlling the mixing of optical signals via tailored electric fields, and obtaining outputs with a near perfect contrast and extremely large on/off ratios. (2018-01-31)

Researchers examine how errors affect credibility of online reviews
Shoppers increasingly consult online reviews before making holiday purchases. But how do they decide which reviewers to trust? Recently published research from the Indiana University Kelley School of Business at IUPUI shows that consumer trust in online reviews is influenced by spelling errors and typos. But how much those errors influence each consumer depends on the type of error and that consumer's general tendency to trust others. (2017-12-11)

Many clinical trial status discrepancies identified between ClinicalTrials.gov and EUCTR
Approximately one-sixth of clinical trials registered on both ClinicalTrials.gov and the EU Clinical Trials Register (EUCTR) have discrepancies in their completion status, according to a study published March 7, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Jessica Fleminger and Ben Goldacre from the University of Oxford, UK. (2018-03-07)

Electronic health records may lower malpractice settlements
Use of electronic health records may help reduce paid malpractice settlements for physicians. (2008-11-25)

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