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Popular Medication News and Current Events, Medication News Articles.
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Antidepressant use increases hip fracture risk among elderly
Antidepressant use nearly doubles the risk of hip fracture among community-dwelling persons with Alzheimer's disease, according to a new study from the University of Eastern Finland. The increased risk was highest at the beginning of antidepressant use and remained elevated even four years later. The findings were published in the International Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry. (2017-01-11)

Study examines differences in hip fracture rates among nursing homes
In a nationally representative study, researchers found considerable variation in the rates of hip fractures across US nursing home facilities. The Journal of the American Geriatrics Society study identified a number of modifiable facility-level characteristics that might be addressed, but the majority of the variation in the risk of hip fracture remained unexplained. (2018-01-22)

Cancer patients can quit smoking through lengthened medication time, counseling support
More than 50 percent of cancer patients still smoke after being diagnosed, yet quitting smoking can significantly improve the effectiveness of cancer treatment. A new study from Northwestern Medicine and the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania found cancer patients have better success quitting and are not as prone to relapsing one year later if they undergo counseling sessions for 24 weeks and take the smoking cessation medication varenicline (e.g. Chantix) for 24 weeks, compared to the routine 12 weeks. (2019-01-25)

Psychiatric diagnoses and medication use in children insured by Medicaid
Young children insured by Medicaid with a psychiatric diagnosis had early and prolonged exposure to psychotropic medications. (2018-04-30)

Dietary supplement may help with schizophrenia
A dietary supplement, sarcosine, may help with schizophrenia as part of a holistic approach complementing antipsychotic medication, according to a UCL researcher. (2019-09-09)

RNs can play key role in identifying medication issues to improve nursing home care
Amy Vogelsmeier, associate professor of nursing, found that registered nurses are better equipped to identify medication discrepancies that could cause nursing home residents harm. (2017-11-03)

Childhood methylphenidate treatment predicts antidepressant use during adolescence
A new, 12-year longitudinal study, which monitored 6,830 children from early childhood into adolescence, has shown that consistent treatment with MPH-based medications during childhood increases the risk of antidepressant use during adolescence. The study is the first of its kind to examine the connection between children diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed MPH between the ages of six and eight, and future dispensed prescriptions of antidepressants. (2019-03-27)

Obesity surgery linked to positive outcomes in very obese teens with diabetes
This study is the first to compare glycemic control in two groups of very obese adolescents with type 2 diabetes. It included 30 teenagers treated with medication (TODAY) and 63 teenagers who underwent bariatric surgery (Teen-LABs). (2018-03-22)

New details in schizophrenia treatment trial emerge
Two new studies from the CATIE trial provide more insights into comparing treatment options, and to what extent antipsychotic medications help people with schizophrenia learn social, interpersonal and psychosocial skills. Quetiapine, and to some extent olanzapine, may be more effective than risperidone among patients who were originally taking, but had to discontinue, perphenazine -- an older, first generation antipsychotic medication. Patients taking antipsychotic medications, regardless of type, experience modest improvements in social, interpersonal and psychosocial skills. (2007-03-01)

New research calls for rethink on approach to treating NTDs in urban areas
New research published today in The Lancet Infectious Diseases, suggests the effectiveness of large-scale distribution of medication (known as Mass Drug Administration or MDA) to treat lymphatic filariasis (LF) in urban areas needs to be re-examined. (2018-02-05)

Study finds that most older adults are aware of medication risks
Most older adults are aware of medication risks, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2017-09-18)

Controlling blood pressure even when older can prevent dementia in African Americans
Controlling blood pressure with any of the commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications (beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blocks, and diuretics) can prevent dementia in older African-Americans with hypertension according to a new study from Regenstrief Institute researchers. (2018-04-09)

Study estimates misuse of prescribed opioids in the United States
A new Pharmacoepidemiology & Drug Safety study estimates the prevalence and risk factors for self-reported misuse of prescribed opioids in the general adult population. (2019-02-06)

The danger of Z-drugs for dementia patients
Strong sleeping pills known as 'Z-drugs' are linked with an increased risk of falls, fractures and stroke among people with dementia, according to new research. Sleep disturbance is common among people with dementia and the impact for patients and their families is significant. To date there are no proven effective treatments available, however people with dementia are often prescribed Z-drugs (zopiclone, zaleplon, and zolpidem). The new study reveals that stronger doses of these drugs are linked with an increased risk of adverse effects. (2020-11-23)

Study shows improving pediatric asthma care is possible
New study findings published in the March issue of Hospital Pediatrics shows improved personalized inpatient assessments can enhance the accuracy of the prescribed asthma therapy a child receives. A physician's asking of the six key asthma control questions can help. (2018-03-02)

Emergency departments administering more medications through the nose
Administering medications through the nose as an alternative to injections or IVs is becoming increasingly popular in emergency departments and ambulances, according to a paper by Loyola Medicine pharmacists. The intranasal route 'is easy, fast and noninvasive,' emergency department pharmacist Megan A. Rech, Pharm.D., M.S., and colleagues write in the journal Annals of Emergency Medicine. (2017-04-18)

Is rushing your child to the ER the right response?
If a child gets a small burn, starts choking or swallows medication, parents may struggle to decide whether to provide first aid at home or rush them to the hospital, suggests a new national poll. (2017-10-16)

Be a control freak: Allergists outline new focus for asthmatics
A Mayo Clinic allergist and colleagues representing the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology and the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology announce they are revising the old classification of asthma patients by disease severity to determine treatment and moving to a new expectation for all asthma patients: excellent symptom control. (2005-10-24)

Atomic force imaging used to study nematodes
In a new study, researchers report for the first time the effective imaging of the nanoscale structure of C. elegans nematodes' cuticle using atomic force microscopy operating in PeakForce Tapping mode. (2017-02-17)

Teens dangerously uninformed about OTC medication
The majority of teens say they have never heard of acetaminophen -- or what the appropriate dosing of it is even with access to the label instructions -- despite having taken the medication recently, according to a new University of Rochester Medical Center Study assessing teens' health literacy. (2010-05-01)

New oral anticoagulant drugs associated with lower kidney risks
Mayo Clinic researchers have shown a link between which type of oral anticoagulant (blood-thinning medication) a patient takes to prevent a stroke and increased risks of kidney function decline or failure. (2017-11-20)

URI drug study produces 'promising therapy' for alcohol abuse
A University of Rhode Island College of Pharmacy professor is working to change that, and a new clinical trial is right around the corner. Fatemeh Akhlaghi, the Ernest Mario Distinguished Chair in Pharmaceutics, is part of a team working to develop a novel medication to treat alcohol use disorder, the term scientists and health practitioners use. (2018-06-28)

Depressed people have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation
Depressed people have an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, according to a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a European Society of Cardiology (ESC) journal.1 Medication was not responsible for the high frequency of atrial fibrillation in depressed people. The findings are reported during Global AF Aware Week. (2018-11-20)

Certain antidepressants more effective in treating youth anxiety disorder, analysis shows
A meta-analysis study by University of Cincinnati researchers shows for the first time that SSRIs may be the more effective antidepressant treatment for youth anxiety disorder. (2018-03-19)

Eliminating cost barriers helps heart patients comply with drug regimens
Doctors often cite the high price of a prescription drug as a reason they don't prescribe it, while patients similarly say that cost is a main reason they quit taking a drug. Removing this financial barrier might increase the use of evidence-based therapies, improve patient adherence to those medications, and potentially save lives. (2018-03-11)

Renal insufficiency: Frequently undetected
In Germany, nearly 2 million people have non-dialysis-dependent renal insufficiency. This is the result presented by Matthias Girndt and colleagues, based on a study from the Robert Koch Institute and published in Deutsches Ärzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2016; 113: 85-91). In a second paper, Falk Hoffmann and colleagues conclude that one in five nursing home residents with renal insufficiency receives a contraindicated medication (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2016; 113: 92-98). (2016-02-29)

New hope for waitlisted patients addicted to opioids
As the opioid crisis continues to escalate, the number of people who need treatment for their dependency on heroin or prescription pain killers far exceeds the capacity of available treatment programs. People seeking treatment can wait months or even years for spots in clinics or with certified doctors -- and while they wait, they risk becoming infected with HIV or hepatitis, as well as dying from an overdose. (2017-12-06)

Endurance training helpful in recovery from muscle inflammation, new study shows
Endurance training can actually be helpful in dealing with muscle inflammation, according to a new paper co-written by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. (2017-11-08)

Editorial: Stop allowing beliefs to get in the way of treating opioid use disorder
Patients face unnecessary barriers to evidence-based treatment from government regulations as well as providers' own beliefs that are not grounded in science, researchers from the Grayken Center for Addiction at Boston Medical Center (BMC) said in an Annals of Internal Medicine editorial. (2018-12-18)

Asthma medication may have psychiatric side effects
In a Pharmacology Research & Perspectives study, the asthma medication montelukast (trade name Singulair) was linked with neuropsychiatric reactions such as depression and aggression, with nightmares being especially frequent in children. (2017-09-18)

Tackling adherence to treatment on several fronts
Learning to become self-sufficient and responsible is part of life's journey through the teen and young adult years. However, for young kidney-graft patients, any mistake or failure in keeping to their strict immunosuppressive therapy can lead to tragic results on the viability of the graft. Transplant specialists and researchers from eight leading pediatric medical centres across Canada and the United States have united to help make a difference. (2018-03-27)

Booklet on childhood fever reduces antibiotic prescriptions if used
Antibiotic prescribing rates are not affected (to a statistically significant degree) when physicians have access to a parent-focused booklet on childhood fever but do decrease if the booklet is used. (2018-07-10)

Examining the management of diabetes in special populations
A special issue of Current Diabetes Review examining the management of diabetes in special populations: awareness of the needs of ethnic minorities, elderly patients, bariatric surgery patients, those with mental illness, and those being discharged from the hospital. (2017-09-29)

Deep learning predicts drug-drug and drug-food interactions
A Korean research team from KAIST developed a computational framework, DeepDDI, that accurately predicts and generates 86 types of drug-drug and drug-food interactions as outputs of human-readable sentences, which allows in-depth understanding of the drug-drug and drug-food interactions. (2018-04-18)

Painful intercourse in women improved with fibromyalgia drug
Women with chronic pain or discomfort around the vulva showed improved sexual function with an oral nerve pain medication used to treat pain caused by a previous herpes infection as well as fibromyalgia, according to a Rutgers study. (2019-01-02)

Self-medication misuse is high in the Middle East
A new review indicates that there is a massive problem of self-medication misuse in the Middle East. (2017-06-19)

Mesenchymal stem cell therapy: Holding promise for feline inflammatory diseases
Stem cell therapy is acknowledged as having great potential for the treatment of a variety of diseases in both people and animals. The use of bone marrow-derived stem cells is well established in the treatment of human cancer patients, and veterinary applications for bone marrow- and adipose-derived stem cells are being evaluated (2018-03-13)

U-M study highlights multiple factors of ADHD medication use
Youth who take Ritalin, Adderall or other stimulant medications for ADHD over an extended period of time early in life are no more at risk for substance abuse in later adolescence than teens without ADHD, according to a University of Michigan study. (2016-06-08)

Innovations in primary care: Behavioral approach to treating Opioid use disorder
Innovations in primary care: Behavioral approach to treating Opioid use disorder. (2018-01-09)

Smart pills dumb down medical care, experts warn
Enthusiasm for an emerging digital health tool, the smart pill, is on the rise but researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have published a paper in the American Journal of Bioethics that cautions health care providers and policymakers to slow down when it comes to allowing this technology in patient care settings. (2018-09-20)

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