Popular Medications News and Current Events

Popular Medications News and Current Events, Medications News Articles.
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Russian chemists developed a way to synthesize drugs from renewable precursors
The scientists of RUDN University together with their Russian colleagues have developed a new approach to the synthesis of benzofurans from cheap raw materials. Original furans can be produced from wastes of agriculture and wooworking industry, such as sawdust, cobs and other by-products of crop production. The results of the work were described in the article published in Tetrahedron. (2017-11-14)

Probiotics could help millions of patients suffering from bipolar disorder
About 3 million people in the US are diagnosed every year with bipolar disorder, a psychiatric condition characterized by dramatic shifts in mood from depression to mania. Currently, the standard treatment includes a combination of psychotherapy and prescription medications such as mood stabilizers and antipsychotics. (2018-12-13)

Time to reassess blood-pressure goals
High blood pressure or hypertension is a major health problem that affects more than 70 million people in the US, and over one billion worldwide. Despite being a critically important risk factor for heart and kidney disease, defining the 'optimal' blood pressure has been a challenge. (2015-11-09)

Asthma Controller Step Down Yardstick -- treatment guidance for when asthma improves
The focus for asthma treatment is often stepping up treatment, but clinicians need to know how to step down therapy when symptoms improve. (2019-01-25)

Study examines opioid use in patients with rheumatoid arthritis
A new analysis indicates that the use of opioid pain medications in older US rheumatoid arthritis patients peaked in 2010 and is now declining slightly. (2017-06-21)

Follow-up cholesterol testing reduces risk of reocurrence for heart attack and stroke patients
If you have a heart attack or stroke, it's important to get your 'bad' cholesterol measured by your doctor on a follow up visit. Researchers have found that one step is significantly associated with a reduced risk of suffering another serious cardiovascular episode. (2017-11-12)

Dangers of commonly prescribed painkillers highlighted in study
Commonly prescribed painkillers need to be given for shorter periods of time to reduce the risk of obesity and sleep deprivation, a new study has revealed. (2017-12-06)

Methadone may reduce need for opioids after surgery
Patients undergoing spinal fusion surgery who are treated with methadone during the procedure require significantly less intravenous and oral opioids to manage postoperative pain, reports a new study published in the May issue of Anesthesiology, the peer-reviewed medical journal of the American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA). (2017-04-24)

Researchers examine how opioids affect proteins in the brain other than opioid receptors
In a new study, researchers have characterized the effects of a series of opioids on proteins in the brain other than opioid receptors. (2017-12-06)

Are adolescents with mental health conditions more likely to receive opioids?
Adolescents with a wide range of preexisting mental health conditions and treatments were more likely to progress from an initial opioid prescription to long-term opioid therapy than adolescents without those conditions, although long-term opioid therapy was uncommon overall. (2018-03-12)

New Atopic Dermatitis Yardstick provides practical guidance and management insights
A newly published Atopic Dermatitis (AD) Yardstick from the American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology has practical recommendations for physicians about the treatment of AD. (2018-01-04)

Primary care doctors may be unsure when kids' bad moods are serious or not
Family medicine doctors and pediatricians are less confident than psychiatrists in their abilities to tell the difference between normal irritability and possibly bigger issues in children and adolescents, according to Penn State researchers. Primary care providers and pediatricians were also more likely to prescribe medications when they thought there was a problem, while psychiatrists were more likely to start with behavioral therapy. (2018-04-05)

Weight loss medicines underutilized by veterans
Despite the availability of new weight management medications and several clinical guidelines recommending their use as part of a comprehensive treatment plan for obesity, a new study has found that their use is extremely low (about one percent) among eligible Veterans. (2019-05-15)

Are women with epilepsy using effective contraception?
In the largest study of contraceptive practices of women with epilepsy, 30 percent did not use highly effective contraception despite being at higher risk of having children with fetal malformations due to the anti-epilepsy medications they take. (2016-02-16)

Fertility rates no different for women with epilepsy
'Myth-busting' study among women with no history of infertility finds that those with epilepsy are just as likely to become pregnant as those without. (2018-04-30)

Common painkillers lower levels of prostate cancer biomarker
Common painkillers like aspirin and ibuprofen appear to lower a man's PSA level, the blood biomarker widely used by physicians to help gauge whether a man is at risk of prostate cancer. But the authors of the study caution that men shouldn't take the painkillers in an effort to prevent prostate cancer just yet. (2008-09-08)

Lifestyle changes reduce the need for blood pressure medications
Men and women with high blood pressure reduced the need for antihypertensive medications by making lifestyle changes. A 16-week program, focused on the DASH diet, weight management and exercise, resulted in the most dramatic declines in blood pressure. (2018-09-08)

Beta blocker use identified as hospitalization risk factor in 'stiff heart' heart failure
A new study links the use of beta-blockers to heart failure hospitalizations among those with the common 'stiff heart' heart failure subtype. (2019-12-04)

Improved treatment for alcohol use disorders, chronic pain, mood disorders
A Purdue University team is making drug discoveries to support millions around the world dealing with alcohol use disorders, chronic pain and mood disorders. They discovered that two peptides -- which are naturally metabolic products of Rubisco, a large protein found in many plants like spinach -- may aid in the development of new medications. (2019-01-03)

Women's hormones play role in drug addiction, higher relapse rates
Female-specific interventions are needed, but in the meantime, treatment centers could use this study to educate women about their stronger mental connections to places and objects. (2019-02-08)

Examination of postincarceration fatal overdoses after addiction treatment medications in correctional system
There were fewer postincarceration deaths from overdose among recently released inmates after a program was started to provide medications for addiction treatment (including methadone, buprenorphine or naltrexone) in a state correctional system. (2018-02-14)

Children with medical emergencies during airline flights have limited aid
Children afflicted with medical emergencies during commercial airline trips tend to have common ailments such as vomiting, fever or allergic reactions -- events that should be easily treated, according to a study led by Duke Health researchers. But few airlines stock first-aid kits with pediatric versions of therapies that would help, including liquid forms of pain relievers or allergy medications. (2019-07-25)

Lack of communication puts older adults at risk of clashes between their medicines
Most older Americans take multiple medicines every day. But a new poll suggests they don't get -- or seek -- enough help to make sure those medicines actually mix safely. That lack of communication could be putting older adults at risk of health problems from interactions between their drugs, and between their prescription drugs and other substances such as over-the-counter medicines, supplements, food and alcohol. (2017-11-29)

UCLA-designed program helps former HIV-positive inmates maintain health after release from jail
Researchers have developed an experimental program to help HIV-positive people maintain their health care regimens after their release from jail. They found that the program was more effective in helping inmates stay on their medications, and in keeping the virus controlled, than the approach that is most commonly used today for former inmates. (2018-03-27)

New UC study may help guide treatment of pediatric anxiety
Researchers from the University of Cincinnati looked at common medications prescribed for children and adolescents with anxiety disorders, to determine the most effective and best-tolerated. This study revealed that selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) performed best overall. The results, available online in the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, include the largest amount of data to date for analyses of pediatric anxiety disorder treatments. (2019-02-01)

Could targeting oxtyocin help treat opioid addiction?
A new review of published research indicates that the oxytocin system -- a key player in social reward and stress regulation -- is profoundly affected by opioid use. Therefore, it may be an important target for developing medications to treat opioid addiction and to prevent relapse. (2017-04-05)

Study: More people rely on government catastrophic drug plans
Government spending for the catastrophic drug program in Ontario rose 700 per cent between 2000 and 2016, during which there was a three-fold increase in the use of this plan, a new study has found. (2018-03-26)

Violence declines with medication use in some with schizophrenia
Some schizophrenia patients become less prone to violence when taking medication, but those with a history of childhood conduct problems continue to pose a higher risk even with treatment, according to a new study by researchers at Duke University Medical Center. (2008-07-01)

Health insurance changes, access to care by patients' mental health status
A research letter published by JAMA Psychiatry examined access to care before the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) and after the ACA for patients grouped by mental health status using a scale to assess mental illness in epidemiologic studies. (2017-09-06)

New HIV guideline outlines cost-effective prevention strategies for high-risk people
A new Canadian guideline outlines how new biomedical strategies to prevent HIV infection can best be used in high-risk populations both before and after exposure to the virus. The guideline, published in CMAJ, applies to adults at risk of HIV infection through sexual activity or injection drug use. (2017-11-27)

Exercise can tackle symptoms of schizophrenia
Aerobic exercise can significantly help people coping with the long-term mental health condition schizophrenia, according to a new study from University of Manchester researchers. (2016-08-12)

Pregnancy disorders may lead to more hot flashes
What occurs during pregnancy could have longer-term health effects than originally thought. A new study suggests that women with a history of hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes may experience a greater burden of hot flashes during the menopause transition. Study results will be presented during The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) Annual Meeting in San Diego, Oct. 3-6, 2018. (2018-10-03)

Use of non-vitamin K blood-thinners with certain medications associated with increased risk of major bleeding
Among patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation, concurrent use of certain commonly prescribed medications with non-vitamin K oral anticoagulants was associated with an increased risk of major bleeding, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-10-03)

Haphazard cholesterol checks put Australians at risk of heart disease
Nearly half of the Australians on stable lipid-lowering treatment may be having fewer than the recommended number of high-density lipoprotein (HDL-C) tests, while nearly one fifth are having more tests than is recommended, new research reveals. The study, published in today's BMJ Open, suggests many Australians may be at risk of developing cardiovascular disease because health checks are not being administered according to national guidelines. (2018-03-08)

Sex, drugs, and heart failure
Heart failure is almost as common in women as men, but its characteristics vary by sex. A new review summarizes the current state of sex-sensitive issues related to heart failure drugs included in treatment guidelines, and suggests future directions for improved care. (2018-06-22)

Statins may be associated with reduced mortality in 4 common cancers
A diagnosis of high cholesterol is associated with reduced mortality and improved survival in the four most common cancers, according to research presented today at Frontiers in CardioVascular Biology 2016. The 14-year study from nearly one million patients found that a high cholesterol diagnosis was associated with lower risk of death in lung, breast, prostate and bowel cancers. (2016-07-08)

Psychiatric diagnoses and medication use in children insured by Medicaid
Young children insured by Medicaid with a psychiatric diagnosis had early and prolonged exposure to psychotropic medications. (2018-04-30)

New details in schizophrenia treatment trial emerge
Two new studies from the CATIE trial provide more insights into comparing treatment options, and to what extent antipsychotic medications help people with schizophrenia learn social, interpersonal and psychosocial skills. Quetiapine, and to some extent olanzapine, may be more effective than risperidone among patients who were originally taking, but had to discontinue, perphenazine -- an older, first generation antipsychotic medication. Patients taking antipsychotic medications, regardless of type, experience modest improvements in social, interpersonal and psychosocial skills. (2007-03-01)

Study finds that most older adults are aware of medication risks
Most older adults are aware of medication risks, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (2017-09-18)

Controlling blood pressure even when older can prevent dementia in African Americans
Controlling blood pressure with any of the commonly prescribed antihypertensive medications (beta blockers, ACE inhibitors, calcium channel blocks, and diuretics) can prevent dementia in older African-Americans with hypertension according to a new study from Regenstrief Institute researchers. (2018-04-09)

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