Popular Memories News and Current Events

Popular Memories News and Current Events, Memories News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Building stress-resistant memories
Though it's widely assumed that stress zaps a person's ability to recall memory, it doesn't have that effect when memory is tested immediately after a taxing event, and when subjects have engaged in a highly effective learning technique, a new study reports. (2016-11-24)

Researchers achieve multifunctional solid-state quantum memory
Research team from CAS Key Lab of Quantum Information developed multi-degree-of-freedom multiplexed solid-state quantum memory and demonstrate photon pulse operation functions with time and frequency degree-of-freedoms. (2018-08-24)

The human brain works backwards to retrieve memories
When we remember a past event, the human brain reconstructs that experience in reverse order, according to a new study at the University of Birmingham. (2019-01-14)

Researchers propose how REM and non-REM sleep may work together to help us solve problems
Sleep is known to be important for creative thinking, but exactly how it helps and what role each sleep stage -- REM and non-REM -- plays remains unclear. A team of researchers have now developed a hypothesis, outlined in an Opinion published May 15 in the journal Trends in Cognitive Sciences, to explain how the interleaving of REM and non-REM sleep might facilitate creative problem solving in different but complementary ways. (2018-05-15)

Memory ensembles
For over forty years, neuro-scientists have been interested in the biological mechanisms underlying the storage of the information that our brain records every day. Today, a team of the University of Geneva demonstrates how the brain regulates the size of the neuronal ensembles that reflect the memory trace to optimize performance. By targeting neurons in the hippocampus, the scientists show that it is possible to inhibit -- or on the contrary to resurface -- a memory. (2016-02-11)

What is your memory style?
Why is it that some people have richly detailed recollection of past experiences (episodic memory), while others tend to remember just the facts without details (semantic memory)? A research team from the Rotman Research Institute at Baycrest Health Sciences has shown for the first time that these different ways of experiencing the past are associated with distinct brain connectivity patterns that may be inherent to the individual and suggest a life-long 'memory trait'. (2015-12-10)

New UC Riverside research advances spintronics technology
Engineers at the University of California, Riverside, have reported advances in so-called 'spintronic' devices that will help lead to a new technology for computing and data storage. They have developed methods to detect signals from spintronic components made of low-cost metals and silicon, which overcomes a major barrier to wide application of spintronics. (2018-02-01)

Think you know how to improve your memory? Think again
Research from Katherine Duncan at the University of Toronto suggests we may have to rethink how we improve memory. She has found our brains have particular states known as formation and recall. Optimal formation is best achieved when accompanied by novelty whereas familiarity leads to a recall state, hindering the goal. Duncan hopes these findings will one day help us to improve our memories and possibly offer insight into why diseases involving memory loss happen. (2017-05-31)

Broken shuttle may interfere with learning in major brain disorders
A broken shuttle protein may hinder learning in people with intellectual disability, schizophrenia, or autism. (2018-06-22)

How the brain fights off fears that return to haunt us
Neuroscientists have discovered a group of neurons that are responsible when a frightening memory re-emerges unexpectedly, like Michael Myers in every 'Halloween' movie. The finding could lead to new recommendations about when and how often certain therapies are deployed for the treatment of anxiety, phobias and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (2019-04-01)

New quantum states for better quantum memories
How can quantum information be stored as long as possible? An important step forward in the development of quantum memories has been achieved by a research team of TU Wien. (2016-11-23)

Hunting for the brain's opioid addiction switch
New research by Steven Laviolette's research team at Western University is contributing to a better understanding of the ways opiate-class drugs modify brain circuits to drive the addiction cycle. The identification of these opiate-induced changes offers the best hope for developing more effective pharmacological targets and therapies to prevent or reverse the effect of opiate exposure and addiction. These results were presented at the 10th Annual Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, May 31, 2016, in Toronto, Canada. (2016-05-31)

'Speed of thought' guides brain's memory consolidation
Memory consolidation, unconstrained by the interactions between the observer and the world, appears to move between the cortex and the hippocampus at speeds six or seven times faster than the actual events that created the memories. (2007-11-15)

New study finds reading can help with chronic pain
A study conducted by researchers from the University of Liverpool, The Reader and the Royal Liverpool University Hospitals Trust, and funded by the British Academy, has found that shared reading (SR) can be a useful therapy for chronic pain sufferers. (2017-03-01)

Haunted by the past
Good sleepers literally can settle cringe-worthy mistakes and embarrassing blunders in their head as neutralized memories, whereas people with insomnia were not able to do so. This breakthrough finding by the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, suggests that insomnia could primarily be caused by a failing neutralization of emotional distress. Which makes it understandable that insomnia is the primary risk factor for the development of disorders of mood, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress. (2019-04-25)

Memory function varies after damage to key area of the brain
Scientists at the University of Liverpool have discovered dramatic differences in the memory performance of patients with damage to the hippocampus, an area of the human brain key to memory. (2008-10-23)

Short-term stress can affect learning and memory
Short-term stress lasting as little as a few hours can impair brain-cell communication in areas associated with learning and memory, University of California, Irvine researchers have found. (2008-03-11)

People with depression have stronger emotional responses to negative memories
People with major depressive disorder (MDD) feel more negative emotion when remembering painful experiences than people without the disorder, according to a new study in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging. The study reports that people with MDD were able to control the negative emotions about as well as people unaffected by MDD, but used somewhat different brain circuits to do so. (2018-03-06)

University of Guelph researchers uncover why environmental cues make drug addiction extra hard to beat
Besides triggering the brain's emotional and stimulus-response systems, environmental cues activate areas where memories are processed, according to this University of Guelph study. Prompting these memory processing systems makes it extra difficult to counter addiction because the classic stimulus-response mechanisms are reinforced by the memory effects of environmental drug cues. While this double effect makes it hard to treat drug abuse, this finding may offer a way to use cues to improve cognitive behavioural therapy. (2019-02-27)

Detecting diminished dopamine-firing cells inside the brain could reveal earliest signs of Alzheimer
Detecting diminished dopamine-firing cells inside the brain could reveal earliest signs of Alzheimer's disease. Sheffield scientists discover a loss of cells that use dopamine may cause part of the brain -- responsible for forming new memories -- to function less effectively. Findings could revolutionise screening for Alzheimer's disease, which affects more than 520,000 people in the UK. (2018-03-27)

Watching a memory form
Neuroscientists at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science have discovered a novel mechanism for memory formation. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of the swim motor program of the sea slug Tritonia reveals that some neurons possess characteristics that predispose them to join neural networks in which learning is taking place. The findings represent a shift from the field's long-term focus on synaptic plasticity. (2015-11-05)

UCI cracks code to restoring memory creation in older or damaged brains
Aging or impaired brains can once again form lasting memories if an enzyme that applies the brakes too hard on a key gene is lifted, according to University of California, Irvine neurobiologists. (2018-02-16)

Mount Sinai study reveals how learning in the present shapes future learning
The prefrontal cortex shapes memory formation by modulating hippocampal encoding. (2017-04-06)

Using virtual reality to identify brain areas involved in memory
Virtual reality is helping neuroscientists at UC Davis get new insight into how different brain areas assemble memories in context. (2018-01-25)

A hormone that enhances one's memory of happy faces
A new study scheduled for publication in the Aug. 1 issue of Biological Psychiatry now shows that one way oxytocin promotes social affiliation in humans is by enhancing the encoding of positive social memories. (2008-07-28)

Researchers develop data bus for quantum computer
The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications. (2017-11-06)

Volcanic eruption influenced Iceland's conversion to Christianity
Memories of the largest lava flood in the history of Iceland, recorded in an apocalyptic medieval poem, were used to drive the island's conversion to Christianity, new research suggests. (2018-03-18)

Meet your new electronic trauma intervention
The popular building-block computer game Tetris might be more than an idle pastime that keeps you glued to a screen. Playing it shortly after experiencing a traumatic event seems to block some of the recurrent intrusive memories that people are often left with. The proof-of-concept of the role, which Tetris could play within psychological interventions after trauma, is described in Springer Nature's journal Molecular Psychiatry, in a joint study by Lalitha Iyadurai and Emily Holmes. (2017-03-28)

Daily photography improves wellbeing
Taking a photo each day and posting it online has complex benefits say researchers who say it supports improved wellbeing. A study recorded what photos people took, what text they added and how they interacted with others on the photo-a-day site for two months. (2018-04-30)

Ants find their way even while traveling backward
Some of us struggle to find our way back home while walking from an unfamiliar location in the usual, forward direction. Now imagine if you had to stay on the right path while walking backward or even spinning around and around. Now researchers reporting in Current Biology on Jan. 19 have found that ants can do exactly that. They also have new insight into the mental gymnastics required. (2017-01-19)

What are memories made of?
CU Boulder researchers have identified the distinct roles and locations in the brain of a protein called AKT believed to be instrumental in memory formation and synaptic plasticity. (2018-01-26)

Studying sleep's profound and extensive effects on brain function
Although the general benefits of a good night's sleep are well established, one-third of American adults do not get a sufficient amount of sleep. Recent research sheds new light on the extensive effects of sleep on the brain, as well as the harms caused by sleep loss. The studies were presented at Neuroscience 2017, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2017-11-12)

Potential new treatment for drug addiction relapse revealed
Research published in Addiction Biology by scientists at the University of Bath reveals a new potential mechanism for combatting drug addiction relapse. (2018-06-12)

Trauma and dementia patients given hope by 'flashbulb memory' breakthrough
University of Sussex scientists have made a telling breakthrough in detailing the formation of 'flashbulb memories', which can help a snail find a sugary treat but also mean a war survivor repeatedly relives their trauma. (2018-03-09)

Memory is greater threat to romantic relationships than Facebook
A new study was designed to test whether contacts in a person's Facebook friends list who are romantically desirable are more or less of a threat to an existing relationship than are potential partners a person can recall from memory. threatened current committed relationships, as reported in an article published in Cyberpsychology, Behavior, and Social Networking. (2015-09-30)

Virtual brain gives insights into memory deficits in depression
During a depressive episode the ability of the brain to form new brain cells is reduced. Scientists of the Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum examined how this affects the memory with a computational model. It was previously known that people in an acute depressive episode were less likely to remember current events. The computational model however suggests that older memories were affected as well. How long the memory deficits reach back depends on how long the depressive episode lasts. (2018-06-08)

The brain's auto-complete function
When looking at a picture of a sunny day at the beach, we can almost smell the scent of sun screen. Our brain often completes memories and automatically brings back to mind the different elements of the original experience. A new collaborative study between the Universities of Birmingham and Bonn now reveals the underlying mechanisms of this auto-complete function. It is now published in the journal Nature Communications. (2019-04-03)

Loss of brain synchrony may explain working memory limits, says study
A new study from City, University of London and MIT may have revealed the reasons behind our memory limitations. The researchers found that trying to retain too much information in our working memory leads to a communication breakdown between parts of the brain responsible for maintaining it. (2018-04-26)

Making new memories is a balancing act
Salk scientists discover that brain storage capacity is dynamic and varies by region. (2018-03-14)

Cell-type specific mechanism for formation and retrieval of cocaine-associated memories
A Japan-based research team led by Kanazawa University has revealed neuronal mechanisms underlying the formation and retrieval of cocaine use-associated memories. Their research sheds light on how drug addiction develops and reveals pathways that can be exploited for the development of strategies to treat cocaine addiction. (2019-04-15)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.