Popular Methamphetamine News and Current Events | Page 2

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West Virginia study details promising method for estimating rural intravenous drug use
A study published today in the American Journal of Public Health estimates that 1,857 people injected drugs in the last six months in Cabell County, W.Va., a rural county with a population of 94,958. This estimate is based on an innovative survey technique that public health officials can now use in their own rural communities to address the opioid epidemic. (2019-01-24)

Illicit drug use could be higher than previously thought; soars during special events
America's drug problem may be even worse than officials realize. And illicit drugs are consumed at a higher rate during celebratory events. Those are just two of the conclusions scientists have drawn from recent studies of drug residues in sewage. The researchers will present their results today at the 256th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2018-08-20)

Stopping meth helps reverse drug-induced heart failure
Heart failure caused by methamphetamine use is a growing public health issue. People experiencing heart failure caused by meth use can improve as much as people who never used meth if they get proper medical treatment and stop using the drug, according to new research. (2019-11-11)

Ecstasy ingredient may promote cooperation
The recreational drug known as ecstasy or molly may help people regain trust in others after being betrayed, suggests results of a controlled laboratory study, published in JNeurosci, of healthy men given a pure form of the substance. The drug is currently being assessed for its potential as a supplemental treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder. (2018-11-19)

Ohio researchers, partners find meth, similar drug overdoses growing rapidly
The number of overdose deaths involving methamphetamines and amphetamines in the state of Ohio increased more than 5,000 percent over the course of eight years, according to data collected by the Ohio Alliance for Innovation in Population Health. (2018-11-06)

The science Of Breaking Bad: Would you know if meth was cooked inside your house?
Researchers analysed the contamination levels in household items from a home suspected to have previously been used for cooking methamphetamine, to determine whether surface wipe samples can adequately establish contamination and define the health risks. Results demonstrate methamphetamine has continued to mobilise after manufacture for a period exceeding five years when the property was under new ownership. (2019-10-08)

Local health investigation sheds light on gastroschisis birth defect
Results of an investigation conducted by University of Nevada, Reno researchers, public health officials and area physicians published this week in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, indicate that Washoe County experienced a cluster of a particular birth defect, gastroschisis, during the period April 2007-April 2008. Subsequent review of medical records since the study's conclusion indicates that while the rate is still elevated, the cluster appears to have subsided. (2009-11-06)

Methamphetamine use cost the US about $23 billion in 2005, RAND study estimates
The first-ever comprehensive national assessment of the economic burden of methamphetamine use in the United States finds the drug cost the United States $23.4 billion in 2005, including the burden of addiction, premature death, drug treatment and many other aspects of the drug. (2009-02-04)

Injection drug use: a new study shows a mixed Canadian portrait
In Canada, 171,900 people injected drugs in 2016, up from 130,000 in 2011. In a study published in the American Journal of Public Health, researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Centre (CRCHUM) estimated, using multiplier methods, the number of people who injected drugs in 11 of the 13 Canadian provinces (Nunavut and Northwest Territories not included) and reported a 30-per-cent increase in the period studied. (2019-11-14)

Team discovers possible 'universal strategy' to combat addiction
An international research team has discovered a signaling pathway in the brain involved in drug addiction, together with a method for blocking its action, that may point to a single treatment strategy for most addictions. (2006-02-13)

One hit of crystal meth causes birth defects: U of T study
A single prenatal dose of methamphetamine - commonly known as speed - may be enough to cause long-term neurodevelopmental problems in babies, say University of Toronto researchers. (2005-07-26)

Boosting amino acid derivative may be a treatment for schizophrenia
Many psychiatric drugs act on the receptors or transporters of certain neurotransmitters in the brain. However, there is a great need for alternatives, and research is looking at other targets along the brain's metabolic pathways. Lack of glycine betaine contributes to brain pathology in schizophrenia, and new research from the RIKEN Center for Brain Science (CBS) shows that betaine supplementation can counteract psychiatric symptoms in mice. (2019-06-26)

Successful lab tests on a potential vaccine for heroin addiction
Scientists are reporting development and successful initial laboratory tests on the key ingredient for a much-needed vaccine to help individuals addicted to heroin abstain from the illicit drug. Their study appears in ACS' Journal of Medicinal Chemistry. (2011-07-20)

Oxytocin reduces cravings for methamphetamine
Many people have suggested that addiction hijacks the body's natural drives in the service of compulsive drug use. A new study now suggests that hijacking another natural system in the brain may help overcome drug addiction. Published in Biological Psychiatry, the study shows that administration of oxytocin -- a naturally occurring molecule well known for its role in social bonding and childbirth -- reduces drug-seeking behavior in methamphetamine-addicted rats. (2017-05-31)

University of Kentucky research sheds light on pain pill abuse
A study by a team of University of Kentucky researchers has shed new light on the potential habit-forming properties of the popular pain medication tramadol, in research funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse. The paper is slated to appear in an upcoming edition of the academic journal Psychopharmacology. (2012-09-26)

New vaccine could someday fight the effects of opioid combinations
Substance abuse is a continuing problem in the US, to the point of being an 'epidemic.' Treatments exist, but far too often patients relapse with devastating impacts on themselves and those around them. Now, scientists report that they have made progress toward a vaccine against the effects of fentanyl, a synthetic opioid, in combination with heroin. The researchers are presenting their research at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-21)

Addiction intervention in hospital is a 'reachable moment'
Patients who meet an addiction medicine consult team while they're in the hospital are twice as likely to participate in treatment for substance use disorder after they go home, according to new research. The study measures a key outcome for patients who participated in a first-of-its-kind addiction intervention program started by Oregon Health & Science University in 2015. (2019-08-15)

Look beyond opioids to solve national substance use epidemic, study suggests
A new study published reveals that three-quarters of participants in an inpatient addiction intervention program at Oregon Health & Science University came into the hospital using more than one substance. The findings suggests that a singular focus on opioids may do more harm than good if doctors overlook the complexity of each individual's actual substance use. (2020-08-28)

Drug overdose deaths in CT doubled in 6 years
Opioid overdose deaths in Connecticut doubled in the past 6 years, largely driven by use of multiple drugs together, according to a team of researchers from the University of Connecticut and Yale University. (2019-10-29)

'Ecstasy' shows promise for post-traumatic stress treatment
An international study involving researchers from UBC Okanagan has shown that MDMA, also known as ecstasy, may be a valuable tool for treating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Published recently in Psychopharmacology, the study demonstrated substantial improvements in individuals who had not responded to prior treatments, explains UBCO Associate Professor of psychology Zach Walsh. This is also, he adds, the most comprehensive evaluation of the safety and effectiveness of MDMA-assisted psychotherapy for PTSD. (2019-05-29)

College students with disabilities at greater risk for substance abuse
College students with physical and cognitive disabilities use illicit drugs more, and have a higher prevalence of drug use disorder, than their non-disabled peers, according to a Rutgers study. (2020-09-21)

Researchers identify gene possibly linked with methamphetamine addiction
A new study sheds light on the significance of a potential genetic risk factor for drug addiction and possibly other neuropsychiatric disorders. Both genetic and environmental factors are known to influence susceptibility to substance use disorders. However, the genetic basis of these disorders is largely unknown. (2015-12-10)

Methamphetamine withdrawal associated with brain changes seen in mood disorders
Results of a new study indicate that people who have recently stopped abusing the powerfully addictive drug methamphetamine may have brain abnormalities similar to those seen in people with mood disorders. The findings suggest practitioners could improve success rates for methamphetamine users receiving addiction treatment by also providing therapy for depression and anxiety in appropriate individuals. (2004-01-05)

How the brain helps us make good decisions -- and bad ones
A prevailing theory in neuroscience holds that people make decisions based on integrated global calculations that occur within the frontal cortex of the brain. However, Yale researchers have found that three distinct circuits connecting to different brain regions are involved in making good decisions, bad ones and determining which of those past choices to store in memory, they report June 25 in the journal Neuron. (2019-06-25)

Mapping international drug use by looking at wastewater
Wastewater-based epidemiology is a rapidly developing scientific discipline with the potential for monitoring close to real-time, population-level trends in illicit drug use. The results of the international monitoring campaigns performed annually over seven years (2011-2017) by an international group of scientists, the SCORE group (Sewage analysis CORe group Europe), are now compiled in an article published in the prestigious journal Addiction. (2019-10-23)

New study holds hope for improving outcomes for children exposed to methamphetamine
In a first of its kind study, researchers followed meth-exposed children to age 7.5 and found more supportive home environments could make a difference in their behavior and emotional control. (2016-01-21)

A rat's brain, on and off methamphetamine
Drug addiction is a vicious cycle of reward and withdrawal. Chronic users often relapse because of the unpleasant physical and psychological symptoms they experience when they stop taking the drug. Now, researchers report in the Journal of Proteome Research metabolic changes in the brains of rats during methamphetamine self-administration and withdrawal that could help identify biomarkers and treatments for addiction. (2019-10-16)

Prenatal meth exposure linked to abnormal brain development
A first of its kind study examining the effects of methamphetamine use during pregnancy has found the drug appears to cause abnormal brain development in children. The research is published in the April 15, 2009, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. Study author is Linda Chang, M.D., with the John A. Burns School of Medicine at the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu. (2009-04-15)

Primary care-based addiction treatment lowers substance dependence in people with HIV
A program developed at Boston Medical Center, which integrates addiction treatment into primary care for patients with or at risk for HIV, has been shown to lower patients' substance dependence and encourage their engagement in treatment. The findings are published online in the Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment. (2015-09-29)

Study explores link between methamphetamine use and risky sexual behavior
Recreational use of the illicit drug methamphetamine has long been associated with increases in overall impatient and risky behavior. Now, a new study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers affirms that meth use increases not only sexual desire but also, specifically and measurably, the risk of casual sex without a condom for those who have an increase in sexual desire. (2020-09-30)

Research lacking when it comes to heart disease in prison populations
A multi-institution team found multiple areas of research that can be explored in both the incarcerated and released population -- which number more than 13 million Americans -- to better understand and prevent cardiovascular disease. (2017-07-25)

New research backs Australian regulatory decision on poppers
Young gay and bisexual men are frequent users of alkyl nitrites, or poppers, but few show signs of addiction, risky consumption habits or other psychosocial problems, a study shows. (2019-06-20)

Stimulants may have detrimental effects on muscle control
Researchers have found that current or past use of methamphetamine or other stimulants may lead to psychomotor control deficits, or a reduced ability to control physical movement. (2017-04-20)

Study finds lobeline reduces self-administration of methamphetamine in rats
Lobeline, a drug with a long history of use in smoking cessation programs, may be a potential treatment for methamphetamine abuse. In a previous study using rats, researchers from the University of Kentucky found that lobeline decreased the animals' self-administration of d-methamphetamine (METH). They concluded that lobeline acted by decreasing the animal's perception of METH- induced pleasure (reward). (2003-05-02)

Experimental small molecule shows potential in preventing meth relapse
New research from The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) suggests that the reason methamphetamine users find it so hard to quit -- 88 percent of them relapse, even after rehab -- is that meth takes advantage of the brain's natural learning process. (2017-03-31)

Study examines opioid involvement in US drug overdoses
A recent analysis published in Addiction reveals how fatal overdoses involving stimulants (cocaine and other psychostimulants, primarily methamphetamine) have been increasing over the past few years. (2020-01-08)

Drinking, smoking, and drug use linked to premature heart disease in the young
Recreational drinking, smoking, and drug use is linked to premature heart disease in young people, particularly younger women, finds research published online in the journal Heart. (2021-02-15)

Treating wastewater with ozone could convert pharmaceuticals into toxic compounds
With water scarcity intensifying, wastewater treatment and reuse are gaining popularity. But some methods for killing microbes in wastewater create disinfection byproducts (DBPs) that could be harmful to human health. Now researchers have found that ozone treatment and subsequent chlorination can convert trace amounts of some pharmaceuticals in wastewater into DBPs called halonitromethanes. They report their results in Environmental Science & Technology. (2020-02-05)

Drug-use may hamper moral judgment
Regular cocaine and methamphetamine users can have difficulty choosing between right and wrong, perhaps because the specific parts of their brains used for moral processing and evaluating emotions are damaged by their prolonged drug habits. This is according to a study among prison inmates by Samantha Fede and Dr. Kent Kiehl's laboratory at the University of New Mexico and the nonprofit Mind Research Network. The findings are published in Springer's journal Psychopharmacology. (2016-07-13)

Methamphetamine and skin wounds: NYIT researcher wins NIH grant to study immune response
NYIT researcher Luis Martinez, Ph.D. has won a $431,700 National Institutes of Health grant to investigate, in mice, methamphetamine's effects on the underlying biological mechanisms that cause inflammation and impair wound healing. (2016-08-19)

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