Popular Microalgal Strain News and Current Events

Popular Microalgal Strain News and Current Events, Microalgal Strain News Articles.
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The math of malaria
A new mathematical model for malaria shows how competition between parasite strains within a human host reduces the odds of drug resistance developing in a high-transmission setting. But if a drug-resistant strain does become established, that same competition drives the spread of resistance faster, under strong selection from antimalarial drug use. (2018-08-28)

Spray coated tactile sensor on a 3D surface for robotic skin
A KAIST research team has reported a stretchable pressure insensitive strain sensor by using an all solution-based process. The solution-based process is easily scalable to accommodate for large areas and can be coated as a thin-film on 3-dimensional irregularly shaped objects via spray coating. (2018-09-20)

Dangerous wheat disease jumps Red Sea
A new form of stem rust, a virulent wheat disease, has jumped from eastern Africa and is now infecting wheat in Yemen in the Arabian Peninsula. (2007-01-16)

Women are naturally more fit than men
Women can process oxygen more quickly than men when they start to exercise, according to a new study from the University of Waterloo. (2017-12-04)

ID'ing features of flu virus genome may help target surveillance for pandemic flu
Researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified features of the influenza virus genome that affect how well the virus multiplies. These features are similar but not identical across viral strains. It's possible that the extent of similarity between strains influences whether two flu viruses can mix their genetic material to make a hybrid virus with the potential to explode into pandemic flu. (2018-01-31)

The bacterial 'Game of Thrones'
Much like animals and to a degree humans, bacteria enjoy a good fight. While their aggressive characteristics are broadly known, their approach to conflict is less understood. In research published in Current Biology, researchers at the University of Oxford have shed light on this area of bacterial behavior, revealing that they approach conflict in much the same way as a human platoon, responding to a threat with a coordinated, collective retaliation. (2018-01-25)

Are American Zika strains more virulent than Pacific and Asian strains?
Over recent years, Zika virus (ZIKV) has spread eastward from Africa and Asia, leading to an epidemic in the Americas. Now, researchers comparing American, Pacific and Southeast Asian subtypes of the virus in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have concluded that the American-subtype strain has the highest ability to grow both in vitro and in vivo. (2019-06-06)

Cells rank genes by importance to protect them, according to new research
Researchers at the University of Oxford have discovered that a cellular mechanism preferentially protects plant genes from the damaging effects of mutation. A new study, carried out in the Department of Plant Sciences, together with international colleagues, has shown for the first time that DNA Mismatch Repair (MMR), which corrects mutations that arise during the replication of the genome during cell division, is targeted to particular regions of the genome, and preferentially repairs genes. (2018-01-05)

Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of divisions of a cancer cell. This effect is reported in the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (2017-11-10)

Huntington's Disease Mouse Model To Be Distributed By Jackson Laboratory
The first strain of mouse genetically engineered to model major symptoms of Huntington's disease -- an inherited, degenerative brain disease that affects an estimated 30,000 Americans -- is now undergoing processing at The Jackson Laboratory for distribution to researchers worldwide (1997-04-02)

Yale researchers identify target for novel malaria vaccine
A Yale-led team of researchers have created a vaccine that protects against malaria infection in mouse models, paving the way for the development of a human vaccine that works by targeting the specific protein that parasites use to evade the immune system. The study was published by Nature Communications. (2018-07-13)

Obesity linked with higher chance of developing rapid, irregular heart rate
People with obesity are more likely to develop a rapid and irregular heart rate, called atrial fibrillation, which can lead to stroke, heart failure and other complications, according to Penn State researchers. They found that people with obesity had a 40 percent higher chance of developing atrial fibrillation than people without obesity. (2018-04-18)

Mere expectation of checking work email after hours harms health of workers and families
The study demonstrates that employees do not need to spend actual time on work in their off-hours to experience harmful effects. The mere expectations of availability increase strain for employees and their significant others -- even when employees do not engage in actual work during nonwork time. (2018-08-10)

Scientists have discovered a new type of Botox
A new source of the botulinum neurotoxin was discovered by Canadian and American scientists in a strain of animal gut bacteria known as Enterococcus faecium. The neurotoxic protein is known for its paradoxical ability to remove wrinkles yet cause botulism, a potentially fatal illness associated with food poisoning. (2018-01-26)

Scientists have a new way to gauge the growth of nanowires
In a new study, researchers from the US Department of Energy's Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories observed the formation of two kinds of defects in individual nanowires, which are smaller in diameter than a human hair. (2018-03-19)

Tiny probe could produce big improvements in batteries and fuel cells
The key to needed improvements in the quest for better batteries and fuels cells likely lies in the nanoscale, a realm so tiny that the movement of a few atoms or molecules can shift the landscape. A team of American and Chinese researchers has built a new window into this world to help scientists better understand how batteries really work. They describe their nanoscale probe in the Journal of Applied Physics. (2016-05-31)

H3N2 mutation in last year's flu vaccine responsible for lowered efficacy
The below average efficacy of last year's influenza vaccine (which was only 20 to 30 percent effective) can be attributed to a mutation in the H3N2 strain, a new study reports. With the mutation, most people receiving the egg-grown vaccine did not have immunity against H3N2 viruses that circulated last year. (2017-11-06)

A synthetic chameleon has been developed
An international team of researchers including Dmitry Ivanov, the head of laboratory of functional soft-matter systems, MSU, announced the development of a synthetic chameleon skin. Similar to its biological analogue, the synthetic skin reacts to mechanical stimuli by changing its stiffness and color. The scientists see their development as quite promising. The work was published in the recent issue of the Science journal. (2018-03-30)

Bionic bacteria may help fight disease and global warming
A strain of genetically enhanced bacteria developed by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies may pave the way for new synthetic drugs and new ways of manufacturing medicines and biofuels, according to a paper published September 18 in Nature Chemical Biology. (2011-09-21)

Caregivers face strain when patients receive heart pumps
When heart failure patients receive a heart pumping device known as a left ventricular assist device (LVAD), their caregivers seem to suffer, too -- at least initially, according to research in Journal of the American Heart Association (JAHA), the Open Access Journal of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. (2018-03-07)

Your best diet might depend on your genetics
If you've ever seen a friend have good results from a diet but then not been able to match those results yourself, you may not be surprised by new findings in mice that show that diet response is highly individualized. (2016-07-13)

Math shows how human behavior spreads infectious diseases
Mathematics can help public health workers better understand and influence human behaviors that lead to the spread of infectious disease, according to a study from the University of Waterloo. (2018-08-16)

Revolutionizing electronics using Kirigami
A research team in the Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and the Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute (EIIRIS) at Toyohashi University of Technology has developed an ultrastretchable bioprobe using a 'Kirigami' designs. The Kirigami-based bioprobe enables one to follow the shape of spherical and large deformable biological samples such as heart and brain tissues. In addition, its low strain-force characteristic reduces the force induced on organs, thereby enabling minimally invasive biological signal recording. (2017-12-08)

Frog slime kills flu virus
Frogs' skins were known to secrete peptides that defend them against bacteria. The finding suggests that the peptides represent a resource for antiviral drug discovery as well. (2017-04-18)

Variation between strains may account for differences in vulnerability to infection
New research shows that subtle differences between bacterial strains may cause dramatic differences in outcome between people infected with the same microbe. (2018-01-11)

Viral genome sequencing in the heart of a Lassa outbreak
The first researchers to deploy a mobile nanopore sequencing technology to evaluate viral genomics at the height of a Lassa virus outbreak in 2018 now report their results. (2019-01-03)

Swine flu monitoring needed for farm workers, study says
A University of Alberta study recommends that workers on pig farms be monitored as part of influenza pandemic preparedness. (2008-02-11)

New heart attack test better informs of underlying condition
A new blood test developed by a University of Alberta physician promises to eliminate the guesswork clinicians face with an apparent heart attack. (2018-03-15)

Investigators narrow in on a microRNA for treating multiple sclerosis
Investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital have discovered a microRNA -- a small RNA molecule -- that increases during peak disease in a mouse model of MS and in untreated MS patients. (2019-11-26)

A nanophenomenon that triggers the bone-repair process
Researchers at the Institut Català de Nanociència i Nanotecnologia have resolved one of the great unknowns in bone self-repair: how the cells responsible for forming new bone tissue are called into action. Their work reveals the role of an electromechanical phenomenon at the nanoscale, flexoelectricity, as a possible mechanism for stimulating the cell response and guiding it throughout the fracture repair process. (2018-01-19)

Piezomagnetic material changes magnetic properties when stretched
Piezoelectric materials, which generate an electric current when compressed or stretched, are familiar and widely used: lighters that spark when you press a switch, microphones, sensors, motors and all kinds of other devices. Now a group of physicists has found a material with a similar property, but for magnetism. This 'piezomagnetic' material changes its magnetic properties when put under mechanical strain. (2018-03-16)

Mystery of Yemen cholera epidemic solved
The most likely source of the cholera epidemic in Yemen has been discovered by scientists. Through the use of genomic sequencing, scientists estimate the strain of cholera causing the current outbreak in Yemen -- the worst cholera outbreak in recorded history -- came from Eastern Africa and entered Yemen with the migration of people in and out of the region. Genomics can enable researchers to estimate the risk of future cholera outbreaks and help better target interventions. (2019-01-02)

Foodborne pathogens hard to remove from produce, research is ongoing
Will you ever feel comfortable eating fresh spinach again? All raw agricultural products carry a minimal risk of contamination, said a University of Illinois scientist whose research focuses on keeping foodborne pathogens, including the strain of E. coli found recently on spinach, out of the food supply. (2006-10-02)

NIH scientists develop macaque model to study Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever
Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral disease spread by ticks in the Middle East, Asia, Africa and parts of Europe. Infection with CCHF virus is fatal in nearly one of every three cases. No specific treatments or vaccines for CCHF exist, primarily because a suitable animal model for studying the disease has not been available. Now, as reported in Nature Microbiology, researchers at NIAID have developed a new animal model to study the disease. (2018-04-09)

Probiotic may help treat colic in infants
Probiotics -- or 'good bacteria' -- have been used to treat infant colic with varying success. In a new trial published in the journal Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, investigators have shown that drops containing a particular probiotic strain (Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12) reduced the duration of daily crying by more than 50% in 80% of the 40 infants who received the probiotic once daily for 28 days, with beneficial effects on sleep duration and on stool frequency and consistency. (2019-12-04)

Fungal mating: Next weapon against corn aflatoxin?
Native fungi combinations show promise against aflatoxin. (2019-04-03)

Polymers that mimic chameleon skin
Biological tissues have complex mechanical properties -- soft-yet-strong, tough-yet-flexible -- that are difficult to reproduce using synthetic materials. An international team (CNRS, Université de Haute-Alsace, ESRF the European Synchrotron, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and University of Akron) has managed to produce a biocompatible synthetic material that replicates tissue mechanics and alters color when it changes shape, like chameleon skin. It promises new materials for biomedical devices. (2018-03-29)

Protecting rice crops at no extra cost
A newly identified genetic mechanism in rice can be utilized to maintain resistance to a devastating disease, without causing the typical tradeoff -- a decrease in grain yield, a new study reports. (2017-02-02)

Researchers find transferable antibiotic resistance gene in pathogen of developing nations
A team of investigators has found that the mcr-1 drug resistance gene, which encodes resistance to a drug that is used as a last resort, has been found for the first time in Shigella flexneri. Shigella are one of the leading causes of diarrhea worldwide. The research is published March 2 in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, a journal of the American Society for Microbiology. (2018-03-02)

Inflammation awakens sleepers
The inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse. This is because special viruses integrate their genome into Salmonella, which further strengthens the pathogen. (2017-03-29)

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