Popular Microorganisms News and Current Events

Popular Microorganisms News and Current Events, Microorganisms News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Balancing the gut
Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence 'Precision Medicine in Chronic Inflammation' in Kiel and Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have uncovered a critical mechanism that controls immune reactions against microorganisms in the intestine. The results of the international study may contribute to the development of new therapies for chronic inflammatory bowel disease. They have been published in the journal Nature Immunology. (2019-02-26)

Innate immune system worsens the situation in severe COVID-19
In patients with severe COVID-19, the innate immune system overreacts. This overreaction may underlie the formation of blood clots (thrombi) and deterioration in oxygen saturation that affect the patients. This is shown in an Uppsala University study published in the journal Frontiers in Immunology. (2021-02-23)

A new model for activation of the immune system
By studying a large protein (the C1 protein) with X-rays and electron microscopy, researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have established a new model for how an important part of the innate immune system is activated. The activation of the C1 protein is a fundamental mechanism in immunology, and therefore the new research results also have medical potential. (2017-01-23)

Healthy fat hidden in dirt may fend off anxiety disorders
Thirty years after scientists first suggested that increased exposure to microorganisms could benefit health, CU Boulder researchers have identified an anti-inflammatory fat in a soil-dwelling bacterium that may be partly responsible. Someday, they hope to use it to develop an immunization against stress-related disorders. (2019-05-29)

Small but versatile
The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms. Yet, we are still discovering which factors allow them to thrive in the ocean: A new publication reveals that marine Thaumarchaeota have a broader metabolism than previously thought. (2018-12-10)

A simple method developed for 3-D bio-fabrication based on bacterial cellulose
Bacterial cellulose can be used in food, cosmetics and biomedical applications, such as implants and artificial organs. (2018-03-26)

Plant perfumes woo beneficial bugs
Scientists funded by the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council have discovered that maize crops emit chemical signals which attract growth-promoting microbes to live amongst their roots. This is the first chemical signal that has been shown to attract beneficial bacteria to the maize root environment. (2012-04-24)

Your stomach bacteria determines which diet is best for weight reduction
New research enables 'tailored' diet advice -- based on our personal gut microbiome -- for persons who want to lose weight and reduce the risk of disease. Systems biologists at Chalmers University of Technology have for the first time successfully identified in detail how some of our most common intestinal bacteria interact during metabolism. (2015-09-10)

Unexpected environmental source of methane discovered
Roughly 10 percent of nitrogen-fixing microorganisms contain the genetic code for manufacturing a back-up enzyme, called iron iron-only nitrogenase, to do their job. New research reveals that this enzyme allows these microorganisms to convert nitrogen gas to ammonia and carbon dioxide into methane at the same time. This enzymatic pathway is a previously unknown route for the natural biological production of methane. (2018-01-15)

Tests with topical treatment strategy for fighting skin cancer yield positive results
The methodology developed in Brazil combines low-intensity electric current with a formulation containing nanoencapsulated chemotherapy. According to preliminary results of the study, cancer-induced mice treated with this new approach presented a significantly greater reduction in the size of the tumor than those that received it through injection. (2017-10-06)

Microbes can grow on nitric oxide
Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. A study by Boran Kartal from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany, and colleagues reveals that microorganisms can grow on NO. Their results, which are now published in Nature Communications, change our view of the earth's nitrogen cycle and how microorganisms regulate the release of greenhouse gases from natural and man-made environments. (2019-03-18)

Investigating cell stress for better health -- and better beer
Human beings are not the only ones who suffer from stress -- even microorganisms can be affected. Now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have devised a new method to study how single biological cells react to stressful situations. Understanding these responses could help develop more effective drugs for serious diseases. As well as that, the research could even help to brew better beer. (2019-02-12)

Climate change: Soil animals cannot explain self-reinforcing effect
Leipzig. When the soil warms up, it releases more carbon dioxide (CO2) -- an effect that further fuels climate change. Until now, it had been assumed that the reason for this was mainly due to the presence of small soil animals and microorganisms that would eat and breathe more in warmer temperatures. However, a new study in Nature Climate Change has shown that this is not the case. Quite the contrary: If warmth is accompanied by drought, the soil animals eat even less. (2017-12-21)

A gut feeling for mental health
The first population-level study on the link between gut bacteria and mental health identifies specific gut bacteria linked to depression and provides evidence that a wide range of gut bacteria can produce neuroactive compounds. Jeroen Raes (VIB-KU Leuven) and his team published these results today in the scientific journal Nature Microbiology. (2019-02-04)

Algae with light switch
The adhesion of Chlamydomonas, a unicellular alga, to surfaces is light-dependent. (2017-09-29)

Microbial ecosystem at Laguna La Brava may contain novel microorganisms
An investigation of the microbial environment at Laguna La Brava in Chile may suggest that novel microorganisms might be at work in the absence of cyanobacteria, according to a study published Nov. 15, 2017 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Maria Eugenia Farias from Laboratorio de Investigaciones Microbiológicas de Lagunas Andinas, Argentina, and colleagues. (2017-11-15)

Important to maintain a diversity of habitats in the sea
Researchers from University of Gothenburg and the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences (SLU) show that both species diversity and habitat diversity are critical to understand the functioning of ecosystems. (2017-02-14)

Monitoring the environment with artificial intelligence
Microorganisms perform key functions in ecosystems and their diversity reflects the health of their environment. Researchers from UNIGE use genomic tools to sequence the DNA of microorganisms in samples, and then exploit this considerable amount of data with artificial intelligence. They build predictive models capable of establishing a diagnosis of the health of ecosystems and identify species that perform important functions. This new approach will significantly increase the observation capacity of large ecosystems. (2018-12-13)

Fountain of youth for heart health may lie in the gut
As our collection of resident gut bacteria changes with age, it increasingly produces harmful metabolites that damage veins and blood vessels, driving disease, a new study suggests (2019-03-19)

Scientists' warning to humanity: Microbiology and climate change
When it comes to climate change, ignoring the role of microorganisms could have dire consequences, according to a new statement issued by an international team of microbiologists. (2019-07-08)

Next generation solvent contributes to next generation biofuel production from biomass
Compared to first-generation biofuels produced from foodstuffs, production of second-generation biofuels for daily use is an urgent issue. In this study, a novel carboxylate-type liquid zwitterion was developed as a solvent of biomass, which could dissolve cellulose with very low toxicity to microorganisms. Use of this novel solvent enables significant reduction of energy cost for ethanol production from non-food biomass. Thus, second-generation biofuel ethanol production is in sight of practical implementation. (2017-12-04)

The microbiome of a native plant is much more resilient than expected
The microbiome, which consists of all microorganisms that live on or in plants, animals and also humans, is important for the health and development of these organisms. In a new study published in eLife, scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, investigated how a plant responds to manipulations of its microbial associations. The results indicate that the enormous bacterial diversity residing in natural soils may account for the stability of the plant-microbiome relationship. (2018-04-17)

Hot springs microbes hold key to dating sedimentary rocks, researchers say
Scientists studying microbial communities and the growth of sedimentary rock at Mammoth Hot Springs in Yellowstone National Park have made a surprising discovery about the geological record of life and the environment. Their discovery could affect how certain sequences of sedimentary rock are dated, and how scientists might search for evidence of life on other planets. (2008-01-22)

Probiotics no help to young kids with stomach virus
A major US study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis found that a commonly used probiotic is not effective in improving symptoms of diarrhea and vomiting in young children with gastroenteritis. (2018-11-21)

Biorenewable, biodegradable plastic alternative synthesized by CSU chemists
Colorado State University polymer chemists have taken another step toward a future of high-performance, biorenewable, biodegradable plastics. Publishing in Nature Communications, the team led by Professor of Chemistry Eugene Chen describes chemical synthesis of a polymer called bacterial poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) ­- or P3HB. The compound shows early promise as a substitute for petroleum plastics in major industrial uses. (2018-06-22)

Life under the surface in live broadcast
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have invented new systems to study the life of microorganisms in the ground. Without any digging, the researchers are able use microchips to see and analyze an invisible world that is filled with more species than any other ecosystem. (2017-12-07)

Could eating garlic reduce aging-related memory problems?
Consuming garlic helps counteract age-related changes in gut bacteria associated with memory problems, according to a new study conducted with mice. The benefit comes from allyl sulfide, a compound in garlic known for its health benefits. (2019-04-08)

Colon cancer is caused by bacteria and cell stress
The team of Professor Dirk Haller at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) made an unexpected discovery while investigating the triggering factors of colon cancer: Cell stress in combination with an altered microbiota in the colon drives tumour growth. Previously, it was assumed that this combination only contributes to inflammatory intestinal diseases. (2018-09-18)

Biologists taught infusoria to fight poisons
A team of scientists from the Faculty of Biology of Lomonosov Moscow State University and Laboratory of Aerobic Metabolism in Microorganisms of Skryabin Institute of Biochemistry and Physiology of Microorganisms of the Russian Academy of Sciences found a new substance with anti-oxidant properties able protect living organisms from various toxic compounds. The results of the study were published in Preparative Biochemistry and Biotechnology magazine. (2017-11-29)

Lifestyle is a threat to gut bacteria: Ötzi proves it
The evolution of dietary and hygienic habits in Western countries is associated with a decrease in the bacteria that help in digestion. These very bacteria were also found in the Iceman, who lived 5300 years ago, and are still present in non-Westernized populations in various parts of the world. The depletion of the microbiome may be associated with the increased prevalence, in Western countries, of complex conditions like allergies, autoimmune and gastrointestinal diseases, obesity. (2019-10-18)

Inflammation awakens sleepers
The inflammatory response that is supposed to ward off pathogens that cause intestinal disease makes this even worse. This is because special viruses integrate their genome into Salmonella, which further strengthens the pathogen. (2017-03-29)

More efficient use of raw materials with the aid of 'molecular conveyor belts'
Biotechnologists at Goethe University Frankfurt have now succeeded in optimizing sugar utilization in baker's yeast. (2017-09-18)

Sustainable 'plastics' are on the horizon
A new Tel Aviv University study describes a process to make bioplastic polymers that don't require land or fresh water -- resources that are scarce in much of the world. The resulting material is biodegradable, produces zero toxic waste and recycles into organic waste. (2018-12-24)

Researchers look to nature to unearth the secrets of cyclic imine cleavage
University of Tsukuba researchers have shown that enzymes can degrade cyclic imines. By isolating an enzyme able to degrade harmaline -- a β-carboline alkaloid -- from a soil microorganism, they identified the enzyme as copper amine oxidase and suggested a two-step mechanism for the process. It is hoped that the general applicability of the mechanism that was demonstrated will make this fundamental finding useful for future drug discovery. (2019-03-07)

Gutters teem with inconspicuous life
Scientists have shown that Parisian street gutters are oases of microscopic life, home to microalgae, fungi, sponges, and mollusks. Grouped into communities, these microorganisms may help clean rainwater and urban waste by decomposing solid debris and pollutants. A deeper understanding of the role and composition of these communities could help elucidate the services rendered by gutter ecosystems. The researchers' findings are the first to reveal the unsuspected biodiversity of microscopic life in Paris city streets. (2017-10-13)

Life under extreme drought conditions
The core region of the Atacama Desert is one of the most arid places on earth. However, scientists have found microorganisms there. But it has remained unclear whether these environments support active microbial growth or whether the observed cells were introduced by wind transport and subsequently degraded. Detailed analyses show: Even in the most arid zones of the Atacama a microbial community exists which becomes metabolically active following episodic increase in moisture after rainfalls. (2018-02-26)

Key difference between humans and other mammals is skin deep, says study
While humans and other species share some of the same genetic information, new research found that humans are unique among mammals when it comes to the types and diversity of microorganisms on our skin. This difference could have implications for our health and immune systems. (2018-06-11)

4 cells turn seabed microbiology upside down
With DNA from just four cells, researchers reveal how some of the world's most abundant organisms play a key role in carbon cycling in the seabed. (2013-03-27)

Red tide fossils point to Jurassic sea flood
Dinosaur-age fossilised remains of tiny organisms normally found in the sea have been discovered in inland, arid Australia -- suggesting the area was, for a short time at least, inundated by sea water 40 million years before Australia's large inland sea existed. (2018-06-05)

Study underlines large variation in patient mortality associated with different bloodstream infections
New research presented at this year's European Congress of Clinical Microbiology & Infectious Diseases (ECCMID) in Amsterdam, Netherlands (April 13-16) shows the danger posed by bloodstream infections (BSIs), and the large variation in mortality rates associated with different infectious microorganisms. The study is by Liya Lomsadze and colleagues from Northwell Health, Great Neck, N.Y., United States. (2019-04-12)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.