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Popular Microorganisms News and Current Events, Microorganisms News Articles.
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Caltech geobiologists discover unique 'magnetic death star' fossil
An international team of scientists has discovered microscopic, magnetic fossils resembling spears and spindles, unlike anything previously seen, among sediment layers deposited during an ancient global-warming event along the Atlantic coastal plain of the United States. (2008-10-22)

Small but versatile: Key players in the marine nitrogen cycle can utilize cyanate and urea
The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms. Yet, we are still discovering which factors allow them to thrive in the ocean. A research team from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and the University of Vienna was now able to show that marine Thaumarchaeota have a broader metabolism than previously thought. The results are published in the journal Nature Microbiology. (2018-12-10)

Microorganisms reduce methane release from the ocean
Bacteria in the Pacific Ocean remove large amounts of the greenhouse gas methane. (2019-09-10)

Artificial enzymes convert solar energy into hydrogen gas
In a new scientific article, researchers at Uppsala University describe how, using a completely new method, they have synthesised an artificial enzyme that functions in the metabolism of living cells. These enzymes can utilize the cell's own energy, and thereby enable hydrogen gas to be produced from solar energy. (2018-10-04)

Sucking your baby's pacifier to clean it may prevent allergies
New research suggests a link between parental sucking on a pacifier and a lower allergic response among young children. (2018-11-16)

Sewage reveals levels of antimicrobial resistance worldwide
Sewage can reveal the occurrence of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria among healthy populations, an international study led by the Technical University of Denmark shows. (2019-03-08)

Breast milk & babies' saliva shape oral microbiome
Newborn breastfed babies' saliva combines with breastmilk to release antibacterial compounds that help to shape the bacterial communities (microbiota) in babies' mouths, biomedical scientists have found. (2018-11-08)

Lithuanian researchers: Wastewater treatment plants could generate electricity
Researchers of Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania are working on improving the efficiency of microbial fuel cells (MFC) by using modified graphite felt. Primary results show that the new MFC can generate 20 percent higher voltage than usual cells. (2018-02-12)

Studying rivers for clues to global carbon cycle
In the science world, media and our daily lives, the debate continues over how carbon in the atmosphere is affecting global climate change. In a study of how organic carbon is processed in rivers, a research team including an engineer, ecologists and microbiologists has determined that carbon processing in rivers is a bigger component of global carbon cycling than previously thought. The team lays out a framework for how scientists should go about assessing those processes. (2008-02-08)

Wild grape yeast could be more effective than pesticides in preventing grape molds
Researchers have identified a wild yeast that is more effective at preventing common grape molds than a pesticide, suggesting that it could be an eco-friendly alternative to chemical pesticides. The researchers discovered that wild grapes host a huge array of yeasts that can inhibit common grape molds, while they found a smaller number of effective yeasts on farmed grapes. (2017-11-03)

Many more bacteria have electrically conducting filaments
Microbiologists led by Derek Lovley at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, who is internationally known for having discovered electrically conducting microfilaments or 'nanowires' in the bacterium Geobacter, announce in a new paper this month that they have discovered the unexpected structures in many other species, greatly broadening the research field on electrically conducting filaments. (2017-12-08)

Thawing permafrost produces more methane than expected
In a seven-year laboratory study, Dr. Christian Knoblauch from Universität Hamburg's Center for Earth System Research and Sustainability (CEN) and an international team have shown, for the first time, that significantly more methane is produced by thawing permafrost than previously thought. The findings, published in Nature Climate Change, make it possible to better predict how much greenhouse gas could be released by the thawing of the Arctic permafrost. (2018-03-19)

Which genes are crucial for the energy metabolism of Archaea?
A research team led by Christa Schleper from the University of Vienna succeeded in isolating the first ammonia-oxidizing archaeon from soil: Nitrososphaera viennensis -- the 'spherical ammonia oxidizer from Vienna.' In the current issue of the renowned journal PNAS, the scientists present new results: they were able to detect all proteins that are active during ammonia oxidation -- another important piece of the puzzle for the elucidation of the energy metabolism of Archaea. (2016-11-14)

Tyrosinase inhibitors from terrestrial and marine resources
Tyrosinase is a multifunctional copper-containing enzyme widely distributed in microorganisms as well as plants and animals which has a primordial role in melanin biosynthesis thus impacting on skin color and pigmentation. (2016-02-18)

Antibiotics from the sea
The team led by Prof. Christian Jogler of Friedrich Schiller University, Jena, has succeeded in cultivating several dozen marine bacteria in the laboratory -- bacteria that had previously been paid little attention. The researchers then carried out a functional characterisation of the bacteria, thus enabling a systematic screening for active substances. Initial bioinformatic analyses and cell biological observations indicate potential for the production of new antibiotics. The research team reports on this work in the current issue of the journal Nature Microbiology. (2019-11-18)

Urban biodiversity to lower chronic disease
Replanting urban environments with native flora could be a cost effective way to improve public health because it will help 'rewild' the environmental and human microbiota, University of Adelaide researchers say. (2019-03-27)

African lake provides new clues about ancient marine life
New research shows there may have been more nitrogen in the ocean between one and two billion years ago than previously thought, allowing marine organisms to proliferate at a time when multi-cellularity and eukaryotic life first emerged. (2017-01-31)

Early life exposure to antibiotics is related to increased risk of allergies later in life
Research presented Sept. 6, 2016, at this year's European Respiratory Society International Congress in London, UK, shows that exposure to antibiotics early in life is related to increased risk of developing allergies later in life. The research is by Dr. Fariba Ahmadizar, Utrecht University, Netherlands and colleagues. (2016-09-05)

Report identifies characteristics of microorganisms most likely to cause a global pandemic
A potential global catastrophic risk-level pandemic pathogen will most likely have a respiratory mode of transmission; be contagious during the incubation period, prior to symptom development, or when infected individuals show only mild symptoms; and need specific host population factors (e.g., immunologically naïve persons) and additional intrinsic microbial pathogenicity characteristics (e.g., a low but significant case fatality rate) that together substantially increase disease spread and infection. RNA viruses are the biggest threat. (2018-05-29)

Using bacteria to create a water filter that kills bacteria
Engineers have created a bacteria-filtering membrane using graphene oxide and bacterial nanocellulose. It's highly efficient, long-lasting and environmentally friendly -- and could provide clean water for those in need. (2019-01-18)

University of Manchester technology set to lead fight against anti-microbial resistance
Professor Douglas Kell and colleagues have developed novel technology that identifies the most effective antibiotic to kill organisms in urinary tract infections. (2019-04-04)

Eco-friendly water treatment works best with experienced bacterial flora
Sustainable, biological filters called slow sand filters have been used to filter drinking water since the 1800s. They don't use any chemicals, create no waste and use very little energy. New research from Lund University in Sweden shows that not only are the older filters more efficient cleaners -- they could be making a comeback soon with the help of new technology. (2018-05-14)

'Magic pools' approach can hurry studies of novel bacteria
To characterize the genes of newly identified bacteria, microbiologists often introduce mutations within the bacteria using mobile DNA segments called transposons to study the impact of these mutations. (2018-01-16)

Excessive phosphate fertilizer use can reduce microbial functions critical to crop health
A team of scientists at Penn State University set out to determine if nutrient history changed the function of soil microorganisms. The answer seems to be yes, and that soil treated with high amounts of phosphate can result in poorer plant performance, but even more intriguing, it appears that the soil microorganisms from this conditioned soil can negatively impact plant yield. (2019-03-18)

A new way to do metabolic engineering
University of Illinois researchers have created a novel metabolic engineering method that combines transcriptional activation, transcriptional interference, and gene deletion, and executes them simultaneously, making the process faster and easier. (2017-11-28)

New technique for finding life on Mars
Miniaturized scientific instruments and new microbiology techniques successfully identified and characterized microorganisms living in Arctic permafrost -- one of the closest analogs to Mars on Earth. By avoiding delays that come with having to return samples to a laboratory for analysis, the methodology could also be used on Earth to detect and identify pathogens during epidemics in remote areas. (2018-01-18)

Microorganisms can escape from a dead end by swimming
Researchers have shown that microorganisms can ingeniously escape from a dead end by swimming.The results pave the way to understanding the spread of infectious diseases. (2018-03-22)

Research reveals zero proof probiotics can ease your anxiety
A study from the University of Kansas appearing Wednesday in PLOS ONE found evidence that probiotics can reduce anxiety in rodents, but not in humans. (2018-06-20)

A social bacterium with versatile habits
Related individuals of a soil bacterial species live in cooperative groups and exhibit astonishing genetic and behavioral diversity. ETH researchers recently published these findings in Science. (2019-03-22)

Unique oil-eating bacteria found in world's deepest ocean trench
Research that reveals what lies at the bottom of the deepest part of the ocean -- the Mariana Trench. Until now, scientists knew more about Mars than the deepest part of the ocean. But an expedition to collect samples of the microbial population at the deepest part of the Mariana Trench (some 11,000 meters down) has revealed a new 'oil-eating' bacteria. (2019-04-11)

NUS engineers pioneer greener and cheaper technique for biofuel production
A research team led by Associate Professor He Jianzhong from the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at NUS Faculty of Engineering has found that a natural bacterium isolated from mushroom crop residue can directly convert cellulose to biobutanol, a biofuel. (2018-04-05)

Algae and bacteria team up to increase hydrogen production
A University of Cordoba research group combined algae and bacteria in order to produce biohydrogen, fuel of the future (2019-09-16)

What's needed for the next WHO Biosafety Handbook
In this Policy Forum, Kazunobu Kojima et al. highlight key issues that should be addressed through the next revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) Laboratory Biosafety Manual (LBM). (2018-04-19)

Efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels from glucose
Researchers have presented a new strategy for efficiently producing fatty acids and biofuels that can transform glucose and oleaginous microorganisms into microbial diesel fuel, with one-step direct fermentative production. (2019-06-19)

RUDN University researcher found out what happens to organic matter on rice fields
A soil scientist from RUDN University has found out how plant root secretions affect microorganisms and biochemical processes in paddy soils (rice fields, for instance). Rice field soils play a very important role in the agriculture of Southeast Asia, since they cover > 160 Mio ha and are used to produce food for a quarter of world population. The results of the study were published in the European Journal of Soil Biology. (2017-10-31)

Viruses in the oceanic basement
A team of scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology (SOEST) showed for the first time that many novel viruses are present in the fluids circulating deep in the rocky crust of the seafloor known as the ocean basement. Their recently published study also provides evidence that the viruses are actively infecting the many unusual microorganisms that live in the basement. (2017-03-28)

Model of fecal transplantation predicts which bacteria will flourish
In a paper in Cell Host & Microbe, scientists provide a statistical model predicting which bacterial strains will engraft after a fecal transplant. It is the first predictive strategy for developing a synthetic probiotic. The researchers also found that recipients acquired new bacteria that were previously undetected in both the donor and the recipient, suggesting that the post-fecal transplant microbiome is a mixture of bacterial strains from the donor, recipient, and the environment. (2018-02-14)

The role of nanobacteria in the organic matter cycle in freshwater systems
A team of scientists including researchers from Baltic Federal University studied freshwater microorganisms that can pass through biological filters. These microorganisms are understudied but were believed to play an important role in the biosphere. However, experiments showed that they had only a minor impact on the cycle of dissolved organic matter. (2021-02-10)

Drought defence
Just as the microorganisms in our gut are increasingly recognized as important players in human health and behavior, new research from the University of Toronto Mississauga demonstrates that microorganisms are equally critical to the growth and health of plants. For example, plants that are able to recruit particular bacteria to their root microbiomes are much more drought resistant than their fellows, says UTM PhD candidate Connor Fitzpatrick. (2018-01-23)

Changing how we view chlorine in soil
Researchers at Linköping University have studied how combinations of different environmental factors affect the chlorination of organic matter in soils. The results show that the supply of fresh organic compounds, which promote the growth of the microorganisms, increases chlorination. The discovery could mean that chlorine in ecosystems has a different significance than previously believed. (2018-01-10)

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