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Popular Microorganisms News and Current Events, Microorganisms News Articles.
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Changing how we view chlorine in soil
Researchers at Linköping University have studied how combinations of different environmental factors affect the chlorination of organic matter in soils. The results show that the supply of fresh organic compounds, which promote the growth of the microorganisms, increases chlorination. The discovery could mean that chlorine in ecosystems has a different significance than previously believed. (2018-01-10)

Life, liberty -- and access to microbes?
Poverty increases the risk for numerous diseases by limiting people's access to healthy food, environments and stress-free conditions. In a new essay published Nov. 26 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Suzanne Ishaq and colleagues at the University of Oregon, argue that poverty also compromises health by creating unequal access to beneficial microorganisms. The essay is part of the 'Microbiomes Across Systems' special issue. (2019-11-26)

Oral bacteria may help forensic scientists estimate time since death
Accurately determining the time since death is an important aspect of forensic sciences and casework. (2017-08-01)

Researchers discover natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide
A team of UCLA engineers and scientists discovered a new and potentially highly effective type of weed killer. This finding could lead to the first new class of commercial herbicides in more than 30 years, an important outcome as weeds continue to develop resistance to current herbicide regimens. (2018-07-13)

Mass biofuel production without mass antibiotic use
Rather than applying mass amounts of antibiotics to vats of biofuel-producing microorganisms to keep control these cultures, researchers have developed a new technique using modified strains that outcompete other possible contaminating microbes. (2016-08-04)

Biochar provides high-definition electron pathways in soil
Cornell University scientists have discovered a new high-definition system that allows electrons to travel through soil farther and more efficiently than previously thought. (2017-04-03)

Researchers create first global atlas of the bacteria living in your dirt
What lives in your dirt? University of Colorado Boulder researchers are one step closer to finding out after compiling the first global atlas of soil bacterial communities and identifying a group of around 500 key species that are both common and abundant worldwide. (2018-01-18)

Microorganisms duke it out within algal blooms
A five-month survey finds that algal blooms encompass dozens of types of microorganisms fighting for supremacy, with the dominant species shifting on an almost daily basis. (2016-02-29)

Microbiome predicts blood infections in pediatric cancer patients
Patients who developed bloodstream infections had significantly reduced microbiome diversity than patients who remained free of infection. (2018-01-22)

Experts: Public Will Accept Irradiation In Wake Of Meat Recall
The Hudson Foods hamburger recall may be just what it takes to convince Americans that it's time to accept irradiation as another technique to safeguard their food supply, two Purdue experts say. Irradiation can destroy the microorganisms responsible for food-borne illnesses. (1997-08-29)

Pollution linked to antibiotic resistance
Antibiotic resistance is an increasing health problem, but new research suggests it is not only caused by the overuse of antibiotics. It's also caused by pollution. (2020-08-13)

All-in-one: New microbe degrades oil to gas
The tiny organisms cling to oil droplets and perform a great feat: As a single organism, they may produce methane from oil by a process called alkane disproportionation. Previously this was only known from symbioses between bacteria and archaea. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology have now found cells of this microbe called Methanoliparia in oil reservoirs worldwide. (2019-08-20)

Improved prediction of pesticide residues
The use of pesticides can lead to a build-up of toxic and ecologically harmful residues in the soil. Until recently, it was not possible to ascertain in detail to which pesticides this applies and to what extent. Now, researchers from the UFZ and the Technical University of Denmark, have developed a model which allows the formation of potentially toxic residues to be more accurately predicted. (2018-02-13)

In the ocean's twilight zone, tiny organisms may have giant effect on Earth's carbon cycle
In a new study that challenges scientists' presuppositions about the carbon cycle, researchers find that tiny organisms may be playing in outside role in the way carbon is circulated throughout the ocean. (2018-07-18)

Plant seed research provides basis for sustainable alternatives to chemical fertilizers
Scientists assessed the seed microbiomes of two successive plant generations for the first time and discovered that seeds are an important vector for transmission of beneficial endophytes across generations. (2019-03-25)

Turning algae into fuel
A team of University of Utah chemical engineers have developed a new kind of jet mixer for creating biomass from algae that extracts the lipids from the watery plants with much less energy than the older extraction method. This key discovery now puts this form of energy closer to becoming a viable, cost-effective alternative fuel. (2019-03-04)

Research shows how genetics can contribute for advances in 2G etanol production
The study focused three fungi species which produce enzymes with application in biomass degradation; scientists in Brazil reveal how these substances are regulated and how they can interact synergically. (2018-04-12)

Scientists create biodegradable, paper-based biobatteries
The batteries of the future may be made out of paper. Researchers at Binghamton University, State University at New York have created a biodegradable, paper-based battery that is more efficient than previously possible. (2018-08-08)

Historical climate important for soil responses to future climate change
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Amsterdam, examined how 18 years of drought affect the billions of vital bacteria that are hidden in the soil beneath our feet. The results show that this type of extreme weather determines how soils respond to future climate change. (2018-11-30)

Gender-specific differences in the salivary microbiome of caries-active children
At the 97th General Session & Exhibition of the International Association for Dental Research (IADR), held in conjunction with the 48th Annual Meeting of the American Association for Dental Research (AADR) and the 43rd Annual Meeting of the Canadian Association for Dental Research (CADR), Stephanie Ortiz, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, USA, gave a poster presentation on 'Gender-specific Differences in the Salivary Microbiome of Caries-active Children.' (2019-06-21)

Pausing evolution makes bioproduction of chemicals affordable and efficient
Circumventing evolution in cell factories can pave the way for commercializing new biobased chemicals to large-scale. (2018-02-19)

Life from Earth could temporarily survive on Mars
German Aerospace Center scientists. The researchers launched these small lifeforms into Earth's stratosphere, which replicates key characteristics of the Martian environment, and found that some microorganisms, in particular spores of black mold, survived the trip. This new way of testing endurance to space travel will be invaluable for understanding the threats and opportunities of microbes in future missions to Mars. (2021-02-22)

Fluorine-containing molecules from cell cultures
Natural organic compounds that contain fluorine are rare because living organisms -- with a few exceptions -- do not produce them. American scientists have now genetically engineered a microbial host for organofluorine metabolism, allowing it to produce a fluoridated intermediate known as a diketide. As reported in the journal Angewandte Chemie, the diketide could then be used as a monomer for the in vivo production of fluorinated bioplastics. (2017-09-28)

Vampire bats' bloody teamwork
Vampire bats are the only mammals that feed exclusively on blood. The way they manage to do that offers us some remarkable insights into hologentics and evolution. (2018-04-10)

Immunity could be key to addressing coral crisis
Coral reefs support a quarter of all marine life, feed hundreds of millions of people and contribute vastly to the global economy. (2018-07-09)

Microbial signal recognition stems from existing building blocks
Freiburg biochemists show how evolution combines a nutrient sensor from existing elements. (2018-01-23)

Less flocking behavior among microorganisms reduces the risk of being eaten
When algae and bacteria with different swimming gaits gather in large groups, their flocking behaviour diminishes, something that may reduce the risk of falling victim to aquatic predators. This finding is presented in an international study led from Lund University in Sweden. (2020-08-24)

Discoveries reshape understanding of gut microbiome
The findings redefine how the so-called gut microbiome operates and how our bodies coexist with some of the 100 trillion bacteria that make it up. The discoveries could lead to new therapies for inflammatory bowel disease and people who've had portions of their bowels removed due to conditions like colon cancer and ulcerative colitis. They also help explain why the use of antibiotics can create a multitude of problems in the digestive system. (2020-10-22)

Microbes on explanted pedicle screws: Possible cause of spinal implant failure
In this paper, the authors demonstrate a significant association between pedicle screw loosening and the presence of low-virulent pathogens on spinal implants. (2019-05-28)

Plants love microbes -- and so do farmers
The Australian Sunshine Coast's plant diversity has helped University of Queensland researchers confirm that nurture has the upper hand -- at least when it comes to plant microbes. Australian Centre for Ecogenomics director Professor Phil Hugenholtz said a study of microbial communities necessary for plant development, led by UQ's Yun Kit Yeoh, could improve crop and plant yields. (2017-08-10)

How a bacterium can live on methanol
ETH Zurich researchers have identified all the genes required by a bacterium to use methanol as a food source. The results will help scientists advance the use of this resource in the field of biotechnology. (2017-08-22)

Reining in soil's nitrogen chemistry
The compound urea is currently the most popular nitrogen soil fertilizer. It's a way to get plants the nitrogen they need to grow. There's just one problem with urease: it works too well! New research suggests farmers may have a choice in how they slow the release of nitrogen, depending on their soil's acidity. (2018-07-11)

Microscopic technique for detecting microbial life in enceladus water plumes
A new study has demonstrated the potential to use digital holographic microscopy (DHM) to detect microorganisms and evidence of life in water collected from the plume rising from the surface of Saturn's icy moon Enceladus. (2017-09-18)

How live vaccines enhance the body's immune response
Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin's university hospital, have discovered a new mechanism by which live vaccines induce immunity. Molecules produced exclusively by live microorganisms are recognized by specialized receptors of the immune system, subsequently triggering a protective immune response. The new findings may help improve the safety and efficacy of vaccines. Results from this study have been published in the journal Nature Immunology*. (2018-04-04)

JCU scientist finds alcohol-free solution works
A James Cook University scientist has made a discovery that will make life easier for surgery patients and their surgeon. (2017-08-08)

Method speeds up time to analyze complex microscopic images
Researchers who typically required a week of effort to dissect cryo-electron tomography images of the 3-D structure of a single cell will now be able to do it in about an hour thanks to a new automated method developed by a team of scientists at Baylor College of Medicine and the National University of Singapore. (2017-08-31)

New study 'sheds light' on sun's role in mitigating fungal disease of mango fruit
The occurrence of stem end rot (SER) during storage means major losses for mango fruit growers and suppliers. In a recent Phytobiomes journal article, Diskin and colleagues show promising new research that explores sunlight's role in cultivating a beneficial mix of microorganisms that help mitigate SER. The research, discussed through their article titled, 'Microbiome Alterations Are Correlated with Occurrence of Postharvest Stem-End Rot in Mango Fruit,' offers a detailed account of their study. (2017-11-14)

Key enzyme for production of second-generation ethanol discovered in Brazilian Amazon
Protein encoded by gene found in microorganisms living in Amazon lake could boost efficiency on the sugarcane bagasse saccharification process, which makes for up to 50% of the global costs of cellulosic ethanol production. (2018-05-15)

Fatal horizon, driven by acidification, closes in on marine organisms in Southern Ocean
Marine microorganisms in the Southern Ocean may find themselves in a deadly vise grip by century's end as ocean acidification creates a shallower horizon for life. (2019-03-11)

Microorganisms in the subsurface seabed on evolutionary standby
Through genetic mutations microorganisms normally have the ability to develop new properties over a short time scale. Researchers now show that microbes in the deep seabed grow in slow motion with generation times of up to 100 years. (2017-03-20)

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