Popular Microscopy Techniques News and Current Events

Popular Microscopy Techniques News and Current Events, Microscopy Techniques News Articles.
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Science reveals improvements in Roman building techniques
In research published in EPJ Plus, researchers have carried out scientific analysis of the materials used to build the Atrium Vestae in Rome. They found that successive phases of modification to the building saw improvements, including higher quality raw materials, higher brick firing temperatures, and better ratios between carbonate and silicate building materials. (2019-10-25)

New treatment options for type 2 diabetes
Researchers believe they now have a considerable amount of evidence, much of it new, that in contrast to the current strategies for attacking type 2 diabetes, the recognition that it involves dormant microbes, chronic inflammatory processes and coagulopathies, offer new opportunities for treatment. (2017-08-29)

The 10-foot-tall microscopes helping combat world's worst diseases
The century-old mission to understand how the proteins responsible for amyloid-based diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntingdon's and Parkinson's work has taken major steps forward in the last 12 months, thanks to a revolution in a powerful microscopy technique used by scientists. (2018-10-30)

CNIC scientists develop new methods for analyzing gene function
Scientists at the CNIC have developed new methods to produce and analyze genetic mosaics. In these mosaics, tissues contain various groups of cells with different known genotypes, permitting study of the differences that these genotypes generate in cell behavior. (2017-08-10)

New technique reveals 3-D shape of nanostructure's polariton interaction
Researchers from Lehigh University have found a way to reveal the 3-D shape of the polariton interaction around a nanostructure. Their technique improves upon the common spectroscopic imaging technique known as scattering-type scanning near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM). The research will be online published today in Nature Communications. (2018-05-21)

Measuring the effects of drugs on cancer cells
A new approach established at the University of Zurich sheds light on the effects of anti-cancer drugs and the defense mechanisms of cancer cells. The method makes it possible to quickly test various drugs and treatment combinations at the cellular level. (2018-07-11)

Unveiling the mechanism protecting replicated DNA from degradation
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University and the FIRC Institute of Molecular Oncology (IFOM) in Italy have succeeded in depleting AND-1, a key protein for DNA replication, by using a recently developed conditional protein degradation system. Consequently, they were able to gain unprecedented access to the mechanism behind how AND-1 works during DNA replication and cell proliferation in vertebrate cells, demonstrating that AND-1 has two different functions during DNA replication mediated by different domains of AND-1. (2018-09-29)

Zooming into cilia sheds light into blinding diseases
A new study reveals an unprecedented close-up view of cilia linked to blindness. (2019-11-05)

Nature's smallest rainbows, created by peacock spiders, may inspire new optical technology
The mechanism behind these tiny rainbows may inspire new color technology, but wouldn't have been discovered without research combining basic natural history with physics and engineering. These super iridescent spider scales can be used to overcome current limitations in spectral manipulation, and to reduce the size of optical spectrometers for applications where fine-scale spectral resolution is required in a very small package, notably instruments on space missions, or wearable chemical detection systems. (2018-01-02)

NUS scientists develop novel chip for fast and accurate disease detection at low cost
A novel invention by a team of researchers from the National University of Singapore holds promise for a faster and cheaper way to diagnose diseases with high accuracy. Professor Zhang Yong from the Department of Biomedical Engineering at the NUS Faculty of Engineering and his team have developed a tiny microfluidic chip that could effectively detect minute amounts of biomolecules without the need for complex lab equipment. (2018-03-29)

Understanding your bacteria
New insight into bacterial cell division could lead to advancements in the fight against harmful bacteria. (2016-05-25)

Artificial wings reach new limits, thanks to inspiration from earwigs
Inspired by the wings of earwigs, scientists have designed artificial wings that exhibit extraordinary folding abilities. Whereas traditional origami folding techniques are limited by rigidity and number of folding patterns, the technique developed by Jakob A. Faber and colleagues overcomes these challenges. (2018-03-22)

Research reveals how estrogen regulates gene expression
The sequential recruitment of coactivators to the estrogen receptor complex results in dynamic specific structural and functional changes that are necessary for effective regulation of gene expression. (2017-08-24)

Ozone watch
The symposium covers all issues related to atmospheric ozone, including trends of ozone in the stratosphere and troposphere, ozone-climate interactions, latest emerging techniques for ozone observations, and effects of ozone on human health, ecosystems and food production. Future challenges for stratospheric and tropospheric ozone are highlighted. (2017-02-01)

Ink from ancient Egyptian papyri contains copper
Until recently, it was assumed that the ink used for writing was primarily carbon-based at least until the fourth and fifth centuries AD. But in a new University of Copenhagen study, analyses of 2,000-year-old papyri fragments with X-ray microscopy show that black ink used by Egyptian scribes also contained copper -- an element previously not identified in ancient ink. (2017-11-10)

Researchers bring high res magnetic resonance imaging to nanometer scale
A new technique that brings magnetic resonance imaging to the nanometer scale with unprecedented resolution will open the door for major advances in understanding new materials, virus particles and proteins that cause diseases like Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. (2018-02-21)

'Explosive evolution' of techniques to restore blood flow to the brain
Recent decades have seen an 'explosive evolution' of techniques to restore blood flow to areas of the brain endangered by stroke or clogged arteries, according to a report by Loyola Medicine neurologists and neurosurgeons. (2018-01-19)

Newfound 'organ' had been missed by standard method for visualizing anatomy
Researchers have identified a previously unknown feature of human anatomy with implications for the function of all organs, most tissues and the mechanisms of most major diseases. (2018-03-27)

3-D nanoscale imaging made possible
In a research article '3D Nano-scale Imaging by Plasmonic Brownian Microscopy' published today in Nanophotonics, the team around Prof. Xiang Zhang from the University of California in Berkeley demonstrate a method for meeting this challenge with stunning properties. (2017-12-15)

New 'brick' for nanotechnology: Graphene Nanomesh
Researchers at Japan advanced institute of science and technology (JAIST) successfully fabricated suspended graphene nanomesh (GNM) by using the focused helium ion beam technology. The 2D array of 6nm diameter nanopores were patterned on a large-area suspended graphene uniformly. By systematically controlling the pitch from 15 nm to 50 nm, a series of stable GNM devices were achieved. This technology provides a new approach to explore nanoscale thermal engineering, advanced sensing, and quantum technology. (2020-04-20)

From 2D to 1D: Atomically quasi '1D' wires using a carbon nanotube template
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have used carbon nanotube templates to produce nanowires of transition metal monochalcogenide (TMM), which are only 3 atoms wide in diameter. These are 50 times longer than previous attempts and can be studied in isolation, preserving the properties of atomically quasi '1D' objects. The team saw that single wires twist when perturbed, suggesting that isolated nanowires have unique mechanical properties which might be applied to switching in nanoelectronics. (2019-04-20)

Microscopy: A space-time sensor for light-matter interactions
Physicists from Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich have developed an attosecond electron microscope that allows them to visualize the dispersion of light in time and space, and observe the motions of electrons in atoms. (2017-11-30)

New studies aim to boost social science methods in conservation research
Scientists have produced a series of papers designed to improve research on conservation and the environment. (2018-01-11)

Attosecond physics: A keen sense for molecules
Munich based Laser physicists have developed an extremely powerful broadband infrared light source. This light source opens up a whole new range of opportunities in medicine, life science, and material analysis. (2018-02-23)

Captured on film for the first time: Microglia nibbling on brain synapses
For the first time, EMBL researchers have captured microglia nibbling on brain synapses. Their findings show that the special glial cells help synapses grow and rearrange, demonstrating the essential role of microglia in brain development. Nature Communications will publish the results on March 26. (2018-03-26)

A radical solution comes from mixing tools
The molten surface of a sodium-based material could assist the direct conversion of methane to useful building blocks. (2017-10-03)

A super resolution view of chemical reactions
Researchers from the Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Polish Academy of Sciences have demonstrated, using a super resolution microscopic technique, how to follow chemical reactions taking place in very small volumes. The method of analysis developed by the Warsaw physicists in collaboration with PicoQuant GmbH is the first to make it potentially possible to observe reactions not only inside living cells, but even within individual organelles, such as cell nuclei. (2018-02-09)

Embryo fossils reveal animal complexity 10 million years before Cambrian Explosion
Fossilized embryos predating the Cambrian Explosion by 10 million years provide evidence that early animals had already begun to adopt some of the structures and processes seen in today's embryos, say researchers from Indiana University Bloomington and nine other institutions in this week's Science. (2006-10-12)

Scientists capture colliding organic nanoparticles on video for first time
A Northwestern University research team is the first to capture on video organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing together. This unprecedented view of 'chemistry in motion' will aid Northwestern nanoscientists developing new drug delivery methods as well as demonstrate to researchers around the globe how an emerging imaging technique opens a new window on a very tiny world. (2017-11-17)

Can your brain testify against you?
A review of applications of neuroscience in law, or 'neurolaw,' brings into question the ethical implications that come with the possibility of a person unwillingly revealing their own guilt. (2018-02-02)

Super-resolution microscopy in both space and time
In a breakthrough for biological imaging, EPFL scientists have developed the first microscope platform that can perform super-resolution spatial and temporal imaging, capturing unprecedented views inside living cells. The landmark paper is published in Nature Photonics. (2018-02-27)

Magnet Lab researchers make observing cell functions easier
Now that the genome of humans and many other organisms have been sequenced, biologists are turning their attention to discovering how the many thousands of structural and control genes -- the (2008-05-08)

How to melt gold at room temperature
When the tension rises, unexpected things can happen -- not least when it comes to gold atoms. Researchers from, among others, Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have now managed, for the first time, to make the surface of a gold object melt at room temperature. (2018-11-20)

Individual impurity atoms detectable in graphene
A team including physicists from the University of Basel has succeeded in using atomic force microscopy to clearly obtain images of individual impurity atoms in graphene ribbons. Thanks to the forces measured in the graphene's two-dimensional carbon lattice, they were able to identify boron and nitrogen for the first time, as the researchers report in the journal Science Advances. (2018-04-13)

Drawing is better than writing for memory retention
Researchers from the University of Waterloo found that even if people weren't good at it, drawing, as a method to help retain new information, was better than re-writing notes, visualization exercises or passively looking at images. (2018-12-06)

Trailblazing findings on the properties of daguerreotypes discovered by The Met and UNM
The Metropolitan Museum of Art (The Met) and The University of New Mexico (UNM) today announced the groundbreaking findings of a two-year study of the plasmonic properties of daguerreotypes. (2019-06-10)

Team highlights work on tuning block polymers for nanostructured systems
High-performance materials are enabling major advances in a wide range of applications from energy generation and digital information storage to disease screening and medical devices. Block polymers, which are two or more polymer chains with different properties linked together, show great promise for many of these applications, and a research group at the University of Delaware has made significant strides in their development over the past several years. (2017-03-29)

Biophysicists propose new approach for membrane protein crystallization
Membrane proteins are of great interest to both fundamental research and applied studies (e.g., drug development and optogenetics). Previously, scientistist had to use detergents to stabilize membare proteins (e.g. for x-ray crystallography). For the first time, a team of scientists showed that membrane proteins trapped in synthetic patches of cell membrane called 'nanodiscs' can be transferred into the lipidic cubic phase and crystallized. (2017-03-06)

Cracking eggshell nanostructure
How is it that fertilized chicken eggs manage to resist fracture from the outside, while at the same time, are weak enough to break from the inside during chick hatching? It's all in the eggshell's nanostructure, according to a new study led by McGill University scientists. (2018-03-30)

Nano-sized gold particles have been shaped to behave as clones in biomedicine
A special laser system is able to induce billions of gold nanoparticles to behave as one. The research, published in Science and carried out at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, exploits this unique feature for applications in biomedicine and photonics, from tumor treatments to energy production, thanks to the ability of these particles to absorb or reflect light of a certain color, depending on their geometry. (2017-11-03)

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