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Popular Microtubule News and Current Events

Popular Microtubule News and Current Events, Microtubule News Articles.
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How whip-like cell appendages promote bodily fluid flow
Researchers at Nagoya University revealed that a molecule called Daple is essential for the correct orientation and coordinated beating of cilia on the surface of cells lining ventricles in the brain. (2017-08-18)
Not an illusion: Clever use of mirrors boosts performance of light-sheet microscope
Using a simple 'mirror trick' and not-so-simple computational analysis, scientists affiliated with the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) have considerably improved the speed, efficiency, and resolution of a light-sheet microscope, with broad applications for enhanced imaging of live cells and embryos. (2017-11-17)
Ladies, this is why fertility declines with age
Researchers at the University of Montreal Hospital Research Center (CRCHUM) have discovered a possible new explanation for female infertility. (2017-04-03)
Mechanics of a heartbeat are controlled by molecular strut in heart muscle cells
Using high-resolution microscopy, researchers found that molecular struts called microtubules interact with the heart's contractile machinery to provide mechanical resistance for the beating of the heart, which could provide a better understanding of how microtubules affect the mechanics of the beating heart, and what happens when this goes awry. (2016-04-21)
Autism-linked gene stunts developing dendrites
Increased expression of a gene linked to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) leads to a remodeling of dendrites during brain development, according to a new study conducted in cultured neurons and an ASD mouse model published in JNeurosci. (2017-12-04)
Letting molecular robots swarm like birds
A team of researchers from Hokkaido University and Kansai University has developed DNA-assisted molecular robots that autonomously swarm in response to chemical and physical signals, paving the way for developing future nano-machines. (2018-01-31)
Tau mutations may increase cancer risk
Mutations to the protein tau, commonly associated with neurodegenerative disorders, may serve as a novel risk factor for cancer, according to results published in Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. (2018-05-24)
Cell biology: Dynamics of microtubules
Filamentous polymers called microtubules play vital roles in chromosome segregation and molecular transport. (2018-04-06)
New insights into pruning
When an organism develops, non-specific connections between nerve cells degenerate. (2018-06-26)
UEA research could help fine-tune cancer treatment
Cancer therapies that cut off blood supply to a tumour could be more effective in combination with existing chemotherapeutic drugs -- according to new research from the University of East Anglia. (2018-05-25)
How to build a better railway -- in (almost) every cell in your body
New work from the University of Warwick shows how a microscopic 'railway' system in our cells can optimise its structure to better suit bodies' needs. (2018-03-12)
Women may be more vulnerable to concussions because of 'leaner' nerve fibers, Penn study
Women have smaller, more breakable nerve fibers in the brain compared to men that may make them more susceptible to concussions, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine neuroscientists published online today in the journal Experimental Neurology. (2017-11-27)
Key protein in sperm tail assembly identified
A study, published in the Journal of Cell Biology, focuses on the development of the sperm tail, the structure that enables sperm cells to swim and is therefore critical for male fertility. (2018-05-11)
Evaluation of tau phosphorylation related targets for Alzheimer's disease treatment
InSysBio continues to investigate the mechanisms underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD) using the quantitative systems pharmacology (QSP) modeling approach. (2018-02-27)
Improved understanding of the pathology of dwarfism may lead to new treatment targets
Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a severe inherited dwarfing condition In PSACH, a genetic mutation leads to abnormal retention of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of cartilage-producing cells (chondrocytes), which interferes with function and cell viability. (2018-12-12)
New structure discovered in human sperm tails
A highly effective tail is needed in order for a sperm to be able to swim, and for a baby to be conceived. (2018-02-20)
How to control traffic on cellular highways
Inside cells, protein 'motors' act like trucks on tiny cellular highways to deliver life-sustaining cargoes. (2017-11-09)
The mechanics of anti-tumor activity outlined
Inhibiting the growth and the angiogenic properties of cancer is an important modality for cancer treatment and research. (2003-04-22)
New insight into brain development disorder
Two years ago, the Zika virus drew attention to microcephaly, a developmental disorder in which the brain and skull display inhibited growth. (2017-04-24)
A new molecular player involved in T cell activation
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology have imaged live T cells to reveal the role of CLIP-170 in T-cell activation, a critical process in the immune response. (2018-12-06)
Mitosis gets harder thanks to new gene discovery
A biological process taught to every pupil studying science at high school has just become a little more complicated thanks to a new discovery published today. (2008-04-03)
HKUST researchers reveal new insights into the control of cellular scaffold
HKUST researchers made a breakthrough in understanding how the organization of microtubule cytoskeleton is controlled, revealing an aspect of γTuRC's regulation and demonstrated a previously unknown function of PolD1, a conserved protein that is widely recognized for its role in DNA replication and repair. (2017-11-29)
Study results leading to the development of a new type of anticancer agent
A wide variety of research has shown that γ-tubulin activates during cell division and that it is overexpressed in a portion of cancer cells, so it holds potential as a target protein for new anticancer agents with few side effects. (2016-01-20)
Discovery of agile molecular motors could aid in treating motor neuron diseases
Over the last several months, the labs of Yale Goldman and Erika Holzbaur, from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, have published a group of papers that, taken together, show proteins that function as molecular motors are surprisingly flexible and agile, able to navigate obstacles within the cell. (2006-07-17)
Colon cancer: APC protein affects immunity by preventing pre-cancerous inflammation
Adenomatous polyposis coli is a gene whose mutations are associated with a rare, hereditary form of colorectal cancer known as familial adenomatous polyposis. (2017-10-24)
New regulator of neuron formation identified
The protein NEK7 regulates neuron formation, as it is required for dendrite growth and branching, as well as the formation and shaping of dendritic spines. (2018-06-27)
Keeping our cells stable: A closer look at microtubules
Microtubules help to regulate cell structure throughout our bodies. A group of Japanese researchers have used cryo-electron microscopy to shed light on how a certain protein keeps microtubules stable, and regulates microtubule-based transport within cells. (2018-10-01)
How the cell finds its center
Yeast cells place their nucleus in the center of the cell, where the nucleus helps define where the cell will later divide in half. (2001-04-16)
Regulation of cell orientation and shape for tissue morphogenesis
A collaborative research group led by Kumamoto University has developed a new control system for regulating the morphology and orientation of cells that constitute animal tissues. (2018-07-24)
Art advancing science at the nanoscale
Could studying molecular biology ever be as fun as watching a Star Wars movie? (2017-10-18)
Marathon-running molecule could speed up the race for new neurological treatments
Scientists at the University of Warwick have discovered a new process that sets the fastest molecular motor on its marathon-like runs through our neurons. (2019-07-12)
HyPer-Tau provides spatially-resolved hydrogen peroxide sensing in cells
By attaching a hydrogen peroxide reporter protein to cellular microtubule structures, researchers have developed the first sensor able to show the location of the key cellular signaling chemical inside living cells with high resolution over time. (2015-12-03)
Machinery used in basic cell division does double duty as builder of neurons
Researchers at the San Diego branch of the Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research at University of California San Diego have identified an entirely new mechanism underlying the development and structure of the nervous system during embryogenesis. (2019-02-28)
Study: Tau does not stabilize microtubules, challenges approach to treating Alzheimer's
Though it is widely believed that tau protein stabilizes microtubules in neurons of the brain, new research suggests just the opposite: tau lengthens microtubules and keeps them dynamic. (2018-06-28)
How our cellular antennas are formed
Most of our cells contain an immobile primary cilium. The 'skeleton' of the cilium consists of microtubule doublets, which are 'pairs' of proteins essential for their formation and function. (2019-01-17)
Kinesin-5 structure opens cancer drug targets
The structure of a key part of the machinery that allows cells to divide has been identified by researchers at UC Davis -- opening new possibilities for throwing a wrench in the machine and blocking runaway cell division in cancer. (2014-04-08)
Tiny but toxic: MBL researchers discover a mechanism of neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease
Particles of amyloid beta that have not clumped into plaques severely disrupt neurotransmission and delivery of key proteins in Alzheimer's disease, two new studies by MBL scientists show. (2009-03-26)
Scientists develop method to tweak tiny 'antenna' on cells
Scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine and the National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan say they have found a fast way to manipulate a cell's cilia, the tiny, fingerlike protrusions that 'feel' and sense their microscopic environment. (2018-05-15)
Motor protein may offer promise in ovarian cancer treatment
A motor regulatory protein can block human ovarian tumor growth, leading to eventual cancer cell death and possible new therapies to treat the disease, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2011-04-26)
Parental chromosomes kept apart during embryo's first division
It was long thought that during an embryo's first cell division, one spindle is responsible for segregating the embryo's chromosomes into two cells. (2018-07-12)
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