Popular Minimally Invasive Surgery News and Current Events

Popular Minimally Invasive Surgery News and Current Events, Minimally Invasive Surgery News Articles.
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MD Anderson study evaluates need for biopsies during follow-up care in women with early breast cancer
In an analysis of more than 120,000 women diagnosed with and treated for early-stage breast cancer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center determined the rate of additional breast biopsies needed for these patients during their follow-up care. The findings, reported in JAMA Surgery, are the first comprehensive nationwide population-based study regarding the need for breast biopsies performed during follow up after treatment for invasive breast cancer. (2018-01-31)

New 3D imaging analysis technique could lead to improved arthritis treatment
An algorithm to monitor the joints of patients with arthritis, which could change the way that the severity of the condition is assessed, has been developed by a team of engineers, physicians and radiologists led by the University of Cambridge. (2018-06-18)

Decoding robotic surgery skills
Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of USC are looking to technology to help deconstruct expert surgeons' robotic surgery skills so they can create an objective, standardized way to train the next generation of surgeons. (2018-09-11)

Not just images
Hebrew University scientists have successfully transformed an MRI from a diagnostic camera into a device that can record changes in the biological makeup of brain tissue. The development will help doctors understand whether a patient is merely aging or developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. (2019-09-05)

Metabolite that promotes cancer cell transformation and colorectal cancer spread identified
Osaka University researchers revealed that the metabolite D-2-hydroxyglurate (D-2HG) promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition of colorectal cancer cells, leading them to develop features of lower adherence to neighboring cells, increased invasiveness, and greater likelihood of metastatic spread. The finding highlights the value of targeting D-2HG to establish new therapeutic approaches against colorectal cancer. (2016-12-01)

NIH study finds heavily processed foods cause overeating and weight gain
People eating ultra-processed foods ate more calories and gained more weight than when they ate a minimally processed diet, according to results from a National Institutes of Health study. The difference occurred even though meals provided to the volunteers in both the ultra-processed and minimally processed diets had the same number of calories and macronutrients. The results were published in Cell Metabolism. (2019-05-16)

Does MRI plus mammography improve detection of new breast cancer after breast conservation therapy?
A new article published by JAMA Oncology compares outcomes for combined mammography and MRI or ultrasonography screenings for new breast cancers in women who have previously undergone breast conservation surgery and radiotherapy for breast cancer initially diagnosed at 50 or younger. (2017-06-22)

Oncotarget: Researchers identify a potential molecular trigger for invasiveness in prostate cancer cells
A small protein modification can trigger the aggressive migratory and invasive properties of prostate cancer cells, according to new research published on the cover of Oncotarget. The findings give greater insight into how cancers can move from one location in the body to another, and could help develop more effective therapies in the future. Editorial by Xin Ye and Robert A. Weinberg can be found online. (2017-11-20)

New method increases life span of donated brain tissue
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have developed a method that enables them to use donated brain tissue from people with epilepsy for 48 hours. Previously, the researchers only had 12 hours to test new treatments before the structure of the cells started to break down. The research has now been published in the journal Scientific Reports. (2018-03-09)

Delaying adjuvant chemo associated with worse outcomes for patients with triple-negative breast cancer
Patients with triple-negative breast cancer who delayed starting adjuvant chemotherapy for more than 30 days after surgery were at significantly higher risk for disease recurrence and death compared with those who started the treatment in the first 30 days after surgery, according to a retrospective study presented at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (2018-12-05)

Research shows physical activity does not improve after hip replacement
New research from the University of East Anglia (UEA) shows that, surprisingly, patients' physical activity does not increase following hip replacement surgery. (2016-10-23)

Engineering heart valves for the many
The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering and the University of Zurich announced today a cross-institutional team effort to generate a functional heart valve replacement with the capacity for repair, regeneration, and growth. The team is also working towards a GMP-grade version of their customizable, scalable, and cost-effective manufacturing process that would enable deployment to a large patient population. In addition, the new heart valve would be compatible with minimally invasive procedures to serve both pediatric and adult patients. (2017-05-18)

Simple breathing training with a physiotherapist before surgery prevents postoperative pneumonia
Pneumonia, and other serious lung complications, after major abdominal surgery were halved when patients were seen by a physiotherapist before surgery and taught breathing exercises that the patient needed to start performing immediately on waking from the operation, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-24)

For patients with esophageal cancer, status of lymph nodes after preoperative therapy determines survival
The status of lymph nodes rather than the status of the primary tumor following preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy is the most important factor that determines whether patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer will survive. The study presented at the AATS 98th Annual Meeting indicates that while preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy improve survival of patients with esophageal cancer, patients with malignant lymph nodes following therapy were less likely to survive than patients with no cancer in the lymph nodes. (2018-05-01)

New tool predicts risk of heart attack in older surgery patients
A tool designed to more accurately predict the risk of heart attack in older patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery works significantly better than traditional risk assessment tools. By having more accurate information, older patients and their physicians can make an informed decision on whether to undergo surgery. (2017-11-16)

Surgery to remove unaffected breast in early breast cancer increases
The proportion of women in the United States undergoing surgery for early-stage breast cancer who have preventive mastectomy to remove the unaffected breast increased significantly in recent years, particularly among younger women, and varied substantially across states. (2017-03-29)

A protein makes the difference
It is well-established knowledge that blood vessels foster the growth of tumors. Preventing the formation of tumors is a standard part of cancer therapy. A study by researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg has discovered a new, surprising role played by blood vessels: under certain conditions they can inhibit tumor growth. (2016-10-18)

Stem cells from diabetic patients coaxed to become insulin-secreting cells
Signaling a potential new approach to treating diabetes, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and Harvard University have produced insulin-secreting cells from stem cells derived from patients with type 1 diabetes. The new discovery suggests a personalized treatment approach to diabetes may be on the horizon -- one that relies on the patients' own stem cells to manufacture new cells that make insulin. (2016-05-10)

Researchers help develop new antifungal drug
University researchers, working with F2G Limited (Eccles, Manchester), have developed a new antifungal drug to help in the treatment of life threatening invasive fungal infections such as invasive aspergillosis. (2017-10-06)

After the heart attack: Injectable gels could prevent future heart failure (video)
During a heart attack, clots or narrowed arteries block blood flow, harming or killing cells in the heart. But damage doesn't end after the crushing pain subsides. Instead, the heart's walls thin out, the organ becomes enlarged, and scar tissue forms. These changes can cause heart failure. Scientists now report they have developed injectable gels to prevent this damage. They present their work at the 252nd National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2016-08-22)

Fast evolution affects everyone, everywhere
Rapid evolution of other species happens all around us all the time -- and many of the most extreme examples are associated with human influences. (2016-12-05)

Young breast cancer patients undergoing breast conserving surgery see improved prognosis
A new analysis indicates that breast cancer prognoses have improved over time in young women treated with breast conserving surgery. (2017-08-09)

Enhanced MR-guided focused ultrasound guidelines demonstrate improved efficacy and durability
Data released today show that MR-guided focused ultrasound is a more effective option for a broader population of uterine fibroid sufferers. In a poster presented today at the American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology annual meeting in San Diego, Phyllis Gee, M.D., of the North Texas Uterine Fibroid Institute in Plano, Texas, showed that women undergoing MRgFUS experience rapid and sustained relief from their condition and have a reduced need for alternative, invasive treatments in the future. (2007-05-08)

Bullies and their victims more likely to want plastic surgery
11.5 percent of bullying victims have extreme desire to have cosmetic surgery, as well as 3.4 percent of bullies and 8.8 percent of teenagers who both bully and are bullied -- compared with less than 1 percent of those who are unaffected by bullying. (2017-04-27)

High success rate reported for diabetic Charcot foot surgery
Nearly four out of five diabetic patients with severe cases of a disabling condition called Charcot foot were able to walk normally again following surgery, a Loyola Medicine study has found. (2017-12-14)

New treatment option for ruptured brain aneurysms
Researchers in Finland have identified an effective new treatment option using stent-assisted coil embolization on patients who have suffered a ruptured brain aneurysm, a potentially life-threatening event, according to a new study. (2009-08-25)

Robotic surgery just got more autonomous
Putting surgery one step closer into the realm of self-driving cars and intelligent machines, researchers show for the first time that a supervised autonomous robot can successfully perform soft tissue surgery. (2016-05-04)

Regular exercise halves complication rate after lung cancer surgery
Exercising regularly before surgery for lung cancer halves the complication rate afterwards, finds a synthesis of the available published evidence in the British Journal of Sports Medicine. (2018-02-01)

Patients who achieve short-term weight loss before bariatric surgery have better outcomes
Patients who lose some excess weight prior to weight loss surgery achieve greater weight loss after surgery, and also experience shorter hospital stays and shorter procedures, according to Journal of American College of Surgeons study findings. (2018-02-02)

Improving cell transplantation after spinal cord injury: When, where and how?
Spinal cord injuries are mostly caused by trauma, often incurred in road traffic or sporting incidents, often with devastating and irreversible consequences. According to a systematic analysis of 49 animal studies published this week in PLOS Biology by Ralf Watzlawick, Jan Schwab and colleagues, after experimental spinal cord injury, transplanting olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) into the site of damage significantly improves locomotor performance. (2016-05-31)

Surgery & combination therapy optimizes results in aggressive prostate cancer management
Results published today in JAMA Oncology suggest post-operative radiation and hormone therapy, before cancer recurrence, as a new prostate cancer treatment option for men with a Gleason Score of 9 or 10. (2018-11-15)

Engineers harness the power of 3-D printing to help train surgeons, shorten surgery times
A team of engineers and pediatric orthopedic surgeons are using 3-D printing to help train surgeons and shorten surgeries for the most common hip disorder found in children ages 9 to 16. In a recent study, researchers showed that allowing surgeons to prep on a 3-D-printed model of the patient's hip joint cut by about 25 percent the amount of time needed for surgery when compared to a control group. (2017-08-02)

Weight loss surgery linked to an increased risk of inflammatory bowel disease
A new Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics analysis has found a link between the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and a past history of weight loss surgery. (2018-03-07)

New statistics reveal the shape of plastic surgery
The American Society of Plastic Surgeons released new data which shows continued growth in cosmetic procedures over the last year. (2018-03-01)

Weight loss surgery's effects on bone marrow fat and bone mass
Bone marrow fat is thought to regulate bone metabolism, and high levels of marrow fat are seen in states of low bone mass, severe underweight, and diabetes. (2017-08-09)

Study shows influence of surgeons on likelihood of removal of healthy breast after breast cancer dia
Attending surgeons can have a strong influence on whether a patient undergoes contralateral prophylactic mastectomy after a diagnosis of breast cancer, according to a study published by JAMA Surgery. (2017-09-13)

Is there a difference in patient outcomes if a surgeon is involved in overlapping surgeries?
Overlapping surgery, defined as a surgeon's involvement in two operations scheduled at the same or overlapping times, appeared safe for patients undergoing neurosurgery. (2017-11-08)

Migraine surgery produces 'dramatic improvements' in functioning, study finds
In addition to reducing headache frequency and severity, surgical treatment for migraine leads to significant improvements in everyday functioning and coping ability, according to a study in the January issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery®, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). (2018-01-02)

Fear of 'killer shrimps' could pose major threat to European rivers
The fear of invasive 'killer shrimps' can intimidate native organisms to such a degree that they are incapable of performing their vital role in river systems, a new study suggests. (2019-06-04)

Bariatric surgery lowers cancer risk for severely obese patients
Bariatric surgery lowers the risk of cancer for severely obese patients. The risks drop most for postmenopausal breast cancer, endometrial cancer, pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. (2017-10-05)

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