Popular Minority Students News and Current Events

Popular Minority Students News and Current Events, Minority Students News Articles.
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Research finds college students with ADHD are likely to experience significant challenges
In one of largest and most comprehensive investigations of college students with ADHD ever conducted, new research confirms students with ADHD face significant challenges across all four years of college and predicts ways academic outcomes can be improved. (2021-02-23)

Technology in higher education: learning with it instead of from it
Technology has shifted the way that professors teach students in higher education. For example, by uploading recorded lectures online, students can reference a digital copy of the topics discussed in class. However, lecture-based teaching traditionally leaves students as consumers of information solely with little room for student creativity or interaction. (2020-02-24)

Lessons in learning
A new Harvard study shows that, though students felt like they learned more from traditional lectures, they actually learned more when taking part in active learning classrooms. (2019-09-05)

Malcolm Gladwell published in the Journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology
In his best sellers 'The Tipping Point,' 'Blink' and 'Outliers,' Malcolm Gladwell writes about the unexpected implications of scientific research, urging readers to think different. In an editorial published this month in Ophthalmology, the journal of the American Academy of Ophthalmology, Gladwell offers another example of his stock in trade: to make medical students better doctors, send them to art school. (2018-01-03)

Pascali honored for contributions to engineering education
Raresh Pascali, instructional associate professor in the Mechanical Engineering Technology Program at the University of Houston, has been named the 2016 recipient of the Ross Kastor Educator Award. The award, named for a longtime drilling engineer with Shell Oil Co., is presented by the petroleum division of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. It recognizes dedication to improving engineering and science awareness for students and improving educational opportunities for future industry leaders. (2016-05-17)

UI Cancer Center, Governors State to address cancer disparities in south suburbs
The University of Illinois Cancer Center and Governors State University have received a joint four-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to help both institutions conduct community-based research to reduce cancer-related health disparities in Chicago's south suburbs. (2015-10-13)

Teen gamers have as many friends as non-gamers
Young digital gamers do not have fewer friends at school than their non-gamer peers, two new research articles from Uppsala University indicate. (2018-03-08)

Minorities underrepresented in US special education classrooms
Although minority children are frequently reported to be overrepresented in special education classrooms, a team of researchers suggests that minority children are less likely than otherwise similar white children to receive help for disabilities. (2015-06-24)

School performance and body weight affects kids' self-esteem, study shows
It's well-known that within the adult population body weight and self esteem are very much inter related. But until now, the same wasn't known about children's healthy body weight and its relationship with a positive self-image. (2009-01-20)

Dyslexia does not reduce pass rates for UK GP licensing exam
A study led by academics at the University of Lincoln has found that UK GPs who declare dyslexia prior to taking the AKT are just as likely to pass the knowledge component of the licensing exam as their counterparts. Candidates who declared dyslexia after initially failing the exam were more likely to be minority ethnic candidates with a primary medical qualification outside of the UK. (2018-02-12)

Engineering success
Academically strong, low-income would-be engineers get the boost they need to complete their undergraduate degrees. (2016-11-28)

How well will the flu vaccine work this winter?
Scientists from UTMB and Biomed Protection predicted which H3N2 variants would become 'vaccine resistant', and this prediction has been confirmed during the 2017 Australian flu season. The results published suggest that the current flu vaccine will work better during the 2018 US flu season than the 2017 Australian flu season. (2017-12-13)

Study: Student attitudes toward cheating may spill over into their careers
A study co-authored by an SF State marketing professor finds that students who tolerate cheating in the classroom may also turn a blind eye to unethical behavior in the workplace. (2019-11-27)

Individual education programs not being used as intended in special education
Gone are the days when students with disabilities were placed in a separate classroom, or even in a completely different part of the school. These students often sit alongside their traditional student peers for at least part of the day, with the help of individualized education programs (IEPs). (2018-03-13)

The future of minority health and health disparities research is here
Thirty specific research strategies were identified across the three pillars that guided the science visioning: methods and measurement, etiology, and interventions. (2019-02-01)

For city kids with asthma, telemedicine and in-school care cut ER visits in half
Urban children with asthma who received a combination of telemedicine support and school-based medication therapy were less than half as likely to need an emergency room or hospital visit for their asthma. (2018-01-09)

Mandatory nutrition policies may impact sugar consumption
Mandatory nutrition policies could be a valuable tool in helping high school students to lower their sugar intake, a University of Waterloo study has found. (2018-03-28)

Ethnic diversity in schools may be good for students' grades, a UC Davis study suggests
The findings suggest that schools might look for ways to provide cross-ethnic interaction among students to take advantage of ethnic diversity. (2017-09-11)

People of Black and Asian ethnicity up to twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 as those of White ethnicity
People of Black ethnicity are twice as likely to be infected with COVID-19 compared to those of White ethnicity. People from Asian backgrounds are 1.5 times more likely to become infected with the virus compared to White individuals. Those of Asian ethnicities may be at higher risk of admission to an intensive therapy unit (ITU) and death. (2020-11-12)

Student self-reporting can help educators catch academic and mental health problems early
Stephen Kilgus, an associate professor in the Department of Educational, School and Counseling Psychology in the College of Education at the University of Missouri, is analyzing how a new screening tool, which is completed by students, can help teachers identify potential academic, social and emotional problems. The data might help give teachers better tools to improve children's lives in the classroom and beyond. (2017-11-09)

The reasons that university students do sport
The research shows that female students do it for health reason and male students do it for social relationships that are involved in doing sport. Among those who had stopped doing or never done sport, a lack of time was the main reason. (2018-02-14)

Stereotypes still affect females' career aspirations in STEM topics
Study investigates the impact of stereotypes and the role of family, school and society on the self-concept of females already studying these scientific subjects and found that these stereotypes do impact the self-concept of females already studying these scientific subjects. (2017-06-22)

Study finds troubling consequences for anti-Muslim and anti-Mexican attitudes and actions
In a study conducted during the 2016 US Republican Primaries, researchers from Penn and Northwestern found that Americans hold dehumanizing views of Muslims and Mexican immigrants, and as a result of feeling dehumanized, these groups become more likely to favor violent action over nonviolent and are less likely to assist with counterterrorism. (2017-02-06)

Study examines adolescents' responses to racism in school
When adolescents read a hypothetical scenario about verbal racism in school, age, ethnicity, cross-group friendships, and ethnic socialization predicted their bystander responses. (2017-06-08)

Requiring physical activity classes help sedentary college students be more active
Requiring physical activity classes in college encourages sedentary students to become more active, while elective classes tend to draw those who are already motivated, new research from Oregon State University has found. (2018-09-12)

Could handheld electronic devices contribute to carpal tunnel syndrome?
In a study of 48 university students, intensive users of electronic devices reported more wrist/hand pain than non-intensive users. (2017-06-21)

Racism is a public health issue
Racism may be important in the development of illness and countering it should be considered a public health issue, argues a senior psychiatrist in this week's BMJ. (2003-01-09)

US educators awarded for exemplary teaching in mathematics
Janet Heine Barnett, Caren Diefenderfer, and Tevian Dray were named the 2017 Deborah and Franklin Tepper Haimo Award winners by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA) for their teaching effectiveness and influence beyond their institutions. The three math professors were honored for their contributions to mathematics education on Jan. 5 in Atlanta at the Joint Mathematics Meetings, the world's largest gathering of mathematicians. (2017-01-05)

Occupational therapy improves health, quality of life of young adults with diabetes
New results from a University of Southern California-led research study demonstrates the distinct value of occupational therapy for improving the health and quality of life of young adults living with diabetes. Research participants who completed the occupational therapy intervention program significantly improved their average blood glucose levels, diabetes-related quality of life and habits for checking blood glucose. (2018-01-19)

Improve evolution education by teaching genetics first
Evolution is a difficult concept for many students at all levels, however, a study publishing on May 23 in the open access journal PLOS Biology has demonstrated a simple cost-free way to significantly improve students' understanding of evolution at the secondary level: teach genetics before you teach them evolution. (2017-05-23)

Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London. (2018-01-24)

Study finds a dearth of mental health interventions for ethnic minority youth in the US
A research team from Arizona State University, DePaul University and the University of Southern California analyzed how effective evidence-based mental health intervention programs were for ethnic minority youth in the United States. Four treatment programs met the criteria of 'well-established.' These treatments addressed substance abuse, disruptive behavior and anxiety in Hispanic/Latino and African-American youth. Native-American and Asian-American youth were underrepresented or absent from research studies on mental health intervention programs. (2019-02-08)

Imagining a successful future can help students overcome everyday difficulties
Having a clear picture in mind of what their future will look like can motivate students to keep going despite the challenges of college life. This strategy seems to be particularly effective for female students from relatively low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds says Mesmin Destin of Northwestern University in the US. He is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion. (2018-01-24)

African-American teens' perceptions of racial discrimination
A three-year study of 14-18-year-old African American teens finds that many African American teens consider themselves the victims of racial discrimination. These perceptions are linked to how the teens feel about being African American, particularly their views of how the broader society sees African Americans. These findings have implications for parents and teachers and also suggest the need to bolster African-American youths' feelings about their racial group membership. (2009-04-29)

Community factors and social connection may determine whether sexual minority parents view their community as tolerant versus supportive
A new Family Relations study has found that lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) parents feel more positive about where they live when that place is more legally, politically, and religiously supportive of LGB people; when there are more LGB-friendly employers; and when there are other LBG-headed households. (2017-12-20)

New study addresses the role of health in climate lawsuits
Researchers at the George Washington University (GW) are at the forefront of analyzing how climate lawsuits shape the nation's response to climate change. A new analysis investigates the role of health concerns in climate litigation since 1990 and finds that although health is cited in a minority of cases, it may have critical potential for protecting communities from the effects of climate change and coal fired power plants. (2018-04-26)

How can students with autism be supported through college?
Thirty years ago it was rare for a student with ASD to enter college. But over the past decades, there has been much improvement in the detection and awareness of ASD in children. Now, with the provision of effective treatments, those with average or above average intellectual abilities are enrolling at universities. Now a special issue addressing the experiences of ASD students has been published in Springer's Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. (2018-01-31)

Web-based teaching can improve science understanding for struggling pupils
Web-based learning tools can help deepen science knowledge among all middle school students, and ease the science literacy gap for underachieving students, according to a three-year study published today in the International Journal of Science Education. (2018-02-12)

Diabetes may be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancer
A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute indicates that recent-onset type 2 diabetes may be early expression of pancreatic cancer. Diabetes was associated with a more than twofold higher risk of pancreatic cancer in African-Americans and Latinos, but recent-onset diabetes was associated with a 2.3-fold greater increase in risk of pancreatic cancer than long-standing diabetes. (2018-06-18)

Study finds minority trainees are up, but not minority faculty
Despite increasing numbers of underrepresented minority (URM) trainees in the biomedical sciences, there is a persistent shortage of URM faculty who are involved in basic biomedical research at medical schools. Vanderbilt investigators examined the entire training pathway of potential faculty candidates to identify points of greatest loss of URM trainees. They report Jan. 16 in PLOS ONE two key points of loss: during undergraduate education and in transition from postdoctoral fellowship to tenure-track faculty. (2018-01-17)

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