Popular Molecule News and Current Events

Popular Molecule News and Current Events, Molecule News Articles.
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Molecular switch detects metals in the environment
A team led by researchers from the University of Geneva, Switzerland, has designed a family of molecules capable of binding to metal ions present in its environment and providing an easily detectable light signal during binding. This new type of sensor forms a 3D structure whose molecules consist of a ring and two luminescent arms that emit a particular type of light in a process called circular polarized luminescence, and detect ions, such as sodium. (2018-08-15)

Tool encoded in coronaviruses provides a potential target for COVID-19
Coronaviruses exploit our cells so they can make copies of themselves inside us. (2021-02-23)

Striped glow sticks
It may be possible to reach new levels of miniaturization, speed, and data processing with optical quantum computers, which use light to carry information. For this, we need materials that can absorb and transmit photons. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, Chinese scientists have introduced a new strategy for constructing photonic heterostructure crystals with tunable properties. Using a crystalline rod with stripes that fluoresce in different colors, they have developed a prototype of a logic gate. (2019-08-06)

A new way to display the 3-D structure of molecules
Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley Researchers have developed nanoscale display cases that enables new atomic-scale views of hard-to-study chemical and biological samples. (2016-08-18)

A molecule that directs neurons
A research team coordinated by the University of Trento studied a mass of brain cells, the habenula, linked to disorders like autism, schizophrenia and depression. The results of their work, published in 'Development', will help find out more about serious brain disorders that can only be treated in ways that take a toll on the quality of life of people. (2020-03-24)

Huntington's disease provides new cancer weapon
Patients with Huntington's disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population. Scientists have discovered why Huntington's is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports. (2018-02-12)

Optical tweezers steer a chemical reaction from just 2 atoms
Highlighting the fine level of control modern chemists possess, researchers have trapped two single atoms -- sodium and cesium -- in separate 'optical tweezers' and then maneuvered them together, resulting in a single molecule of sodium cesium (NaCs) with unique properties. (2018-04-12)

Zigzag DNA
How the cell organizes DNA into tightly packed chromosomes. Nature publication by Delft University of Technology and EMBL Heidelberg. (2020-03-04)

Organic molecule benzonitrile detected in space
Scientists studying a cold molecular cloud of the Taurus region with radio telescopes have detected the presence of a particular organic molecule called benzonitrile. The finding marks the first time a specific aromatic molecule has been identified in space using radio spectroscopy. (2018-01-11)

Climate game changer
New research from University of Alberta and University of Vienna microbiologists provides unparalleled insight into the Earth's nitrogen cycle, identifying and characterizing the ammonia-oxidizing microbe, Nitrospira inopinata. (2017-08-23)

Molecular memory can be used to increase the memory capacity of hard disks
Researchers at the University of Jyväskylä have taken part in an international British-Finnish-Chinese collaboration where the first molecule capable of remembering the direction of a magnetic above liquid nitrogen temperatures has been prepared and characterized. The results may be used in the future to massively increase the storage capacity of hard disks without increasing their physical size. (2018-10-18)

New system can identify drugs to target 'undruggable' enzymes critical in many diseases
A new drug discovery system allows scientists to specifically target members of an important family of enzymes, called phosphatases, which were previously considered mostly 'undruggable'. The study, published in Cell, demonstrated the capabilities of the new system by identifying a molecule that could successfully target a phosphatase to reduce the accumulation of Huntington's disease-associated proteins in the brains of mice. (2018-07-26)

Discovery of a mechanism for determining the direction of collective cell migration
The phenomenon of collective cell migration has been observed in the process of animal development, the healing of wounds, and cancer cell invasion. Professors Kazuhiro Aoki et al. of the National Institute for Basic Biology have found that when the activity of a molecule called ERK MAP kinase is propagated to neighboring cells, the cells migrate in the opposite direction of ERK propagation. (2017-12-04)

One step closer to understanding explosive sensitivity with molecule design
Explosives have an inherent problem -- they should be perfectly safe for handling and storage but detonate reliably on demand. (2018-04-18)

Researchers discover key link between mitochondria and cocaine addiction
Scientists at the University of Maryland School of Medicine identified significant mitochondrial changes that take place in cocaine addiction, and they have been able to block them. (2017-12-20)

A new solution for chronic pain
Neuropathic pain is a chronic illness affecting 7-10 percent of the population in France and for which there is no effective treatment. Researchers at the Institute for Neurosciences of Montpellier (INSERM/Université de Montpellier) and the Laboratory for Therapeutic Innovation (CNRS/Université de Strasbourg) have uncovered the mechanism behind the appearance and continuation of pain. Based on their discovery, an innovative treatment was developed which produces, in animal subjects, an immediate, robust and long-lasting therapeutic effect on pain symptoms. (2018-03-12)

Microbes can grow on nitric oxide
Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. A study by Boran Kartal from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany, and colleagues reveals that microorganisms can grow on NO. Their results, which are now published in Nature Communications, change our view of the earth's nitrogen cycle and how microorganisms regulate the release of greenhouse gases from natural and man-made environments. (2019-03-18)

Breakthrough brings gene-editing medicine one step closer to patient applications
Researchers at the University of Alberta have discovered a way to greatly improve the accuracy of gene-editing technology by replacing the natural guide molecule it uses with a synthetic one called a bridged nucleic acid, or BNA. The research promises to bring the technology much closer to therapeutic reality. (2018-04-13)

Nature: Tricky feat with stand-up molecule
Scientists from Forschungszentrum Jülich have achieved a new level of precision working with single molecules. They succeeded in placing an ultrathin molecule in an upright position on a flat layer of silver atoms -- and the molecule remained standing instead of reverting to its naturally favoured position. The artificial structure described in Nature illustrates the potential of novel molecular fabrication methods. (2018-06-27)

How solvent molecules cooperate in reactions
Molecules from the solvent environment that at first glance seem to be uninvolved can be essential for chemical reactions. This has been shown by researchers studying the formation of an ether in pure solvents and in their mixtures. They explained the underlying mechanisms in detail using advanced spectroscopic and theoretical techniques. Conclusion: even solvent molecules that do not participate directly in the reaction are essential for the reaction process and can significantly influence reaction partners. (2016-10-06)

Water, water -- the two types of liquid water
There are two types of liquid water, according to research carried out by an international scientific collaboration. This new peculiarity adds to the growing list of strange phenomena in what we imagine is a simple substance. The discovery could have implications for making and using nanoparticles as well as in understanding how proteins fold into their working shape in the body or misfold to cause diseases such as Alzheimer's or CJD. (2016-11-10)

Three-in-one molecule shows promise in helping certain breast cancer patients
A newly designed three-part molecule could be the one answer patients with a certain form of breast cancer are looking for, scientists report. This chimera, created by a team at the Georgia Cancer Center, has the ability to simultaneously decrease the expression of three growth factors that are over-expressed in some cancers. (2018-03-22)

Osaka chemists build new chemical structures on unreactive bonds
Osaka University organic chemists transform strong carbon fluorine bonds into crowded quaternary carbon centers with cobalt catalyzed Grignard chemistry. (2017-07-26)

A common electronic language for magnetic resonance
The standards used to re-transcribed the collected data in organic chemistry is however specific to each laboratory, making it difficult to export the information electronically. An international team headed by chemists from UNIGE has developed a new common electronic language around two main features: it translates the data of each molecule in exactly the same way and makes it simple to export it from one information system to another. (2018-06-06)

Researchers put the bite on mosquitoes
Few things sting like a mosquito's bite -- especially if that bite carries a disease such as malaria, yellow fever, Dengue fever or West Nile virus. But if a team of University of Arizona researchers has its way, one day mosquito bites may prove deadly to the mosquitoes. (2008-01-16)

Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect
Researchers from IOCB Prague and IP CAS demonstrated for the first time a single molecule piezoelectric effect. The study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society represents a breakthrough in understanding the electromechanical behavior of individual molecules and provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale. (2018-02-15)

Mass production of new class of semiconductors closer to reality
Two Waterloo chemists have made it easier for manufacturers to produce a new class of faster and cheaper semiconductors. (2018-02-09)

Graphene-Adsorbate van der Waals bonding memory inspires 'smart' graphene sensors
Electric field modulation of the graphene-adsorbate interaction induces unique van der Waals (vdW) bonding which were previously assumed to be randomized by thermal energy after the electric field is turned off. We show that the vdW bonding lasts for hours after turning-off the electric field, exhibiting a charge-transfer and carrier scattering memory useful for 'beyond sensing' applications in molecular identification, memory devices and conformational switches. (2020-07-16)

Radiation-guided nanoparticles zero in on metastatic cancer
Zap a tumor with radiation to trigger expression of a molecule, then attack that molecule with a drug-loaded nanoparticle. (2016-06-29)

Understanding the strange behavior of water
The properties of water have fascinated scientists for centuries, but yet its unique behavior remains a mystery. (2018-03-27)

Deciphering plant immunity against parasites
Nematodes are a huge threat to agriculture since they parasitize important crops such as wheat, soybean, and banana; but plants can defend themselves. Researchers at Bonn University, together with collaborators from the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, identified a protein that allows plants to recognize a chemical signal from the worm and initiate immune responses against the invaders. This discovery will help to develop crop plants that feature enhanced protection against this type of parasites. (2017-04-13)

Scientists discover molecule that could revert celular ageing
Researchers at Instituto de Medicina Molecular (iMM) João Lobo Antunes have found that manipulating a single RNA molecule is enough to revert celular ageing. (2018-01-08)

Morphing twisted nanoscale objects to tailor applications in future technologies
For the first time scientists have created a way to model the interaction between light and twisted molecules, as these molecules transition from left- to right-handed versions, or vice versa. The transitional forms offer a deeper insight into material symmetries and their unexpected behavior could lead to improved design of telecoms components. (2018-05-03)

McMaster University engineers make drug testing more efficient and affordable
McMaster University engineers have devised a way to make testing for new drugs more efficient and affordable, and reduce the time for helpful medications to reach the public. (2018-02-09)

Discovery could lead to better asthma treatment
Scientists have made a discovery that could lead to improved treatment for asthma sufferers. They have found that blocking a certain signalling molecule can alleviate symptoms such as mucus production, swelling (edema), and constriction of the airways in the lungs. (2016-04-21)

The inner lives of molecules
Researchers from Canada, the UK and Germany have developed a new experimental technique to take 3-D images of molecules in action. This tool can help scientists better understand the quantum mechanics underlying bigger and more complex molecules. They describe their work in this week's The Journal of Chemical Physics. (2017-04-04)

Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALS
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are part of an international team that has identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for limiting muscle, is activated. (2018-01-19)

Folding molecules into screw-shaped structures
An international research team describes the methods of winding up molecules into screw-shaped structures. With the aid of artificial molecules, the researchers imitated the principles underlying the assigning a specific function to biomolecules in nature. Giving artificial molecules a specific helical shape has posed a considerable challenge, because it has been difficult to control if a molecule would wind up in the shape of a left-handed or right-handed screw. This is where the team from France, Germany and Japan made a breakthrough. (2016-04-25)

A novel anticandidal compound containing sulfur from endophytic fungus
There is a continuous search for new, safe and relatively cheaper drugs with the advent of new diseases and increasing antibiotic resistance. Endophtyes having the potential to synthesize a wide array of bioactive compounds is an attractive alternative. They have the potential not only to synthesize plant metabolites but also a host of other natural products exhibiting a broad spectrum of structural and chemical diversities exhibiting biological activity and therefore can serve as lead molecule(s) for designing new drugs. (2016-11-25)

Visible signals from brain and heart
Key processes in the body are controlled by the concentration of calcium in and around cells. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München have developed the first sensor molecule that is able to visualize calcium in living animals with the help of a radiation-free imaging technique known as optoacoustics. The method does not require the cells to be genetically modified and involves no radiation exposure. (2017-11-30)

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