Popular Money News and Current Events

Popular Money News and Current Events, Money News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Values and gender shape young adults' entrepreneurial and leadership
Young adults who are driven by extrinsic rewards and money and less by a sense of security are more likely to want to become entrepreneurs and leaders, according to a recent study. (2018-03-26)

Autism and theory of mind
Theory of mind, or the ability to represent other people's minds as distinct from one's own, can be difficult for people with autism. A new test provides researchers with a better understanding of the source of this difficulty. (2019-01-25)

Neural connectivity dictates altruistic behavior
A new study suggests that the specific alignment of neural networks in the brain dictates whether a person's altruism was motivated by selfish or altruistic behavior. (2016-03-03)

Attention, bosses: Why angry employees are bad for business
According to University of Arizona research, employees who are angry are more likely to engage in unethical behavior at work -- even if the source of their anger is not job-related. (2016-11-14)

New study uncovers major differences in billing complexity among US health insurers
One frequently proclaimed advantage of single-payer health care is its potential to reduce administrative costs, but new research from the Vancouver School of Economics calls that assumption into question. (2018-04-02)

Generous people give in a heartbeat -- new study
Altruistic people are said to be 'kind hearted' -- and new research published in the journal Scientific Reports shows that generous people really are more in touch with their own hearts. The study, carried out at Anglia Ruskin University and Stockholm University, is the first to find a possible physiological reason why some people are more charitable than others. (2017-11-15)

Can't buy me love: Materialism in marriage linked to devaluation of marriage
Researchers in BYU's School of Family Life have provided more insight into what may be one of the roots of the dissatisfaction caused by materialism -- a diminished view of the importance of marriage itself.  (2018-02-13)

Not feeling the music
Researchers at the University of Barcelona and the Montreal Neurological Institute and Hospital of McGill University have discovered that people with this condition showed reduced functional connectivity between cortical regions responsible for processing sound and subcortical regions related to reward. (2017-01-04)

Image conscious people are more likely to give to crowdfunding campaigns
People who are more image conscious tend to support more crowdfunding campaigns according to a new study. (2018-03-01)

Pokémon-like card game can help teach ecology: UBC research
Playing a Pokémon-like card game about ecology and biodiversity can result in broader knowledge of species and a better understanding of ecosystems than traditional teaching methods, like slideshows, according to new research from the University of British Columbia. (2019-07-17)

Trauma support for welfare recipients helps them earn more
Research shows that addressing Welfare recipients' past and current trauma help them earn more at their jobs -- providing hope for an exit from the program. (2018-01-26)

Saving money: Do consumers spend less if they think about the future?
Why is it so hard for consumers to save money? According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, consumers are often impatient and do not think about the long-term consequences of spending money. (2015-03-31)

'Muscles and money': What photos of men taken on the Tube say about modern day attraction
People still desire the traditional masculine values of muscles and money in the men they find attractive, according to new research. (2017-11-14)

Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, and politics shape public opinion
Race, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency -- specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills. (2018-06-06)

Help for shopaholics: New test determines who's at risk for compulsive buying
Compulsive shopping can lead to financial problems, family conflicts, stress, depression, and loss of self-esteem. According to a new study, there may be more people engaged in compulsive buying than previously thought. (2008-09-15)

Want a healthier population? Spend less on health care and more on social services
Increased social spending was associated with health improvements at the population level, while health spending increases did not have the same effect, according to a large new Canadian study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-01-22)

Weight-loss surgery improves lives and saves money
A new BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study indicates that weight-loss surgery is cost-effective over 10 years and can save healthcare systems money over a lifetime. (2018-04-19)

For Americans, understanding money eases old age anxiety
A new household economics study from Hiroshima University suggests that financially literate people are more capable of accumulating wealth and worrying less about life in old age. (2018-02-01)

Most parents say hands-on, intensive parenting is best
Most parents say a child-centered, time-intensive approach to parenting is the best way to raise their kids, regardless of education, income or race. (2019-01-16)

The fight against deforestation: Why are Congolese farmers clearing forest?
Only a small share of Congolese villagers is the driving force behind most of the deforestation. They're not felling trees to feed their families, but to increase their quality of life. These findings are based on fieldwork by bioscience engineer Pieter Moonen from KU Leuven (University of Leuven), Belgium. They indicate that international programmes aiming to slow down tropical deforestation are not sufficiently taking local farmers into account. (2016-10-21)

Study shows potential unintended effects of charter school movement
Increases in charter school enrollment in Pennsylvania have led to a decrease in property tax revenue in public school districts of about 9.5 percent from 2005 to 2012, according to a study led by a University of Kansas researcher. (2017-09-02)

Cash payments prompt tropical forest users to harvest less
An experiment conducted with 1,200 villagers in five developing countries found that when people are given cash to conserve, they cut down fewer trees both while they are being paid and after payments cease. (2018-03-14)

Casino lights and sounds encourage risky decision-making
The blinking lights and exciting jingles in casinos may encourage risky decision-making and potentially promote problem gambling behaviour, suggests new research from the University of British Columbia. (2018-10-29)

Sagging confidence can lead to more self-interested behaviour -- or less.
New research says that experiencing low confidence in one area can lead to attempts to boost our status in another, even if it means engaging in fraud. If we seek better financial status, we may behave more selfishly, or cheat. We may go in the opposite direction though, choosing altruism as the best way to restore our confidence. (2018-03-22)

K-State research: Freshwater pollution costs US at least $4.3 billion a year
Kansas State University researchers found that freshwater pollution by phosphorous and nitrogen costs government agencies, drinking water facilities and individual Americans costs the US at least $4.3 billion annually. (2008-11-12)

New equation reveals how other people's fortunes affect our happiness
A new equation, showing how our happiness depends not only on what happens to us but also how this compares to other people, has been developed by UCL researchers funded by Wellcome. The team developed an equation to predict happiness in 2014, highlighting the importance of expectations, and the new updated equation also takes into account other people's fortunes. (2016-06-14)

'Narco-deforestation' study links loss of Central American tropical forests to cocaine
Central American tropical forests are beginning to disappear at an alarming rate, threatening the livelihood of indigenous peoples there and endangering some of the most biologically diverse ecosystems in North America. The culprit? Cocaine. (2017-05-16)

Study: Conservation preferred way to protect drinking water
A new study from the University of Delaware found when given the choice, people prefer to invest their money in conservation, such as protecting key areas of a watershed -- also referred to as green infrastructure -- than traditional water treatment plants -- also referred to as gray infrastructure. (2016-10-28)

Advocating for social issues at work more likely to succeed linking morality and mission, study says
When convincing management to consider advocating for a particular social issue, employees may think it is wise to focus on the benefits to the bottom line but making a moral argument may be a better strategy, as long as it aligns with the company's values, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2019-02-04)

Quantum mechanics are complex enough, for now...
Physicists have searched for deviations from standard quantum mechanics, testing whether quantum mechanics requires a more complex set of mathematical rules. To do so a research team designed a new photonic experiment using exotic metamaterials, which were fabricated at the University of California Berkeley. Their experiment supports standard quantum mechanics and allows the scientists to place bounds on alternative quantum theories. The results could help to guide theoretical work in a search for a more general version of quantum mechanics. (2017-04-21)

Cost and weight-loss potential matter most to bariatric surgery patients
New study at Michigan Medicine reveals the most commonly performed bariatric surgery, sleeve gastrectomy, doesn't fit the top qualities that surveyed patients want out of their weight loss journey. (2018-11-28)

Corporate social responsibility efforts can backfire for new brands
Corporate social responsibility efforts may not always have the brand-building effects that companies want. Recent research finds a new brand can be viewed as less effective if consumers know the company donates money to good causes -- though the researchers did find ways for companies to sidestep this problem. (2018-09-05)

Why do we trust, or not trust, strangers? The answer is Pavlovian
Our trust in strangers is dependent on their resemblance to others we've previously known, finds a new study by a team of psychology researchers. (2018-01-29)

Financial therapy can aid well-being, stability
Financial therapy could help couples navigate disagreements, money concerns and financial conflicts before these issues tear relationships apart. (2019-11-21)

Industry to play critical role in funding neurosurgery research
With federal funding increasingly restricted, industry will play a critical role in funding neurosurgery research, according to a report by three prominent neurosurgeons in the journal World Neurosurgery. (2017-08-09)

Would you pay for an Ebola vaccine? Most say yes.
George Mason University researchers conducted a study during the height of the 2014-2016 Ebola epidemic and found that a majority of participants (59.7 percent) would pay at least $1 for a vaccine. (2018-03-12)

Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, & politics shape public opinion
Race, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency -- specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills. (2018-06-07)

Money really does matter in relationships
Our romantic choices are not just based on feelings and emotions, but how rich we feel compared to others, a new study published in Frontiers in Psychology has found. (2016-05-24)

Financial relationships and prescribing practices between physicians and drug companies
In a study published in The Oncologist, physicians treating certain cancers who consistently received payments from a cancer drug's manufacturer were more likely to prescribe that drug over alternative treatments. (2019-02-06)

Cutting health care costs
Health care spending among the Medicare population age 65 and older has slowed dramatically since 2005, and as much as half of that reduction can be attributed to reduced spending on cardiovascular disease, a new Harvard study has found. By 2012, those reductions saved the average person nearly $3,000 a year. Across the entire elderly population, those savings add up to a whopping $120 billion, with about half of those savings coming from Medicare. (2019-02-04)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.