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Who should be on the $10 and $20 bills? How race, gender, & politics shape public opinion
Race, gender, political affiliation, and the prejudices and biases associated with them (racism, sexism, and political ideology) seem to be at the forefront of citizen's minds when it comes to preferences for US currency -- specifically, who should be on the $10 and $20 bills. (2018-06-07)

Another victim of violence: Trust in those who mean no harm
Exposure to violence does not change the ability to learn who is likely to do harm, but it does damage the ability to place trust in 'good people,' psychologists at Yale and University of Oxford report April 26 in the journal Nature Communications (2019-04-26)

Why relationships -- not money -- are the key to improving schools
Strong relationships between teachers, parents and students at schools has more impact on improving student learning than does financial support, new research shows. The study found that social capital had a three- to five-times larger effect than financial capital on reading and math scores in Michigan schools. (2018-10-25)

New UTSA study delves into income inequality and inflation
A new study by Edgar Ghossoub, associate professor of economics at The University of Texas at San Antonio, posits that income inequality, in varying economies, can have substantial positive and negative effects for people in all walks of life depending on what kind of financial system they live under. (2017-03-06)

Money only buys happiness for a certain amount
There is an optimal point to how much money it takes to make an individual happy, and that amount varies worldwide, according to research from Purdue University. (2018-02-13)

Cutting health care costs
Health care spending among the Medicare population age 65 and older has slowed dramatically since 2005, and as much as half of that reduction can be attributed to reduced spending on cardiovascular disease, a new Harvard study has found. By 2012, those reductions saved the average person nearly $3,000 a year. Across the entire elderly population, those savings add up to a whopping $120 billion, with about half of those savings coming from Medicare. (2019-02-04)

Money really does matter in relationships
Our romantic choices are not just based on feelings and emotions, but how rich we feel compared to others, a new study published in Frontiers in Psychology has found. (2016-05-24)

Brexit fallout: An uncertain future for academic scientists
On June 23, 2016, the UK voted to leave the European Union -- and science has not been immune to its effects. The referendum has led to uncertainties in future policies and funding that could hurt the research enterprise and science-related higher education in the UK, according to an article in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (2017-11-01)

How looking at the big picture can lead to better decisions
New research suggests how distancing yourself from a decision may help you make the choice that produces the most benefit for you and others affected. (2018-07-13)

Cash programs that help the poor can harm natural resources
Poverty programs throughout the world that give poor families cash for food, education and health needs can have unintended consequences for communities that depend on natural resources, such as fish and trees. (2019-03-11)

Not all diversity is equally beneficial
Experts from the Higher School of Economics have determined that cultural diversity is beneficial for team performance in eSports, while language and experience diversity negatively affect performance. These results might be of interest to companies of similar industries aiming to maximize profits. The study, entitled 'Is Diversity Good or Bad? Evidence from eSports Teams Analysis,' was published in the journal Applied Economics. (2018-06-29)

BU study: High deductible health plans are widening racial health gaps
The growing Black Lives Matter movement has brought more attention to the myriad structures that reinforce racial inequities, in everything from policing to hiring to maternal mortality. Now, a new Boston University School of Public Health (BUSPH) study points to a previously-unidentified factor widening the racial health gap: high deductible health plans. (2020-06-24)

Mobile money improves economic well-being in Kenya
Access to digital financial services lifted 194,000 Kenyan households out of poverty, a new study estimates, and increased consumption levels, especially among female-headed households. (2016-12-08)

When new players learn slot-machine tricks, they avoid gambling addiction
Novice gamblers who watched a short video about how slot machines disguise losses as wins have a better chance of avoiding gambling problems, according to new research. (2017-10-19)

Valuing your time more than money is linked to happiness
Valuing your time more than the pursuit of money is linked to greater happiness, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. (2016-01-07)

You might be paying too much for ads on Google, Bing
New research out of Binghamton University, State University of New York suggests that instead of just spending to get that top spot, advertisers should be considering other factors as well to ensure they are getting the best results from their sponsored search advertising campaigns. (2018-02-06)

Paper: 'No money down' bankruptcies prevalent among the poor, minorities
Bankruptcy attorneys are increasingly encouraging clients to file for the more expensive 'no money down' option of Chapter 13 bankruptcy -- a tactic that's used more often with blacks than with whites, according to research co-written by Robert M. Lawless, the Max L. Rowe Professor of Law at Illinois and a leading consumer credit and bankruptcy expert. (2017-11-14)

How much people earn is associated with how they experience happiness
People who earn more money tend to experience more positive emotions focused on themselves, while people who earn less take greater pleasure in their relationships and ability to connect with others, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (2017-12-18)

Differences in social status and politics encourage paranoid thinking
Differences in social status and political belief increase paranoid interpretations of other people's actions, finds a new UCL experimental study. (2018-07-31)

When money is scarce, biased behavior happens faster
Discrimination may happen faster than the blink of an eye, especially during periods of economic scarcity, according to a new study from Cornell University. (2019-10-29)

When there's an audience, people's performance improves
Often people think performing in front of others will make them mess up, but a new study found the opposite: being watched makes people do better. (2018-04-20)

Knowing your neighbor cares about the environment encourages people to use less energy
Giving people information about how much gas or electricity their neighbors use encourages them to use less energy, research shows. (2018-09-17)

Gaming or gambling? Online transactions blur boundaries
In-game purchasing systems, such as 'loot boxes', in popular online games resemble gambling and may pose financial risks for vulnerable players, according to gambling psychology researchers at the University of Adelaide. (2018-06-28)

Tax Reform And Its Environmental Implications Investigated
National tax reform may have a substantial impact on the environment as well as on economic growth, researchers at Resources for the Future and Stanford University suggest. They have recently launched a study of the environmental implications of three alternative tax plans -- the flat tax, the national sales tax, and the unlimited savings account tax -- now under discussion in Congress (1997-01-10)

Household chores: Women still do more
Canadian women of all ages still tend to do more household chores than their male partners, no matter how much they work or earn in a job outside the home. Findings from a study in Springer's journal Sex Roles demonstrate the persistent gendered nature of how housework is divided, says lead author Rebecca Horne of the University of Alberta in Canada. (2017-09-26)

Bitcoin wallet devices vulnerable to security hacks, study shows
Devices used to manage accounts using Bitcoin could be improved to provide better protection against hackers, according to research by University of Edinburgh scientists. (2018-01-23)

Mobile coupons can increase revenue both during and after a promotion
New research from Binghamton University, State University at New York finds that mobile coupons can affect both short- and long-term sales goals, and that targeting customers with the right type of mobile coupon can boost revenue. (2018-07-16)

What if we paid countries to protect biodiversity?
Researchers from Sweden, Germany, Brazil and the USA have developed a financial mechanism to support the protection of the world's natural heritage. In a recent study, they developed three different design options for an intergovernmental biodiversity financing mechanism. Asking what would happen if money was given to countries for providing protected areas, they simulated where the money would flow, what type of incentives this would create - and how these incentives would align with international conservation goals. (2019-08-30)

For pregnancy or profit: Motive for undergoing IVF may alter the experience
A new study published in the journal Social Science and Medicine compares the physical, emotional, and cognitive experiences of women undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) either to become pregnant or to donate their eggs for money. The researchers found that there is a direct correlation between the intensity of a woman's bodily experience and her reason for harvesting eggs. (2017-08-25)

Your spending data may reveal aspects of your personality
How you spend your money can signal aspects of your personality, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Analyses of over 2 million spending records from more than 2,000 individuals indicate that when people spend money in certain categories, this can be used to infer certain personality traits, such as how materialistic they are or how much self-control they tend to have. (2019-07-17)

Want people to fund your Kickstarter project? Sell them on your reputation first
When trying to entice people to invest in your product on a crowdfunding website, potential funders are more concerned about your ethical characteristics than your actual ability to make and deliver the product, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (2018-03-28)

Which role does the brain play in prosocial behavior?
This study suggests that our tactile cortices, primarily evolved to perceive touch and pain on our body, have an important social function. They contribute to prosocial decision-making by helping to transform the sight of bodily harm into an accurate feeling for how much pain the victim experiences. This feeling is necessary to adapt our helping to the needs of others. (2018-05-25)

Doctor-affiliated PACs fund political candidates who oppose firearm safety policies
Researchers found that physician-affiliated political action committees provided more financial support to candidates who opposed increased background checks, contrary to many societies' recommendations for evidence-based policies to reduce firearm injuries. (2019-02-22)

Cutting number of cancers diagnosed as emergencies could save 1,400 lives a year
Over 1,400 lives could be saved every year -- four more every day -- if more cancers were diagnosed through GP referral instead of emergency hospital admissions, according to a new study led by City, University of London and funded by Macmillan Cancer Support. (2018-05-03)

Smoking abstinence has little impact on the motivation for food
It's sometimes thought that smokers who can't light up are likely to reach for food in lieu of cigarettes. But new research from the University at Buffalo suggests that smoking abstinence doesn't greatly affect the motivation for food. The study, published in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence, used cues and actual money to learn how much smokers might spend for cigarettes, food and water during abstinence. The results provide new insights for how different systems control motivation and reward. (2019-09-19)

Research shows benefit of giant panda conservation far exceeds cost
To determine the value of panda conservation, a research team led by Prof. WEI Fuwen from the Institute of Zoology, together with colleagues from other research organizations, cooperated to assess the value of ecosystem services from giant panda reserves for the first time. They found that the value provided by the giant pandas and forested habitat within nature reserves is about 10-27 times the conservation cost of giant pandas. (2018-06-28)

Effects of early education intervention on behavior persist for 4 decades
Adults who had received early life, intensive childhood educational intervention display high levels of fairness in social interactions more than 40 years later, even when being fair comes at a high personal cost, according to a new study by Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute scientists. (2018-11-20)

Journaling inspires altruism through an attitude of gratitude
Gratitude does more than help maintain good health. New research at the University of Oregon finds that regularly noting feelings of gratitude in a journal leads to increased altruism. (2017-12-14)

Can we put a price on healthcare innovation in cancer?
Is there evidence that the money spent on innovation 'for the cure' actually benefits cancer patients? The latest Special Issue from ecancermedicalscience tackles the overlooked topic of health economics in cancer care. (2016-10-28)

Many factors contribute to adolescents' decision-making autonomy
Decision-making within families is an important way for young people to gain independence and responsibility, and adolescence is a time of increasing autonomy. A longitudinal study by Penn State researchers in the College of Health and Human Development concludes that teens have more say in certain areas than in others, and that some teens have more autonomy than others. (2010-03-25)

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