Popular Mortality News and Current Events

Popular Mortality News and Current Events, Mortality News Articles.
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Nutritional supplements and diets not always protective, WVU research suggests
Do the nutritional supplements people take or the diets they adhere to actually protect them against cardiovascular problems and death? Maybe not, suggests a new umbrella review of meta-analyses and randomized controlled trials by Safi Khan, an assistant professor in the West Virginia University School of Medicine. (2019-07-08)

Study clusters health behavior groups to broaden public health interventions
A new study led by a University of Kansas researcher has used national health statistics and identified how to cluster seven health behavior groups based on smoking status, alcohol use, physical activity, physician visits and flu vaccination are associated with mortality. (2017-03-15)

Breast cancer statistics, 2017
Breast cancer death rates dropped 39 percent between 1989 and 2015, averting 322,600 breast cancer deaths during those 26 years. Death rates in several states are now statistically equivalent, perhaps reflecting an elimination of disparities in those states. (2017-10-03)

Simple breathing training with a physiotherapist before surgery prevents postoperative pneumonia
Pneumonia, and other serious lung complications, after major abdominal surgery were halved when patients were seen by a physiotherapist before surgery and taught breathing exercises that the patient needed to start performing immediately on waking from the operation, finds a trial published by The BMJ today. (2018-01-24)

American Cancer Society outlines blueprint for cancer control in the 21st century
The American Cancer Society is outlining its vision for cancer control in the decades ahead in a series of articles that forms the basis of a national cancer control plan. (2018-07-10)

Dietary factors associated with substantial proportion of deaths from heart disease, stroke, and disease
Nearly half of all deaths due to heart disease, stroke, and type 2 diabetes in the US in 2012 were associated with suboptimal consumption of certain dietary factors, according to a study appearing in the March 7 issue of JAMA. (2017-03-07)

Food policies could lower US cardiovascular disease rates
New research conducted by the University of Liverpool and partners shows that food policies, such as fruit and vegetable subsidies, taxes on sugar sweetened drinks, and mass media campaigns to change dietary habits, could avert hundreds of thousands of deaths from cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the United States. (2017-06-06)

Study provides insights for combating devastating amphibian disease
Amphibian chytridiomycosis, caused by infection with the Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis fungus, is the most devastating vertebrate disease on record. (2017-11-14)

In the January Health Affairs: Brazil's primary health care expansion
The January issue of Health Affairs includes a study that explores a much-discussed issue in global health: the role of governance in improving health, which is widely recognized as necessary but is difficult to tie to actual outcomes. (2017-01-09)

Pericardial window operation less efficient in cases of lung cancer than any other cancer
Pericardial window operation, a procedure, where abnormal quantity of malignant fluid, surrounding the heart, is drained into the neighbouring chest cavity, is commonly applied to patients diagnosed with cancer. Taiwanese specialists have now looked into the electronic medical records from a hospital and concluded that the treatment is not as effective in lung cancer cases when compared to any other cancer patients. Their research is published in the open access journal Research Ideas and Outcomes. (2016-04-11)

Lung cancer mortality rates among women projected to increase by over 40 percent by 2030
The global age-standardized lung cancer mortality rate among women is projected to increase by 43 percent from 2015 to 2030, according to an analysis of data from 52 countries. The global age-standardized breast cancer mortality rate is projected to decrease by 9 percent in the same time frame. (2018-08-01)

Healthcare spending in late life is not wasteful, predictive model shows
End-of-life health care spending in the United States is not wasteful, a new study says; many recipients of such expenditures aren't, in fact, certain to die, as the thinking goes. (2018-06-28)

Factors affecting the success of grizzly bear translocations
The number of grizzly bear translocations has increased in recent years to protect the bears and reduce conflicts with humans. In a recent Journal of Wildlife Management analysis of translocations in Alberta, Canada, researchers found that the most important factors for translocation success were the level of human-caused mortality risk at the release site and the time of year when the translocation occurred. (2018-01-10)

Patients with atrial fibrillation at greater risk of death in rural hospitals than urban hospitals
Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) admitted to rural hospitals in the United States have a greater chance of dying during their hospital stay than patients admitted to urban hospitals for the same condition, according to a new report in HeartRhythm. (2017-12-11)

Common pesticides kill amphibian parasites, study finds
A recent study by Jessica Hua, assistant professor of biological sciences at Binghamton University, and colleagues, explored the effects of six commonly used pesticides on two different populations of a widespread parasite of amphibians. They found that a broad range of insecticides commonly used in the US kill amphibian parasites, which could potentially decrease the number of parasites that amphibians must defend against. For the pyrethroid and neonicotinoid pesticides tested in this study, this pattern has not been documented before. (2016-04-04)

Rate of decline of cardiovascular deaths slows in US
In a study published online by JAMA Cardiology, Stephen Sidney, M.D., M.P.H., of Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, and colleagues examined recent national trends in death rates due to all cardiovascular disease (CVD), heart disease (HD), stroke, and cancer, and also evaluated the gap between mortality rates from HD and cancer. (2016-06-29)

Air pollution is associated with cancer mortality beyond lung cancer
A large scale epidemiological study associates some air pollutants with kidney, bladder and colorectal cancer death. (2017-10-31)

Cigarette price differences and infant mortality in the European Union
Higher cigarette prices were associated with reduced infant mortality in the European Union, while increased price differences between premium and budget cigarettes were associated with higher infant mortality, according to a new article published by JAMA Pediatrics. (2017-09-18)

How to attack Africa's neonatal mortality problem
Giving birth at home is the most significant risk factor for neonatal deaths in major sections of Africa -- a continent that continues to be plagued by the highest neonatal mortality rates in the world, indicates a new study by Michigan State University scholars. (2017-06-01)

Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically from one zip code to the next
Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically even across neighboring zip codes, according to a new analysis and mapping tool from researchers at The University of Texas System and UT Health Northeast. The analysis and searchable map, which are the first of their kind in Texas, use data from Texas Vital Statistics Linked Birth and Death Records from 2011-2014. (2018-01-19)

Moffitt Cancer Center awarded $3.2 million grant to study bone metastasis in prostate cancer
Moffitt researchers David Basanta, Ph.D., and Conor Lynch, Ph.D., have been awarded a U01 grant to investigate prostate cancer metastasis. Prostate cancer frequently spreads to the bone, and can cause painful bony lesion and increased mortality for patients. Their study will integrate molecular, cellular and clinical information into mathematical models to better understand key factors driving the disease to help target when metastasis may occur and identify new therapeutic targets for its prevention. (2016-07-13)

People in Canada have good health, are living longer: Global Burden of Disease Study trends
Data from the Global Burden of Disease Study shows that the overall health of Canadians is good and is consistent with other similar countries, and people are living longer with diseases, according to a study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-11-05)

Poor rural population had best diet and health in mid-Victorian years
Poor, rural societies retaining a more traditional lifestyle where high-quality foods were obtained locally enjoyed the best diet and health in mid-Victorian Britain. A new study, published in JRSM Open, examined the impact of regional diets on the health of the poor during mid-19th century Britain and compared it with mortality data over the same period. (2018-03-08)

Core outcomes established for multimorbidity research
According to a panel of international experts, clinical trials of multimorbidity should measure and report, at minimum, quality of life, mortality, and mental health outcomes. (2018-03-13)

Antibiotics may be inappropriate for uncomplicated diverticulitis
Antibiotics are advised in most guidelines on diverticulitis, which arises when one or more small pouches in the digestive tract become inflamed or infected. Results from a randomized trial question the effectiveness of this practice, however. (2016-10-04)

Screening has had 'little impact' on falling breast cancer deaths in the Netherlands
Breast screening in the Netherlands seems to have had a marginal effect on breast cancer mortality over the past 24 years, suggests research in The BMJ today. (2017-12-05)

Weight loss and risk of death: Rheumatoid arthritis findings may have wider implications
Results suggest that the findings from previous studies regarding lower weight being associated with higher mortality may not be directly related to RA and instead reflect a more generalized phenomenon. (2017-11-30)

Study compares countries' mortality rates after aneurysm surgery
There is substantial international variation in mortality rates after treatment for abdominal aortic aneurysm, or enlargement of the aorta. A BJS (British Journal of Surgery) study that compared 10-year data from England and Sweden found that mortality rates were initially better in Sweden but improved over time alongside greater use of a minimally invasive procedure called endovascular aneurysm repair in England. Now there is no difference between postoperative mortality rates after aneurysm repair in England and Sweden. (2018-02-22)

Moderate alcohol consumption in middle age can lower cardiac risk
Previous studies have pointed out the benefits of moderate alcohol consumption as a factor in lowering cardiovascular risk. In a study conducted by the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical University of South Carolina and published in the March 2008 issue of the American Journal of Medicine, researchers found that middle-aged nondrinkers who began consuming moderate amounts of alcohol saw an immediate benefit of lower cardiac disease morbidity with no change in mortality after four years. (2008-03-07)

Racial differences in link between depression and early death in kidney disease patients
In white patients with chronic kidney disease, those with depressive symptoms had a higher risk of early death than those without depressive symptoms. This risk was much lower after accounting for use of anti-depressants, however. In black patients, the presence of depressive symptoms was not linked to risk of death. Results from the study will be presented at ASN Kidney Week 2017 Oct. 31-Nov. 5 at the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center in New Orleans, La. (2017-11-04)

In the January Health Affairs: US child mortality rates worse than in other OECD nations
The January issue of Health Affairs includes a study by Ashish Thakrar of the Johns Hopkins Hospital and Health System and coauthors. The United States has poorer child health outcomes than other industrialized nations despite greater per capita spending. (2018-01-08)

Insurance linked to black-white survival disparities in colorectal cancer
Health insurance coverage differences account for nearly one-half of the black-white survival disparity in colorectal cancer patients, according to a new study. (2017-11-14)

UC researchers examine racial and gender disparities in dialysis patients
UC researchers are examining racial and gender disparities in dialysis patients as well as the impact of poor functional status and pre-dialysis hospitalizations on elderly dialysis patients. The research team presented four separate studies, all based on data from the United States Renal Data System. Three of the four studies accounted for elderly patient pre-dialysis health status, while the fourth examined racial and gender disparities and the type of vascular access in hemodialysis patients. (2017-11-03)

Higher coffee consumption associated with lower risk of death
Higher coffee consumption is associated with a lower risk of death, according to research presented today at ESC Congress.1 The observational study in nearly 20 000 participants suggests that coffee can be part of a healthy diet in healthy people. (2017-08-27)

Health chiefs failing to investigate rising deaths in England and Wales, argue experts
Health chiefs are failing to investigate a clear pattern of rising death rates and worsening health outcomes in England and Wales, argue experts in The BMJ today. (2018-03-14)

Study finds that quitting smoking during pregnancy lowers risk of preterm births
Dartmouth-led study of more than 25 million pregnant women reports on rates of smoking cessation at the start of and during pregnancy and also examines the association of quitting cigarette smoking and the risk of preterm birth. (2019-04-19)

New treatments, screening methods dramatically reduce breast cancer deaths, study finds
Six groups of researchers, including one from Stanford, collaborated to study the effect of advances in breast cancer screening and treatment on mortality rates. (2018-01-09)

Cleveland Clinic shows better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life
Cleveland Clinic researchers have found that better cardiorespiratory fitness leads to longer life, with no limit to the benefit of aerobic fitness. Researchers retrospectively studied 122,007 patients who underwent exercise treadmill testing at Cleveland Clinic between Jan. 1, 1991, and Dec. 31, 2014, to measure all-cause mortality relating to the benefits of exercise and fitness. The paper was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association Network Open. (2018-10-19)

Is back pain killing us?
Older people who suffer from back pain have a 13 per cent increased risk of dying from any cause, University of Sydney research has found. Published in the European Journal of Pain, the study of 4390 Danish twins aged more than 70 years investigated whether spinal pain increased the rate of all-cause and disease-specific cardiovascular mortality. (2017-02-23)

Want a healthier population? Spend less on health care and more on social services
Increased social spending was associated with health improvements at the population level, while health spending increases did not have the same effect, according to a large new Canadian study in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2018-01-22)

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