Popular Mothers News and Current Events

Popular Mothers News and Current Events, Mothers News Articles.
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Maternal gestational diabetes linked to diabetes in children
Children and youth of mothers who had gestational diabetes during pregnancy are at increased risk of diabetes themselves, according to new research published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal). (2019-04-15)

Are vitamin supplements used before or during pregnancy associated with risk of autism spectrum disorder?
The use of folic acid and multivitamin supplements by women before and during pregnancy was associated with a lower likelihood of autism spectrum disorder in children but this finding  needs to be interpreted with caution because other factors could explain it. (2018-01-03)

'Good bacteria' in breast milk changes over time
The cocktail of beneficial bacteria passed from mother to infant through breast milk changes significantly over time and could act like a daily booster shot for infant immunity and metabolism. The research, conducted by scientists from Montreal and Guatemala and published in Frontiers in Microbiology, has important implications for infant development and health. (2021-02-23)

Consuming sugary drinks during pregnancy may increase asthma risk in mid-childhood
Children between the ages of 7 and 9 may be at greater risk for developing asthma if they consumed high amounts of fructose in early childhood or their mothers drank a lot of sugar-sweetened beverages while pregnant, according to new research published online in the Annals of the American Thoracic Society. (2017-12-08)

Breastfeeding may protect against chronic pain after Caesarean section
Breastfeeding after a Caesarean section (C-section) may help manage pain, with mothers who breastfed their babies for at least two months after the operation three times less likely to experience persistent pain compared to those who breastfed for less than two months, according to new research being presented at this year's Euroanaesthesia Congress in Geneva (June 3-5). (2017-06-03)

Breastfeeding reduces hypertension risk
A study published in the American Journal of Hypertension indicates that women who breastfeed more children, and for longer periods of time, are less likely to suffer from hypertension after they reach menopause. This is less true of obese women, however. (2018-01-30)

Breastfed babies are less likely to have eczema as teenagers, study shows
Babies whose mothers had received support to breastfeed exclusively for a sustained period from birth have a 54 percent lower risk of eczema at the age of 16, a new study led by researchers from King's College London, Harvard University, University of Bristol and McGill University shows. (2017-11-13)

Online intervention improves depression treatment rates in teen moms
An online program persuaded teenage mothers across 10 Kentucky counties to seek medical help for depression, highlighting an inexpensive way to increase mental health treatment rates for the vulnerable group, according to a University of Louisville study. (2018-03-16)

Hydraulic fracturing negatively impacts infant health
Health risks increase for infants born to mothers living within 2 miles of a hydraulic fracturing site, according to a study published Dec. 13 in Science Advances. (2017-12-13)

Risk of autism increased in children of mothers with diabetes
The risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) was increased in children of mothers with the three main types of diabetes that complicate pregnancy, findings that add new information on type 1 diabetes and extend what is already known about type 2 and gestational diabetes. (2018-06-23)

Babies' babbling betters brains, language
Babies are adept at getting what they need -- including an education. New research shows that babies organize mothers' verbal responses, which promotes more effective language instruction, and infant babbling is the key. (2018-01-18)

Warming Arctic climate constrains life in cold-adapted mammals
A new study led by Joel Berger has uncovered previously unknown effects of rain-on-snow events, winter precipitation and ice tidal surges on the muskoxen. (2018-01-18)

Weight before pregnancy linked with children's neurodevelopment
A recent Obesity Reviews analysis of published studies found that, compared with children of normal weight mothers, children whose mothers were overweight or obese prior to pregnancy had 17% percent and 51 percent increased risks for compromised neurodevelopmental outcomes, respectively. (2017-11-22)

Maternal love: How a mother's brain responds to her infant
The distinctive ability of mothers to identify the cries of their offspring is widely evident in nature, where it is critical to the survival of these offspring. (2008-02-28)

Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may reduce fertility of daughters
Taking paracetamol during pregnancy may impair the future fertility of female offspring, according to a review published in Endocrine Connections. The article reviews three separate rodent studies that all report altered development in the reproductive systems of female offspring from mothers given paracetamol during pregnancy, which may impair their fertility in adulthood. (2018-01-05)

'Cold-blooded' pythons make for caring moms
The female Southern African python is the first ever egg-laying snake species shown to care for their babies. This comes at great cost to themselves, as they never eat during the breeding period -- with many snakes starving -- and turn their color to black in order to attract more sun while basking to raise their body temperature. (2018-03-14)

New study: Pre-pregnancy BMI directly linked to excess pregnancy weight gain
It's well known that excessive weight gain during pregnancy can have a lasting negative impact on the health of a mother and her baby. A new University of Michigan-led study finds that for young mothers (women who gave birth between the ages of 15 and 24), pre-pregnancy body mass index, or BMI, and ethnicity might signal a likelihood for obesity later in life. (2017-03-21)

Heart defects in infant may predict heart problems in birth mother later in life
Women who give birth to infants with congenital heart defects may be at increased risk of heart problems including heart attack and heart failure later in life. (2018-04-02)

45 percent of parents experience depression, anxiety and stress when newborns leave NICU
Almost half of parents whose children were admitted to Children's National Health System's neonatal intensive care unit experienced postpartum depressive symptoms, anxiety and stress when their newborns were discharged from the hospital. (2017-09-15)

Oxytocin strengthens mothers' neural responses to infant and adult faces
In a new study from the University of Tampere in Finland, nasally administered oxytocin spray strengthened brain responses to pictures of infant and adult faces in mothers of 1-year-old infants. (2018-02-26)

How to attack Africa's neonatal mortality problem
Giving birth at home is the most significant risk factor for neonatal deaths in major sections of Africa -- a continent that continues to be plagued by the highest neonatal mortality rates in the world, indicates a new study by Michigan State University scholars. (2017-06-01)

Stress main cause of smoking after childbirth
Mothers who quit smoking in pregnancy are more likely to light up again after their baby is born if they feel stressed. Researchers studied more than 1,000 new mothers and found that the stress of caring for a newborn, sleepless nights, social pressure, and the idea that they no longer need to protect the baby -- all contribute to relapse. They also found that women who felt they were being supported by a partner were less likely to start smoking again. (2015-09-09)

Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically from one zip code to the next
Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically even across neighboring zip codes, according to a new analysis and mapping tool from researchers at The University of Texas System and UT Health Northeast. The analysis and searchable map, which are the first of their kind in Texas, use data from Texas Vital Statistics Linked Birth and Death Records from 2011-2014. (2018-01-19)

How does diet during pregnancy impact allergies in offspring?
A small percentage of women said they consumed fewer allergens during pregnancy to stave off food allergies in their newborns, according to preliminary research Karen Robbins, M.D., presented during the American College of Asthma Allergy and Immunology 2018 Annual Scientific Meeting. (2018-12-14)

Safety first, children
Children are experts at getting into danger. So, how can parents help prevent the consequences? One answer, University of Iowa researchers say in a new study, is for parents to better understand how their children rate hazards and then use conversation to explain why certain situations can be dangerous. Results appear in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology. (2014-03-20)

Mother's depression might do the same to her child's IQ
Roughly one in 10 women in the United States will experience depression, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The consequences, however, may extend to their children, report researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, who found that a mother's depression can negatively affect a child's cognitive development up to the age of 16. The findings are published in the April issue of Child Development. (2018-04-17)

Improved maternity care practices decrease racial gaps in breastfeeding in the US South
A new paper published in Pediatrics links successful implementation of Baby-Friendly™ practices in the southern US with increases in breastfeeding rates and improved, evidence-based care. The changes were especially positive for African-American women. (2019-01-18)

Postpartum depression least severe form of depression in mothers
Postpartum depression -- a household term since actress Brooke Shields went public in 2005 about her struggle with it -- is indeed serious. But depression that begins before or during pregnancy is often more severe because it lasts longer and usually goes undetected until the doctor screens for it after the birth of the baby, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study. (2016-06-15)

Combating childhood obesity by preventing 'fatty liver' in fetus
New research published in The Journal of Physiology indicates that an obese pregnant mother and exposure to a high fat, high sugar diet during pregnancy produces a 'fatty liver' in the fetus, potentially predisposing children to obesity, metabolic and cardiovascular disorders later in life. (2018-03-07)

Could there be a 'social vaccine' for malaria?
Malaria is a global killer and a world health concern. But while millions of dollars are spent each year searching for innovative health solutions, new research from the University of Alberta suggests part of the answer may begin with mothers in the classroom. The research, published in the journal Pathogens and Global Health, found that maternal education can act as a 'social vaccine' for childhood malaria infection. The higher a mother's education, the lesser chance of their child being infected with malaria. (2017-05-09)

Parenting behavior in adoptive families
A new longitudinal study of adoptive families looked at whether symptoms of depression in adoptive fathers is also related to over-reactive parenting and behavior problems in children; the study also examined how social support networks affect parenting. It found that fathers' symptoms of depression were related to harsh, over-reactive parenting, but not to children's subsequent behavior problems. (2018-02-20)

Parental obesity linked to delays in child development, NIH study suggests
Children of obese parents may be at risk for developmental delays, according to a study by researchers at the National Institutes of Health. Children of obese mothers were more likely to fail tests of fine motor skill. Children of obese fathers were more likely to fail measures of social competence, and those born to extremely obese couples also were more likely to fail tests of problem solving ability. (2017-01-02)

Baby sleeping in same room associated with less sleep, unsafe sleep habits
The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends parents keep babies in the same room with them to sleep for the first year to prevent sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). But room sharing between babies and mothers beyond the first four months is associated with less sleep for babies and unsafe sleeping practices that the AAP is hoping to prevent, according to Penn State College of Medicine researchers. (2017-06-05)

Mothers living with food insecurity less likely to breastfeed exclusively to 6 months
Mothers with babies living in households with food insecurity -- inadequate or unpredictable access to food because of financial issues -- are less likely to breastfeed exclusively to the recommended six months, found a study published in CMAJ. (2018-03-19)

Physician moms are often subject to workplace discrimination
Of the nearly 6,000 physician mothers in the survey, nearly 78 percent reported discrimination of any type. Forms of perceived discrimination ranged from disrespect and reduced pay to being overlooked for promotions or being held to higher performance standards. (2017-05-08)

Mothers of children born with NAS are more likely to experience mental health problems
Women with a history of substance use disorders (SUD) have a high incidence of coexisting psychiatric and mood disorders as well as difficulty managing adversity. These characteristics may affect the ability of a pregnant woman with a history of SUD to cope with an infant with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), particularly one with a protracted neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) course, exacerbating symptoms of mental health disorders. (2018-05-05)

What causes women to stop breastfeeding early?
A recent systematic literature review has investigated potential sociodemographic, physical, mental, and social factors that may cause breastfeeding mothers to stop breastfeeding before infants reach 6 months of age. (2017-06-07)

Mothers' lack of legal knowledge linked to juvenile re-offending
Youth who commit crimes for the first time are more likely to re-offend if their mothers don't participate in their legal process, but mothers are widely unfamiliar with the juvenile justice system, finds a new study by an Michigan State University criminologist. (2017-01-05)

A mom's support helps a child learn to handle negative emotions, but what if mom is distressed?
When children become upset, showing negative emotions or behaviors, some parents become distressed, while others are able to talk their child through the difficult situation. Studies have shown that a mothers' reaction -- positive or negative -- to her child's negative emotions can predict whether her child develops the ability to effectively regulate his emotions and behavior. A new University of Illinois study explores potential predictors of mothers' supportive or non-supportive behavior during emotional challenges. (2017-11-17)

Sucking your baby's pacifier may benefit their health
Many parents probably think nothing of sucking on their baby's pacifier to clean it after it falls to the ground. Turns out, doing so may benefit their child's health. A Henry Ford Health System study found that babies whose parents sucked on their pacifier to clean it had a lower level of the antibody that is linked to the development of allergies and asthma. (2018-11-16)

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