Popular Motivation News and Current Events

Popular Motivation News and Current Events, Motivation News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 20 | 778 Results
Brain neurons help keep track of time
Turning the theory of how the human brain perceives time on its head, a novel analysis in mice reveals that dopamine neuron activity plays a key role in judgment of time, slowing down the internal clock. (2016-12-08)

Rethinking the role of technology in the classroom
Introducing tablets and laptops to the classroom has certain educational virtues, according to Annahita Ball, an assistant professor in the University at Buffalo School of Social Work, but her research suggests that tech has its limitations as well. ''You can't simply throw technology at kids and expect positive outcomes,'' says Ball, an expert in educational justice and school social work whose new study shows a decrease in academic motivation for students who participated in a technology-based intervention. (2019-10-22)

Why do we fall asleep when bored?
University of Tsukuba researcher discovers why we have the tendency to fall asleep in the absence of motivating stimuli, i.e., when bored. (2017-09-29)

Let's dance!
Research shows that dance supports wellbeing, improves group spirit, and boosts learning. The Finnish research initiative ArtsEqual has released a recommendation stating that school children should have more opportunities to engage in dance and bodily expression as part of their school curriculum. (2019-02-19)

How to deal with embarrassing situations
Feelings of embarrassment can be overcome through mental training. This is the finding of a study published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion. By training your mind to be an observer rather than actively participating in the embarrassing situation it is possible overcome humiliating or distressing feelings, says Li Jiang of Carnegie Mellon University in the US who led the study. (2018-03-27)

Too much commitment may be unhealthy for relationships, UH psychology professor says
Researchers at the University of Houston report that partners who base their self-worth solely upon the outcomes of romantic interactions may experience depression and anxiety and ultimately undermine their relationships. (2008-12-02)

Sustainability management: Legitimacy is more important than profit for large companies
The driving force behind sustainability management activities of large companies is mainly the pursuit of social acceptance. Conversely, profit maximization plays a subordinate role. (2016-02-25)

Health and spirituality values influence attendance for pelvic-floor dysfunction treatment
New research from psychologists and health professionals in Swansea has found that the types of life values that patients hold affect their attendance at medical treatment for pelvic-floor dysfunction, a condition affecting over 25 percent of all women in the UK. (2017-12-15)

Low value surgical procedures should be avoided to reduce costs and improve patient care
Reducing the use of 'low value' interventions that deliver little benefit is vital to cut healthcare costs. (2017-11-08)

Imagining a successful future can help students overcome everyday difficulties
Having a clear picture in mind of what their future will look like can motivate students to keep going despite the challenges of college life. This strategy seems to be particularly effective for female students from relatively low socioeconomic status (SES) backgrounds says Mesmin Destin of Northwestern University in the US. He is the lead author of a study in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion. (2018-01-24)

Study: Mental health mobile apps are effective self-help tools
When it comes to strengthening your mental or emotional health, would you trust an app? A trio of BYU professors has published new research that says the answers is yes. (2017-11-20)

Wearable devices and mobile health technology: one step towards better health
With increasing efforts being made to address the current global obesity epidemic, wearable devices and mobile health ('mHealth') technology have emerged as promising tools for promoting physical activity. However, current literature seems to indicate that these new technologies may serve best as part of a larger overall health plan, rather than working alone to encourage weight loss. (2018-08-13)

Motivational music increases risk-taking but does not improve sports performance
Listening to motivational music increases risk-taking behavior during sport activities and exercise -- particularly in men and when participants made their own playlist -- but does not improve performance, new research shows. (2018-01-29)

Pre-school age exercises can prevent dyslexia
A typical characteristics of children's linguistic development are early signs of the risk of developing reading and writing disabilities, or dyslexia. (2008-08-27)

Brain changes after menopause may lead to lack of physical activity
Researchers from the University of Missouri have found a connection between lack of ovarian hormones and changes in the brain's pleasure center, a hotspot in the brain that processes and reinforces messages related to reward, pleasure, activity and motivation for physical exercise. Findings suggest that activation of brain receptors in that part of the brain may serve as a future treatment to improve motivation for physical activity in postmenopausal women. (2016-07-28)

Motivation for using fake Instagram (Finsta) is not to reveal inappropriate self
As Instagram is viewed as a place for building the ideal self, some users have created fake Instagram (Finsta) accounts to buck this trend. But are these 'fake' accounts really there to express the real, sometimes ugly self, or is there a deeper motivation? A recent study by researchers at Pennsylvania State University, found that users align their real Instagram accounts (Rinsta) with their actual self and to escape from reality, whereas Finsta to foster social bonding. (2018-04-16)

Requiring physical activity classes help sedentary college students be more active
Requiring physical activity classes in college encourages sedentary students to become more active, while elective classes tend to draw those who are already motivated, new research from Oregon State University has found. (2018-09-12)

Are leaders born or made? New study shows how leadership develops
Hardly a day passes without pundits crying for leadership in the NFL commissioner and team owners, among high-ranking government officials, and in other public figures. If University of Illinois experts didn't have evidence that this valuable trait can be taught, they might join the collective swoon that's engulfing much of the country. But a new U of I study supports the idea that leaders are made, not born, and that leadership development follows a specific progression. (2014-10-06)

People will desire something even more if you increase their focus on it
The relationship between desire and attention was long thought to only work in one direction: When a person desires something, they focus their attention on it. (2017-11-13)

Childhood trauma link offers treatment hope for people with schizophrenia
Researchers from Orygen, the National Centre of Excellence for Youth Mental Health; the University of Melbourne; Port Phillip Prison and University Hospital of Gran Canaria Dr Negrin, Spain, have shown that childhood sexual, physical and emotional abuse are associated with severe hallucinations in schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders. (2018-03-12)

Study shows female managers don't mean higher pay for women
A new paper in the European Sociological Review indicates that women's and men's earnings are not affected by the share of female managers in an organization, nor by the sex of workers' individual managers. (2019-04-18)

Open relationships just as satisfying as monogamous ones, U of G study reveals
Couples in non-monogamous relationships have the same level of relationship satisfaction, psychological well-being and sexual satisfaction as those in monogamous relationships, a new University of Guelph study has found. (2018-06-28)

Health staff 'too stressed' to deal with disasters
Increasing stress and a lack of motivation among healthcare staff could result in hospitals having to shut down in the wake of a major incident such as flooding or an earthquake, according to new research published in the journal Procedia Engineering. (2018-02-26)

Lack of motivation in schizophrenia linked to brain chemical imbalance
A study of patients with psychotic illnesses such as schizophrenia suggests an alternative explanation for why many sufferers lack motivation. The research is described today BioMed Central's journal BMC Psychiatry. (2008-05-07)

Is the key to sparking climate action a game?
New research led by UMass Lowell and published by PLoS ONE found that 81 percent of participants in the World Climate Simulation, a role-playing game of the UN climate talks, showed increased motivation to combat climate change, even among Americans who are free market proponents, a belief strongly linked to denial of human-caused climate change in the United States. (2018-09-06)

Pro-environmental programs should take the factors that motivate each gender into consideration
A piece of research carried out by lecturers at the UPV/EHU's Faculty of Economics and Business has explored, from the gender perspective, the pro-environmental behavior of university students on the UPV/EHU's Bizkaia campus. The results suggest that the set of variables affecting pro-environmental behavior differs according to gender, but that the degree of intensity that each factor exerts on this behavior also differs. (2018-03-20)

Brain activity helps explain diabetics' negative feelings, risk for depression
For millions of Americans who are obese and living with diabetes or prediabetes, feelings of sadness, anger and anxiety are often part of daily life. A new Iowa State University study suggests those negative feelings may stem from problems regulating blood sugar levels that influence emotional response in the brain. (2018-05-07)

Communicating genetic disease risk has little or no impact on health related behavior
Communicating the results of DNA tests has little or no impact on behavior change, such as stopping smoking or increasing physical activity, finds a study published by The BMJ today. (2016-03-15)

Recurring nightmares could reflect your daily frustrations
People who are frustrated because their basic psychological needs for autonomy, relatedness and feeling competent are not met are more likely to have a recurring bad dream and to analyze their dreams negatively. This is according to Netta Weinstein of the University of Cardiff in the UK, who is lead author of an article on dreams published in Springer's journal Motivation and Emotion. (2017-11-30)

Study explores link between curiosity and school achievement
The more curious the child, the more likely he or she may be to perform better in school -- regardless of economic background -- suggests a new University of Michigan study. (2018-04-30)

The love lives of fruit flies
New study reveals that a male fruit fly's decision to court or ignore a female stems from the convergence of motivation, perception and chance. The triad affects the balance of excitatory versus inhibitory signals in the brain to influence decision making. Findings may yield insights about addiction disorders, depression. (2018-07-13)

'Bisexual' beetles are simply inept, new study finds
New research shows that same-sex mating among male insects is more likely to be due to incompetence rather than sexual preference. More than 100 species of insects engage in same-sex mating behavior, and in some species the same-sex mating is more common than heterosexual mating. The research team studied the red flour beetle to find out why. (2018-05-10)

Personality: Where does it come from and how does it work?
How do our personalities develop? What do we come with and what is built from our experiences? Once developed, how does personality work? These questions have been steeped in controversy for almost as long as psychology has existed. (2018-02-14)

It's about time: Immediate rewards boost workplace motivation
New research from Kaitlin Woolley shows that immediate rewards increase enjoyment and interest in tasks more compared to rewards at the end of a task. (2018-06-06)

Jounrnal of Neuroscience: Highlights from the November 9 issue
Check out these newsworthy symposia featured in the Nov. 9, 2016, issue of the Journal of Neuroscience. The symposia will be presented during Neuroscience 2016, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. Media interested in obtaining the full text of the studies should contact media@sfn.org. Media can register for Neuroscience 2016 here to access embargoed news releases and live webcasts of nine press conferences during the meeting. (2016-11-09)

Studying outdoors is better
Being taught science subjects outdoors increases student motivation. A study by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the University of Mainz therefore suggests offering more outdoor instruction at the lower secondary level. (2018-02-06)

Researchers identify brain area linked to motivational disruptions in binge eating
Scientists at Rutgers Brain Health Institute have discovered that a small group of brain cells in the hypothalamus called 'orexin' neurons could be a promising target for medications for controlling binge eating episodes in individuals with obesity. These neurons, named for the chemical messenger they use to communicate with other brain cells, have previously been shown to be important for addiction to several drugs, including cocaine. (2018-07-17)

Neuroscientific evidence that motivation promotes recovery after spinal cord injury
The research team led by Associate Professor Yukio Nishimura, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Natural Institutes of Natural Sciences, found that the nucleus accumbens, that control motivation in the brain, activates the activity of the motor cortex of the brain, and then promotes recovery of motor function during the early stage of recovery after spinal cord injury. This result is published in Science, Oct. 2, 2015. (2015-10-01)

High cognitive ability not a safeguard from conspiracies, paranormal beliefs
A University of Illinois at Chicago social psychologist reports on two studies that examined why some people are inclined to believe in various conspiracies and paranormal phenomena. (2017-11-13)

'Exam Roulette' could quell essay-induced anxiety
For many students, essay tests are a source of dread and anxiety. But for professors, these tests provide an excellent way to assess a student's depth of knowledge and critical-thinking skills. At the American Physiological Society's (APS's) Institute on Teaching and Learning in Madison, Wis., Andrew Petzold, PhD, of the University of Minnesota Rochester Center for Learning Innovation, will discuss how a game of chance can lead to increased student preparation and motivation. (2018-06-21)

Page 1 of 20 | 778 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.