Popular Multiple Sclerosis News and Current Events

Popular Multiple Sclerosis News and Current Events, Multiple Sclerosis News Articles.
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People with epilepsy: Tell us about rare risk of death
People with epilepsy want their health care providers to tell them about a rare risk of death associated with the disorder, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. (2017-02-23)

A new view of the immune system
Pathogen epitopes are fragments of bacterial or viral proteins. Nearly a third of all existing human epitopes consist of two different fragments. Known as 'spliced epitopes', these types of epitopes have long been regarded as rare. The fact that they are so highly prevalent might, among other things, explain why the immune system is so highly flexible. Results from this study have been published in the current issue of the journal Science.* (2016-10-21)

Mutation of the co-chaperone Tsc1 in bladder cancer diminishes Hsp90 acetylation and reduces drug sensitivity and selectivity
The researchers have recently identified the tumor suppressor tuberous sclerosis complex 1 as a new co-chaperone of Hsp90 that affects Hsp90 binding to its inhibitors. Their findings suggest that TSC1 status may predict response to Hsp90 inhibitors in patients with bladder cancer, and co-targeting HDACs can sensitize tumors with Tsc1 mutations to Hsp90 inhibitors. (2019-10-10)

Low muscle strength identified as early risk factor for ALS
Low muscle strength during the later teen years has been identified as a risk factor for much later onset of the neurological disease known as ALS, or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. A study at Sahlgrenska Academy published in the Journal of Neurology also links low blood counts at a young age to ALS. (2018-02-02)

Novel PET imaging agent could help guide therapy for brain diseases
Researchers have developed a new PET imaging agent that could help guide and assess treatments for people with various neurological diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and multiple sclerosis. The agent targets receptors in nerve cells in the brain that are involved in learning and memory. The study is featured in the April issue of the Journal of Nuclear Medicine. (2018-04-02)

STAT2: Much more than an antiviral protein
A protein known for guarding against viral infections leads a double life, new research shows, and can interfere with cell growth and the defense against parasites. In a new paper publishing Oct. 25 in the open-access journal PLOS Biology, Johnathan Ho and Uwe Vinkemeier at the University of Nottingham, UK, and colleagues describe the duplicitous nature of this essential protein, called STAT2, which they discovered while investigating the mechanisms behind interferon signaling. (2016-10-25)

New way to study swallowing could one day lead to improved treatments for ALS
There is no cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, but new findings from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine are deepening researchers' understanding of a common ALS symptom: swallowing problems. (2018-11-14)

Biomarkers may help better predict who will have a stroke
People with high levels of four biomarkers in the blood may be more likely to develop a stroke than people with low levels of the biomarkers, according to a study published in the Aug. 24, 2016, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2016-08-24)

Multiple sclerosis: Cholesterol crystals prevent regeneration in central nervous system
Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which the immune cells attack myelin sheaths. Regeneration of myelin sheaths is necessary for patients to recover from MS relapses. Nevertheless, the ability to regenerate decreases with age. A team from Technical University Munich has published an explanation in (2018-01-04)

Protein offers protection against nerve degeneration in ALS model
Increasing the levels of the anti-aging protein hormone Klotho improves the neurological deficits and prolongs life span in an experimental model with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In addition, brain immune cells called microglia play an important role in protecting the brain against inflammation and, likely, motor neuron loss in this model. (2019-06-27)

CRISPR helps find new genetic suspects behind ALS/FTD
NIH-funded researchers used the gene editing tool CRISPR to rapidly identify genes in the human genome that might modify the severity of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) caused by mutations in a gene called C9orf72. The results of the search uncovered a new set of genes that may hasten neuron death during the disease. (2018-03-12)

Psoriasis treated with compound derived from immune cells
A compound from the body's own immune cells can treat psoriasis in mice and holds promise for other autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, according to a new study at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (2018-04-18)

High triglycerides, other cholesterol raise risk of stroke
People with high triglycerides and another type of cholesterol tested but not usually evaluated as part of a person's risk assessment have an increased risk of a certain type of stroke, according to research published in the Dec. 26, 2007, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2007-12-26)

Statins have unexpected effect on pool of powerful brain cells
Cholesterol-lowering drugs known as statins have a profound effect on an elite group of cells known as glial progenitor cells that are important to brain health as we age, scientists have found. The new findings shed light on a long-debated potential role for statins in the area of dementia. (2008-07-03)

Drug reverses mental retardation caused by genetic disorder
A new UCLA study shows that the FDA-approved drug rapamycin reverses mental retardation in mice with a genetic disease called tuberous sclerosis complex. Because half of TSC patients also suffer from autism, the findings offer a possible mechanism for addressing learning disorders due to autism. (2008-06-22)

Preliminary study suggests drug may help babies with spinal muscular atrophy
A preliminary study suggests that an investigational drug may help increase protein levels in babies with spinal muscular atrophy. The open-label study is released today and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 70th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles, April 21-27, 2018. (2018-04-18)

U of M begins nation's first clinical trial using T-reg cells from cord blood in leukemia treatment
University of Minnesota researchers have initiated a ground breaking clinical trial to determine the optimal dose and safety of T regulatory cells (T-regs) to decrease the risk of immune reactions common in patients undergoing blood and marrow transplantation. (2007-09-05)

Good news for kids with epilepsy
There's good news for kids with epilepsy. While several new drugs have come out in the last several years for adults with epilepsy, making those drugs available for children and teenagers has been delayed due to the challenges of testing new drugs on children. But an analysis of all the research published on adults and children shows that the positive results seen in adults appear to be similar in children. (2017-02-27)

Women may be at higher risk for sports-related concussion than men
Women athletes are 50 percent more likely than male athletes to have a sports-related concussion, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 69th Annual Meeting in Boston, April 22 to 28, 2017. (2017-02-28)

Preclinical study links gene to brain aneurysm formation
University of Cincinnati neurovascular researchers have identified a gene that -- when suppressed or completely absent -- may predispose a person to brain aneurysms. Todd Abruzzo, MD, and his colleagues demonstrated that (2007-08-07)

New finding will help target MS immune response
Researchers have made another important step in the progress towards being able to block the development of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. (2015-10-29)

Harvard researchers publish MRI images of genes in action in the living brain
Biologists have just confirmed what poets have known for centuries: eyes really are windows of the soul -- or at least of the brain. In a new study published in the April 2008 print issue of the FASEB Journal, Harvard researchers describe the development of gene probe eye drops that -- for the first time -- make it possible to monitor and detect tissue repair in the brain of living organisms using MRI. (2008-03-31)

Potential new approach to the treatment of multiple sclerosis
A prospective new method of treating patients with multiple sclerosis has been proposed by researchers of the Mainz University Medical Center working in cooperation with researchers of the University of Montreal. In model trials and experiments employing human endothelial cells, they discovered that the EGFL7 protein hinders the migration of immune cells into the central nervous system by stabilizing the blood-brain barrier. (2018-03-05)

Multiple sclerosis drug could reduce painful side effects of common cancer treatment
Researchers from the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered why many multiple myeloma patients experience severe pain when treated with the anticancer drug bortezomib. The study, which will be published April 27 in the Journal of Experimental Medicine, suggests that a drug already approved to treat multiple sclerosis could mitigate this effect, allowing myeloma patients to successfully complete their treatment and relieving the pain of myeloma survivors. (2018-04-27)

Disease diagnosis in just 15 minutes
Testing for diseases such as cancer and multiple sclerosis could soon be as simple as using a pregnancy testing kit. A team led by scientists at the University of Leeds has developed a biosensor technology that uses antibodies to detect biomarkers - molecules in the human body which are often a marker for disease -- much faster than current testing methods. (2008-10-01)

Children with and without multiple sclerosis have differences in gut bacteria
In a recent study, children with multiple sclerosis had differences in the abundance of specific gut bacteria than children without the disease. Certain types of bacteria were either more or less abundant in children with multiple sclerosis. In particular, there was an association between multiple sclerosis and an increase in gut bacteria that have been linked to inflammation and a decrease in gut bacteria that are considered anti-inflammatory. (2016-05-16)

Fracking the immune system
Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center are the first to report links between early life exposure to chemicals in ground water near fracking sites and immune system imbalances in mice. Their findings suggest that exposure to these chemicals during development may adversely affect the immune system's ability to fight diseases like multiple sclerosis later in life. (2018-05-01)

Scratching the surface of mature monocytes...and coming up with CXCR7
New research published online in the Journal of Leukocyte Biology showed for the first time that mature monocytes (a specific type of white blood cell) express the CXCR7 receptor on their surface. This receptor may be a therapeutic target for controlling inflammation in the brain associated with diseases like multiple sclerosis, Parkinson's and AIDS (2017-11-03)

Efficacy of antibody targeting Devic's disease proven in new animal model
Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disease associated with NMO immunoglobulin G (NMO-IgG). A cure for NMO remains elusive. Osaka University researchers recently established a localized NMO rat model by injecting NMO-IgG into the spinal cord, and assessed the efficacy of anti-repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa) antibody in treating NMO. They found anti-RGMa antibody delayed the onset and attenuated the severity of clinical symptoms of NMO, suggesting that humanized anti-RGMa antibody is a potentially valid therapeutic approach for NMO. (2018-01-18)

Interstellar molecules inspire new transformations
When illuminating with LED light, chemists at ICIQ generated carbynes, a highly reactive chemical species that allowed them to modify drugs like anticancer paclitaxel, antidepressant duloxetine and NSAID ibuprofen. The study, led by young chemist Marcos García-Suero, just published in Nature. (2018-01-31)

New treatment lenebasum shows promise for diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc)
The results of an open label extension of a phase II study presented today at the Annual European Congress of Rheumatology (EULAR 2018) demonstrate that lenabasum continues to have acceptable safety and tolerability in diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc) with no severe or serious adverse events (AE). (2018-06-15)

New hope for multiple sclerosis sufferers
A drug which was developed in Cambridge and initially designed to treat a form of leukemia has also proven effective against combating the debilitating neurological disease multiple sclerosis. (2008-10-22)

Lab-grown human cerebellar cells yield clues to autism
Increasing evidence has linked autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with dysfunction of the brain's cerebellum, but the details have been unclear. In a new study, researchers at Boston Children's Hospital used stem cell technology to create cerebellar cells known as Purkinje cells from patients with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), a genetic syndrome that often includes ASD-like features. (2018-02-16)

New biomarkers of multiple sclerosis pathogenesis
Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic debilitating inflammatory disease targeting the brain. The pathogenesis of MS remains largely unknown. It is believed that brain tissue damage is due to immune cells targeting and breaking up the myelin basic protein (MBP), which is essential for nerve cells function. (2017-05-19)

Hundreds of thousands of genomes shed light on psychiatric disorders
A massive undertaking by the Brainstorm Consortium to analyze the genomes of nearly 900,000 people has revealed important insights into the genetic overlap among some psychiatric diseases, as well as among personality traits. (2018-06-21)

Nature of immune cells in the human brain disclosed
Researchers from the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience and Amsterdam UMC have disclosed the nature of how T cells protect the brain against harmful viruses. The results of the study, which are published in Nature Communications, are important for investigating the role of the immune system in numerous brain disorders. (2018-11-02)

PET detects neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis
The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. (2016-06-12)

Concussion may bring greater risks for athletes with ADHD
Athletes who have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be at greater risk for experiencing persistent anxiety and depression after a concussion than people who do not have ADHD, according to a preliminary study released today that will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's Sports Concussion Conference in Indianapolis, July 20-22, 2018. ADHD is a brain disorder that affects attention and behavior. (2018-07-12)

Weight loss may help prevent multiple myeloma
Carrying extra weight increases a person's risk that a benign blood disorder will develop into multiple myeloma, a blood cancer. This is particularly true for older, African-American men. (2016-11-18)

UCLA researchers report novel complementary effects of estrogen treatment in MS
A study reveals the cellular basis for how the hormone protects against damage to the central nervous system. (2017-12-28)

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