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Popular Muscle News and Current Events, Muscle News Articles.
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Mediterranean diet is linked to higher muscle mass, bone density after menopause
The heart-healthy Mediterranean diet also appears to be good for an older woman's bones and muscles, a new study of postmenopausal women in Brazil finds. The study results will be presented Monday at ENDO 2018, the Endocrine Society's 100th annual meeting in Chicago, Ill. (2018-03-18)

Strong carbon fiber artificial muscles can lift 12,600 times their own weight
Some Illinois researchers working on artificial muscles are seeing results even the fittest individuals would envy, designing muscles capable of lifting up to 12,600 times their own weight. Assistant professor of mechanical science and engineering Sameh Tawfick, Beckman postdoctoral fellow Caterina Lamuta, and Simon Messelot recently published a study on how to design super strong artificial muscles in the journal Smart Material and Structures. The new muscles are made from carbon fiber-reinforced siloxane rubber and have a coiled geometry. (2018-04-17)

Decellularized muscle grafts support skeletal muscle regeneration to treat tissue loss
A new comparative study showed the advantages of using donor decellularized muscle to promote functional tissue regeneration at the site of bulk skeletal muscle loss due to trauma or surgery. (2018-05-04)

Food for thought -- regulating energy supply to the brain during fasting
If the current financial climate has taught us anything, it's that a system where over-borrowing goes unchecked eventually ends in disaster. It turns out this rule applies as much to our bodies as it does to economics. Instead of cash, our body deals in energy borrowed from muscle and given to the brain. (2008-10-05)

Mitochondria may metabolize ADP differently in aging muscle, despite exercise resistance
Most adults reach their peak levels of muscle mass in their late 30s or early 40s. Even for those who exercise regularly, strength and function then start to decline. Those who don't can experience dramatic drops. Now, a study published March 13 in the journal Cell Reports provides new clues about the cellular mechanisms of aging muscles, highlighting the importance of how mitochondria, the powerhouses of the cell, process ADP, which provides energy to cells. (2018-03-13)

What happens to our muscles during spaceflight and when living on Mars?
The inactivity of astronauts during spaceflights presents a significant risk to their muscles, says a new study in The Journal of Physiology. Scientists have simulated the impact of 21-day spaceflights on the body, and the impact of low gravity environments such as the moon or Mars. (2018-04-17)

What's the best way to accelerate: Muscles or springs?
A new study has pinpointed principles that are common in the mechanical systems that animals, plants, fungi and machines use to maximize kinetic energy delivery. (2018-04-26)

FASEB Journal: Caloric intake and muscle mass at high altitude
New research in The FASEB Journal explored why a group of young, healthy adults residing at high altitude lost muscle mass while severely underfed and consuming the same high-protein diet that preserved muscle during weight loss at sea level. (2018-06-07)

Tamoxifen and raloxifene slow down the progression of muscular dystrophy
Steroids are currently the only available treatment to reduce the repetitive cycles of inflammation and disease progression associated with functional deterioration in patients with muscular dystrophy (MD). A study reported in The American Journal of Pathology showed that a new treatment approach using the selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) tamoxifen and raloxifene significantly improved cardiac, respiratory, and skeletal muscle functions and increased bone density in both male and female mice with the same gene defects as a subset of patients with MD. (2018-03-20)

From black hat to white hat: Findings tip assumptions about TAK1 in muscle growth
Convention was that the signaling protein, transforming growth factor-ß-activated kinase 1 (TAK1) is detrimental to muscle health since it activates pathways associated with muscle wasting. However deactivating TAK1 did not preserve muscle health as expected, but resulted in the opposite effect: muscle wasting. (2018-02-08)

Quorn protein builds muscle better than milk protein
A study from the University of Exeter has found that mycoprotein, the protein-rich food source that is unique to Quorn products, stimulates post-exercise muscle building to a greater extent than milk protein. (2019-07-03)

UBC engineers advance the capability of wearable tech
Creating the perfect wearable device to monitor muscle movement, heart rate and other tiny bio-signals without breaking the bank has inspired scientists to look for a simpler and more affordable tool. Now, a team of researchers at UBC's Okanagan campus have developed a practical way to monitor and interpret human motion, in what may be the missing piece of the puzzle when it comes to wearable technology. (2018-02-22)

Chronic inflammation plays critical role in sustained delivery of new MD therapy
Macrophages, a type of white blood cell involved in inflammation, readily take up a newly approved medication for Duchenne muscular dystrophy and promote its sustained delivery to regenerating muscle fibers long after the drug has disappeared from circulation, an experimental model study finds. (2017-10-16)

Risk factors of type 2 diabetes and CVD accumulate in children with poor aerobic fitness
Risk factors of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease accumulate in children who have poor aerobic fitness, a new study from the University of Eastern Finland shows. The study also found that the traditional way of expressing aerobic fitness in proportion to total body mass overestimates the role of aerobic fitness in identifying children at an increased risk of these diseases. (2018-11-06)

Tobacco use linked with higher use of opioids and sedatives
Tobacco is a known risk factor for the misuse of prescription opioids. In addition, concurrent use of opioids and sedative-hypnotics is a risk factor for opioid overdose or addiction. In an American Journal on Addictions study, tobacco users were more likely to receive prescriptions for opioid analgesics with muscle relaxants and/or benzodiazepines than people who did not use tobacco. (2019-01-09)

The absence of a single mitochondrial protein causes severe inflammation
Scientists at the Institute for Research in Biomedicine (IRB Barcelona) headed by Antonio Zorzano, demonstrate that the removal of a single mitochondrial protein in mouse muscle leads to severe inflammation throughout the body, causing the premature death of the animal. (2018-04-09)

Turning back the aging clock
By boosting genes that destroy defective mitochondrial DNA, researchers can slow down and potentially reverse an important part of the aging process. (2016-11-21)

Surprising roles for muscle in tissue regeneration, study finds
A team of researchers at Whitehead has illuminated an important role for different subtypes of muscle cells in orchestrating the process of tissue regeneration. Notably, in the absence of these muscles, regeneration fails to proceed. (2017-11-22)

Active young adults with Type 1 diabetes have muscle complications
A new study from McMaster and York universities in Canada has found that poor muscle health may be a complication of Type 1 diabetes, even among active twenty-somethings. (2018-04-18)

Scientists identify a key mechanism regulating a protein required for muscle and heart function
Scientists at the CNIC and Columbia University have identified a new mechanism regulating the elasticity of titin, a protein with important roles in the function of skeletal and heart muscle. (2018-01-12)

Tai Chi improves brain metabolism and muscle energetics in older adults
A new Journal of Neuroimaging study provides insights into the biochemical mechanisms by which Tai Chi -- a mind-body exercise -- may provide both physical and psychological benefits. (2018-04-19)

Military surgeons report 'alarming frequency' of bench press injuries
A new study has found that serious chest muscle injuries are occurring with 'alarming frequency' among deployed service members who lift weights. The injuries -- tears of the pectoralis major tendon -- occurred while doing bench press weight training. The injuries then required surgical repair and six months recovery. (2018-03-22)

Lower levels of microRNA 29 may protect from cardiac fibrosis rather than causing it
Cardiac fibrosis involves an increase of connective tissue in the cardiac muscle, causing a loss of function. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now discovered that fibrosis occurs less frequently when microRNA 29 (miR-29) is suppressed in cardiac muscle cells. Older studies had suggested that it was in fact low levels of miR-29 that caused fibrosis. The new insights point to potential new approaches for developing drugs against fibrotic diseases. (2017-11-22)

Researchers illustrate how muscle growth inhibitor is activated, could aid in treating ALS
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) College of Medicine are part of an international team that has identified how the inactive or latent form of GDF8, a signaling protein also known as myostatin responsible for limiting muscle, is activated. (2018-01-19)

Beating heart patch is large enough to repair the human heart
Duke University engineers have developed a 'heart patch' that is just as strong and electrically active as healthy adult cardiac tissue and large enough to cover the damage caused by most heart attacks. (2017-11-28)

'Uniquely human' muscles have been discovered in apes
Muscles believed to be unique to humans have been discovered in several ape species, challenging long-held anthropocentric theories on the origin and evolution of human soft tissues. This questions the view that certain muscles evolved to provide special adaptations for human traits, such as walking on two legs, tool use, and sophisticated vocal communication and facial expressions. The findings highlight that thorough knowledge of ape anatomy is necessary for a better understanding of human evolution. (2018-05-23)

Muscle memory discovery ends 'use it or lose it' dogma
Exercise physiologists agree: muscle memory is real. But how are these 'memories' stored? A review published in Frontiers in Physiology has a simple answer: nuclei gained during training persist even when muscle cells shrink due to disuse or start to break down. This means we can 'bank' nuclei in our youth to prevent frailty in old age -- and makes steroid use in competitive sport a perfect but irredeemable crime. (2019-01-25)

Heart derived stem cells develop into heart muscle
Dutch researchers at University Medical Center Utrecht and the Hubrecht Institute have succeeded in growing large numbers of stem cells from adult human hearts into new heart muscle cells. A breakthrough in stem cell research. Until now, it was necessary to use embryonic stem cells to make this happen. The findings are published in the latest issue of the journal Stem Cell Research. (2008-04-23)

UCLA researchers create skeletal muscle from stem cells
UCLA scientists have developed a new strategy to efficiently isolate, mature and transplant skeletal muscle cells created from human pluripotent stem cells, which can produce all cell types of the body. The findings are a major step towards developing a stem cell replacement therapy for muscle diseases including Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, which affects approximately 1 in 5,000 boys in the US and is the most common fatal childhood genetic disease. (2017-12-18)

Salk scientists find power switch for muscles
ERRγ gene enables endurance exercise and repairs type of damage seen in neuromuscular diseases. (2018-03-06)

Using whole genome analysis to home in on racing pigeon performance
A scientific team led by Malgorzata Anna Gazda and Miguel Carneiro, performed the first whole genome sequencing of 10 racing pigeons as well as data from 35 different breeds, and has now identified new clues in racing pigeons that may help enhance their performance. The study also including looking at gene expression differences (using RNA sequencing expression data) in the brains and muscle tissue of racing pigeons versus other breeds. (2018-03-13)

Enzyme LSD1 found to regulate muscle fiber type differentiation
Japanese researchers have clarified the mechanism by which the LSD1 enzyme regulates genes to determine how myoblasts differentiate into different types of muscle fibers and control their metabolic strategies. By clarifying the actions of specific enzymes and hormones, new methods for managing skeletal muscle formation, health maintenance, and changes due to aging are expected. (2018-04-11)

Gravity changes mass of muscles and bones, which was experimentally observed in space
An international collaboration led by scientists mainly at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) , Japan, has found that bone and muscle mass are regulated by the altered gravity. The experiments were done in space using Kibo, a ISS module developed by JAXA, and on the ground. (2019-07-25)

GW researcher finds genetic cause of new type of muscular dystrophy
George Washington University & St. George's University of London research, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, outlines a newly discovered genetic mutation associated with short stature, muscle weakness, intellectual disability, and cataracts, leading researchers to believe this is a new type of congenital muscular dystrophy. (2017-02-09)

Can learning stress-reducing techniques help reduce seizures?
Learning techniques to help manage stress may help people with epilepsy reduce how often they have seizures, according to a study published in the Feb. 14, 2018, online issue of Neurology®, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. (2018-02-14)

Mending broken hearts with cardiomyocyte molds
Whether caused by an undetected birth defect or by a heart attack (myocardial infarction), when a heart sustains damage, it can be difficult to repair. (2018-03-13)

Pyridostigmine treatment reverses pediatric complications of botulinum toxin therapy
In an article published online ahead of print by The Journal of Pediatrics, physicians at the Medical University of South Carolina report that complications from botox therapy for nerve disorders can be reversed with pyridostigmine, a common treatment for myasthenia gravis. The report is the first such use in pediatric patients. (2018-01-26)

Autoimmunity-associated heart dilation tied to heart-failure risk in type 1 diabetes
In people with type 1 diabetes without known cardiovascular disease, the presence of autoantibodies against heart muscle proteins was associated with cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging evidence of increased volume of the left ventricle (the heart's main pumping chamber), increased muscle mass, and reduced pumping function (ejection fraction), features that are associated with higher risk of failure in the general population (2020-04-06)

Spinal manipulation treatment for low back pain associated with modest improvement in pain, function
Among patients with acute low back pain, spinal manipulation therapy was associated with modest improvements in pain and function at up to six weeks, with temporary minor musculoskeletal harms, according to a study published by JAMA. (2017-04-11)

Mass. General study reveals how MRSA infection compromises lymphatic function
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators find that MRSA infection impairs the ability of lymphatic vessels to pump lymphatic fluid to lymph nodes in mouse models, which may contribute to the frequent recurrences of MRSA infection experienced by patients. (2018-01-17)

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