Popular Mussels News and Current Events

Popular Mussels News and Current Events, Mussels News Articles.
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A tougher tooth
Fewer trips to the dentist may be in your future, and you have mussels to thank. (2017-08-21)

Learning makes animals intelligent
The fact that animals can use tools, have self-control and certain expectations of life can be explained with the help of a new learning model for animal behavior. Researchers at Stockholm University and Brooklyn College have combined knowledge from the fields of artificial intelligence, ethology and the psychology of learning to solve several problems concerning the behavior and intelligence of animals. (2016-11-29)

Calculating the impacts of natural events on wildlife
A new method could help scientists understand how wildlife populations are affected by major natural events, such as hurricanes, severe winters, and tsunamis. (2018-03-30)

Smarter strategies
Though small and somewhat nondescript, quagga and zebra mussels pose a huge threat to local rivers, lakes and estuaries. Thanks to aggressive measures to prevent contamination, Santa Barbara County's waters have so far been clear of the invasive mollusks, but stewards of local waterways, reservoirs and water recreation areas remain vigilant to the possibility of infestation by these and other non-native organisms. (2019-12-02)

Ribbed mussels could help improve urban water quality
Ribbed mussels can remove nitrogen and other excess nutrients from an urban estuary and could help improve water quality in other urban and coastal locations, according to a study in New York City's Bronx River. The findings, published in Environmental Science and Technology, are part of long-term efforts to improve water quality in the Bronx River Estuary. (2017-11-22)

Cleaning up aquatic pollution with mussels
Scientists and activists alike have been looking for a solution to the problem of aquatic nutrient pollution. Now one group reports in Environmental Science & Technology that ribbed mussels are up to the clean-up challenge. (2017-11-08)

Global warming's next surprise: Saltier beaches
Batches of sand from a beach on the Delaware Bay are yielding insights into the powerful impact of temperature rise and evaporation along the shore that are in turn challenging long-held assumptions about what causes beach salinity to fluctuate in coastal zones that support a rich network of sea creatures and plants. (2016-08-11)

Study shows how mussels handle microplastic fiber pollution
New research shows that mussels readily take in microplastic pollution fibers from the ocean but quickly flush most of them out again, according to a study by researchers from Bigelow Laboratory for Ocean Sciences. (2018-12-04)

Substances used in household goods affect the immune system of a coastal mussel
In a study published in Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, researchers from National University of Singapore have determined how perfluoalkyl substances (PFAS) affect the immune system of green mussels. Mussels, and other invertebrates, play an essential role in their ecosystem, and the ocean is the final sink for many pollutants like PFAS, so it is important to monitor regions that may have higher environmental concentrations due to unregulated discharges of these substances. (2018-02-05)

Invasive species not best conservation tool: Study
Harnessing an invasive fish species sounded like a promising conservation tool to help reverse the destruction wreaked by zebra mussels on endangered native mollusks in the Great Lakes -- except that it won't work, says a University of Guelph ecologist. (2016-04-06)

Ocean acidification study offers warnings for marine life, habitats
Acidification of the world's oceans could drive a cascading loss of biodiversity in marine habitats, according to research published today in Nature Climate Change. The work by researchers from the University of British Columbia and colleagues in the US, Europe, Australia, Japan and China, combines dozens of existing studies to paint a more nuanced picture of ocean acidification. (2016-11-21)

Choice matters: The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood
A new study appearing online June 11 in the journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment considers which food type is more environmentally costly to produce: livestock, farmed seafood or wild-caught fish. (2018-06-11)

Species may appear deceptively resilient to climate change
Natural habitats play a vital role in helping other plants and animals resist heat stresses ramping up with climate change -- at least until the species they depend on to form those habitats become imperiled. (2017-11-22)

To build up mussels, you need to know your fish
Times are tough for 31 of Michigan's 45 varieties of freshwater mussels. Sporting evocative names like wavy-rayed lampmussel and round pigtoe, these residents of the state's rivers are imperiled by habitat disruption and pollution and are also threatened by climate change. Michigan State University scientists' recommendation to figure out the best places to focus conservation efforts: Worry about fish. (2018-02-27)

Strong hosts help parasites spread farther
Large, physically strong Masu salmon disperse farther when infected with parasites, potentially escaping from further infections at the contaminated site but ironically resulting in the greater expansion of the parasite, according to Hokkaido University researchers. (2017-11-22)

Four kinds of algal toxins found in San Francisco Bay shellfish
Researchers monitoring San Francisco Bay for algal toxins have found a surprising array of different toxins in the water and in mussels collected from the bay. Four different classes of toxins, including one produced in freshwater environments, occur regularly throughout the bay, according to a study led by UC Santa Cruz researchers. (2018-03-12)

Acidification of the sea hampers reproduction of marine species
Within 100 years, it is reckoned that the world's seas will be three times as acidic as they are now. The lower pH may strike a severe blow to the ability of marine species to reproduce, according to research on sea urchins at the University of Gothenburg. (2008-07-29)

Munitions at the bottom of the Baltic Sea
The bottom of the Baltic Sea is home to large quantities of sunken munitions, a legacy of the Second World War -- and often very close to shore. Should we simply leave them where they are and accept the risk of their slowly releasing toxic substances, or should we instead remove them, and run the risk of their falling apart -- or even exploding? (2019-02-08)

Dallas researchers study Texas' first federally endangered mussel species
A team of Texas A&M AgriLife scientists led by Dr. Charles Randklev in Dallas works alongside collaborators to understand the ecology and taxonomy of Texas' first federally endangered mussel species. (2018-02-16)

Is there a risk to human health from microplastics?
The Austrian Federal Environment Agency and the Medical University of Vienna have presented the first preliminary results of a pilot study on microplastics (microplastic particles) in humans. They have detected microplastic particles in stool of eight volunteers. The German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR) summarizes its findings on possible health risks of microplastic particles for humans. (2018-10-31)

Ocean acidification means major changes for California mussels, FSU researcher says
Accelerating ocean acidification could be transforming the fundamental structure of California mussel shells, according to a new report from a Florida State University-led team of scientists. (2018-01-05)

Cooking chemistry minus heat equals new non-toxic adhesive
A new soy-based, non-toxic adhesive could be used in organic food packaging and some speciality food items. (2019-01-31)

Round Goby invade Great Lakes
A team of scientists from the University of Toronto, the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and the University of Guelph has identified a drastic invasion of round goby into many Great Lakes tributaries, including several areas of the Thames, Sydenham, Ausable and Grand Rivers. A number of the affected areas are known as (2009-08-11)

USGS news: Changing tides: Lake Michigan could best support lake trout and steelhead
Invasive mussels and less nutrients from tributaries have altered the Lake Michigan ecosystem, making it more conducive to the stocking of lake trout and steelhead than Chinook salmon, according to a recent US Geological Survey and Michigan State University study. (2017-08-16)

Global warming has uneven effect on coastal animals
Although it is expected that populations of many organisms will move away from the equator and toward the poles to stay cool during global warming, researchers have found that the intertidal zone does not exactly fit this pattern. A study published in this week's Science Magazine indicates that there may be (2002-10-31)

Lubricant-infused material is a slick trick against mussels
A lubricant-infused polymer could reduce the problem of fouling, in which mussels, barnacles and other organisms encrust themselves to ship hulls and marine pipes. (2017-08-17)

FEFU scientist reported on concentration of pesticides in marine organisms
According to ecotoxicologist from Far Eastern Federal University (FEFU), from the 90s and during 2000s in the tissues of Russian Far Eastern mussels the concentration of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) that had been globally used in agriculture in the mid-twentieth century has increased about ten times. OCPs pollute and affect badly the ecosystems of the Sea of Japan, the Sea of Okhotsk, and the Bering Sea. A related review was published in Water Research. (2019-06-19)

Gene chips forecast ecological impacts of climate change
The AAAS conference topic is (2007-02-18)

Study identifies biomedical potential of bivalves
Shellfish like oysters and mussels have the potential to revolutionize human health research, according to a new paper in Developmental and Comparative Immunology. The study reveals how using bivalves as model organisms offers numerous promising avenues for medical research -- from pharmaceutical development to bone regeneration. (2019-01-29)

Ocean acidification affects mussels at early life stages
Mussels protect themselves against environmental disturbances and enemies through a hard, calcareous shell. Increased ocean acidification makes it difficult for organisms to form their shells. In a study published today, in the international journal, Nature Communications, a group of scientists from the Kiel University and GEOMAR Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel show that mussel larvae react sensitively to ocean acidification, which leads to reduced calcification rates and shell dissolution. (2017-11-22)

Marine vegetation can mitigate ocean acidification, UCI study finds
Marine plants and seaweeds in shallow coastal ecosystems can play a key role in alleviating the effects of ocean acidification, and their robust population in shoreline environments could help preserve declining shellfish life, according to a study by University of California, Irvine ecologists. (2018-01-22)

Looking beyond conventional networks can lead to better predictions
New research from a team of University of Notre Dame researchers led by Nitesh Chawla, Frank M. Freimann Professor of Computer Science and Engineering and Director of the Interdisciplinary Center for Network Science and Applications (iCeNSA), suggests that current algorithms to represent networks have not truly considered the complex inter-dependencies in data, which can lead to erroneous analysis or predictions. Chawla's team has developed a new algorithm that offers the promise of more precise network representation and accurate analysis. (2016-05-20)

Slippery liquid surfaces confuse mussels
Mussels are one of the worst perpetrators of biofouling, or the unwanted accumulation of organisms on underwater structures. A team of scientists from the Wyss Institute and NTU, Singapore has demonstrated that a lubricant-infused surface effectively prevents mussels from sticking by masking the solid surface with a layer of liquid. (2017-08-17)

Monitoring Of DNA Strand Breakage In Freshwater Mussels Offers A New Way To Detect Pollution, University of Georgia Study Says
Scientists have known for several decades that bivalves such as freshwater mussels readily accumulate many classes of environmental pollutants. A study by environmental toxicologists at the University of Georgia reports that a new method of studying theDNA of freshwater mussels could make them an even more effective tool in limiting the effects of pollution (1996-12-11)

HKBU study: Sunscreen chemicals harm fish embryos and could pose risk to humans
A HKBU has detected an extensive amount of sunscreen chemicals in seawater that could pose a risk to human health. (2018-10-04)

Living laboratory found on shoreline statues
Liverpool scientists have discovered an unlikely habitat on a Merseyside beach that has provided a new home for marine life. (2006-10-20)

First-time observation of genetic/physiological damage caused by nanoplastics in mussels
Researchers at the UAB, in collaboration with the University of Aveiro, Portugal, were able to confirm for the first time that small concentrations of nanoplastics cause genetic and physiological damage in the Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. The research was recently published in Science of the Total Environment. (2018-07-25)

How ancient Mayan shell decor led to a new look at freshwater mussels south of the border
An unlikely collaboration between archaeologists desperate to put names to shells at Mayan dig sites and an ichthyologist led to the first molecular study of Mexican and Central American freshwater mussels. (2018-11-26)

Mussel-inspired glue could one day make fetal surgery safer
Whether to perform surgery on a fetus is a heart-wrenching decision. This type of surgery involves penetrating the delicate amniotic sac, increasing health risks to the fetus. Now researchers report the development of a glue, inspired by the tenacious grip of mussels on slippery rocks, that could one day help save the lives of the youngest patients. The researchers present their findings today at the 254th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society. (2017-08-20)

Newcomers play cryptic
Invasive species can put native animal and plant species on the brink of extinction. They often go undetected for a long time, or their damaging impacts are not immediately clear. This phenomenon - referred to as crypticity - represents a huge challenge for the management of species communities and the conservation of biodiversity. This is the conclusion of an international team of researchers. (2019-01-24)

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