Popular Nanoparticles News and Current Events

Popular Nanoparticles News and Current Events, Nanoparticles News Articles.
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World's fastest hydrogen sensor could pave the way for clean hydrogen energy
Hydrogen is a clean and renewable energy carrier that can power vehicles, with water as the only emission. Unfortunately, hydrogen gas is highly flammable when mixed with air, so very efficient and effective sensors are needed. Now, researchers from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, present the first hydrogen sensors ever to meet the future performance targets for use in hydrogen powered vehicles. (2019-04-11)

Enhanced glow
Tumor cells circulating in blood are markers for the early detection and prognosis of cancer. However, detection of these cells is challenging because of their scarcity. In the journal Angewandte Chemie, scientists have now introduced an ultrasensitive method for the direct detection of circulating tumor cells in blood samples. It is based on the amplified, time-resolved fluorescence measurement of luminescent lanthanide ions released from nanoparticles that bind specifically to tumor cells. (2019-08-07)

Huntington's disease provides new cancer weapon
Patients with Huntington's disease, a fatal genetic illness that causes the breakdown of nerve cells in the brain, have up to 80 percent less cancer than the general population. Scientists have discovered why Huntington's is so toxic to cancer cells and harnessed it for a novel approach to treat cancer, a new study reports. (2018-02-12)

'Workhorse' lithium battery could be more powerful thanks to new design
Cornell University chemical engineering professor Lynden Archer believes there needs to be a battery technology 'revolution' -- and thinks that his lab has fired one of the first shots. (2018-06-25)

Light touch keeps a grip on delicate nanoparticles
Using a refined technique for trapping and manipulating nanoparticles, NIST researchers have extended the trapped particles' useful life more than tenfold. This new approach, which one researcher likens to (2012-05-03)

New technique produces tunable, nanoporous materials
A collaborative group of researchers describe a new technique for creating novel nanoporous materials with unique properties that can be used to filter molecules or light. (2017-10-26)

Multiresponsive nanosurfactant constructs tiny chemical factory
IBS scientists have made a surfactant based on nanoparticle dimers, which is responsive to multiple stimuli. The nanosurfactant combines several characteristics of each 'active' molecular surfactant which allows a tremendous flexibility whereby liquid droplets can be manipulated. (2018-01-10)

Nanoparticles deliver anticancer cluster bombs
Scientists have devised a triple-stage 'cluster bomb' system for delivering the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, via tiny nanoparticles designed to break up when they reach a tumor. (2016-03-29)

Glioblastoma nanomedicine crosses into brain in mice, eradicates recurring brain cancer
A new synthetic protein nanoparticle capable of slipping past the nearly impermeable blood-brain barrier in mice could deliver cancer-killing drugs directly to malignant brain tumors, new research from the University of Michigan shows. (2020-11-10)

Nanoparticles remain unpredictable
The way that nanoparticles behave in the environment is extremely complex. There is currently a lack of systematic experimental data to help understand them comprehensively, as ETH environmental scientists have shown in a large overview study. A more standardized approach would help to advance the research field. (2017-04-19)

A mechanical way to stimulate neurons
Magnetic nanodiscs can be activated by an external magnetic field, providing a research tool for studying neural responses. (2020-07-20)

Highly efficient photocatalyst capable of carbon dioxide recycling
A research team from Korea has developed titanium dioxide-based photocatalyst with the highest efficiency in the world that converts carbon dioxide into methane. The result is expected to be applied to technologies to reduce and reuse carbon dioxide. (2017-12-01)

Researchers develop breakthrough technique to combat cancer drug resistance
The ability for cancer cells to develop resistance to chemotherapy drugs -- known as multi-drug resistance -- remains a leading cause for tumor recurrence and cancer metastasis, but recent findings offer hope that oncologists could one day direct cancer cells to 'turn off' their resistance capabilities. (2018-02-08)

Obtaining of silicon nanowires becomes eco-friendly
Scientists from the Faculty of Physics, the Lomonosov Moscow State University have devised a technique of silicon nanowires synthesis. They have managed to do this with the help of metal-assisted etching, where safer and more eco-friendly ammonium fluoride is used instead of hydrofluoric acid. The research results have been published in Nanoscale Research Letters journal. (2016-10-18)

Deep-brain exploration with nanomaterial
Studying deep brain tissues noninvasively is difficult. Now RIKEN scientists in Japan have developed a way to send light deep into the brain without invasive optical fibers. The method uses infrared light outside the head to activate upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs). When these nanoparticles absorb near-infrared laser light, they emit visible photons to deep areas in the brain, allowing remote optogenetic stimulation or inhibition of neurons in the brain. (2018-02-08)

Lipid nanoparticles for gene therapy
Twenty-five years have passed since the publication of the first work on solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) and nanostructured lipid carriers (NLCs) as a system for delivering drugs. So the European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics has prepared a special edition for which it asked the PharmaNanoGene group of the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country to produce a piece of work. (2017-02-14)

Better cathode materials for lithium-sulphur-batteries
A team at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) has for the first time fabricated a nanomaterial made from nanoparticles of a titanium oxide compound (Ti4O7) that is characterized by an extremely large surface area, and tested it as a cathode material in lithium-sulphur batteries. The highly porous nanomaterial possesses high storage capacity that remains nearly constant over many charging cycles. (2017-05-17)

Too much technology may be killing beneficial bacteria
For years, scientists have known about silver's ability to kill harmful bacteria. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found that silver nanoparticles also may destroy benign bacteria that are used to remove ammonia from wastewater treatment systems. The study was funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. (2008-04-29)

A versatile method to pattern functionalized nanowires
A team of researchers from Hokkaido University has developed a versatile method to pattern the structure of 'nanowires,' providing a new tool for the development of novel nanodevices. (2016-09-09)

3-D nanoscale imaging made possible
In a research article '3D Nano-scale Imaging by Plasmonic Brownian Microscopy' published today in Nanophotonics, the team around Prof. Xiang Zhang from the University of California in Berkeley demonstrate a method for meeting this challenge with stunning properties. (2017-12-15)

Nanoparticles can grow in cubic shape
Use of nanoparticles in many applications, e.g. for catalysis, relies on the surface area of the particles. Now scientists show how originally spherical nucleus can transform into cube with high surface-to-volume ratio. These nanocubes are available to be used in practice, and may interest many designers of new materials. The research has recently been reported in ACS Nano. (2016-04-04)

An ionic forcefield for nanoparticles
Nanoparticles are promising drug delivery tools but they struggle to get past the immune system's first line of defense: proteins in the blood serum that tag potential invaders. Now, Harvard researchers have developed an ionic forcefield that prevents proteins from binding to and tagging nanoparticles. In mouse experiments, nanoparticles coated with the ionic liquid survived significantly longer in the body than uncoated particles. (2020-11-25)

Water, water -- the two types of liquid water
There are two types of liquid water, according to research carried out by an international scientific collaboration. This new peculiarity adds to the growing list of strange phenomena in what we imagine is a simple substance. The discovery could have implications for making and using nanoparticles as well as in understanding how proteins fold into their working shape in the body or misfold to cause diseases such as Alzheimer's or CJD. (2016-11-10)

Radiation therapy, macrophages improve efficacy of nanoparticle-delivered cancer therapy
Massachusetts General Hospital investigators report finding finding how appropriately timed radiation therapy can significantly improve the delivery of cancer nanomedicines by attracting macrophages to tumor blood vessels, which results in a transient 'burst' of nanoencapsulated drugs from capillaries into the tumor. (2017-05-31)

Bacterial outer membrane vesicles: An emerging tool in vaccine development
Outer membrane vesicles, biological nanoparticles shed during normal growth by bacteria, have seen significant recent advances in engineering and are thus finding new utility as therapeutic and drug delivery agents. One specific research focus explored recently in the literature is the use of bacterial vesicles as adjuvants in vaccine formulations. (2017-09-26)

Are nanobots on their way?
The first real steps towards building a microscopic device that can construct nano machines have been taken by US researchers. Writing in the peer-reviewed publication, International Journal of Nanomanufacturing from Inderscience Publishers, researchers describe an early prototype for a nanoassembler. (2008-04-28)

New dental imaging method uses squid ink to fish for gum disease
Squid ink could one day make getting checked for gum disease at the dentist less tedious and even painless. By combining squid ink with light and ultrasound, a team led by engineers at the University of California San Diego has developed a new dental imaging method to examine a patient's gums that is noninvasive, more comprehensive and more accurate than the state of the art. (2017-09-07)

Heads in the cloud: Scientists predict internet of thoughts 'within decades'
An international collaboration led by researchers at UC Berkeley and the US Institute for Molecular Manufacturing predicts that exponential progress in nanotechnology, nanomedicine, AI, and computation will lead this century to the development of a ''Human Brain/Cloud Interface'' (B/CI), that connects neurons and synapses in the brain to vast cloud-computing networks in real time. (2019-04-12)

The path length of light in opaque media
A transparent substance will allow the light to travel through on a straight line, in a turbid substance the light will be scattered numerous times, travelling on more complicated zig-zag trajectories. But astonishingly, the average total distance covered by the light inside the substance is always the same. (2017-11-10)

The research of Samara scientists will help to explain how building material for planets appears in the universe
The research of samara scientists will help to explain how building material for planets appears in the universe. (2019-04-09)

Nanoparticle vaccine offers universal protection against influenza a viruses, study finds
Researchers have developed a universal vaccine to combat influenza A viruses that produces long-lasting immunity in mice and protects them against the limitations of seasonal flu vaccines, according to a study led by Georgia State University. (2018-01-24)

Paper-based tuberculosis test could boost diagnoses in developing countries
Diagnosing tuberculosis early can allow patients to receive the medicine they need and also help prevent the disease from spreading. But in resource-limited areas, equipment requirements and long wait times for results are obstacles to diagnosis and treatment. To tackle this problem, scientists report in ACS Sensors the development of a fast, paper-based tuberculosis test that can be read with a smartphone. (2017-09-13)

New malleable 'electronic skin' self-healable, recyclable
University of Colorado Boulder researchers have developed a new type of malleable, self-healing and fully recyclable 'electronic skin' that has applications ranging from robotics and prosthetic development to better biomedical devices. (2018-02-09)

Creating higher energy density lithium-ion batteries for renewable energy applications
Lithium-ion batteries that function as high-performance power sources for renewable applications, such as electric vehicles and consumer electronics, require electrodes that deliver high energy density without compromising cell lifetimes. In the Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A, researchers investigate the origins of degradation in high energy density LIB cathode materials and develop strategies for mitigating those degradation mechanisms and improving LIB performance. (2020-11-24)

Making batteries from waste glass bottles
Researchers at the University of California, Riverside's Bourns College of Engineering have used waste glass bottles and a low-cost chemical process to create nanosilicon anodes for high-performance lithium-ion batteries. The batteries will extend the range of electric vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles, and provide more power with fewer charges to personal electronics like cell phones and laptops. (2017-04-19)

Nanoparticles hitchhiking their way along strands of hair
In shampoo ads, hair always looks like a shiny, smooth surface. But for physicists peering into microscopes, the hair surface looks much more rugged, as it is made of saw-tooth, ratchet-like scales. In a new theoretical study published in EPJ E, Matthias Radtke and Roland Netz have demonstrated that massaging hair can help to apply drug treatment -- encapsulated in nanoparticles trapped in the channels formed around individual hairs -- to the hair roots. (2017-01-27)

Radiation-guided nanoparticles zero in on metastatic cancer
Zap a tumor with radiation to trigger expression of a molecule, then attack that molecule with a drug-loaded nanoparticle. (2016-06-29)

Scientists capture colliding organic nanoparticles on video for first time
A Northwestern University research team is the first to capture on video organic nanoparticles colliding and fusing together. This unprecedented view of 'chemistry in motion' will aid Northwestern nanoscientists developing new drug delivery methods as well as demonstrate to researchers around the globe how an emerging imaging technique opens a new window on a very tiny world. (2017-11-17)

Nanoparticles can limit inflammation by distracting the immune system
A surprise finding suggests that an injection of nanoparticles may be able to help fight the immune system when it goes haywire, researchers at the University of Michigan have shown. The nanoparticles divert immune cells that cause inflammation away from an injury site. (2017-11-08)

Better contrast agents based on nanoparticles
Scientists at the University of Basel have developed nanoparticles which can serve as efficient contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging. This new type of nanoparticles produce around ten times more contrast than the actual contrast agents and are responsive to specific environments. The journal Chemical Communications has published these results. (2016-08-03)

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