Popular Nanoscale News and Current Events | Page 2

Popular Nanoscale News and Current Events, Nanoscale News Articles.
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Hiring antibodies as nanotechnology builders
Researchers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata recruit antibodies as molecular builders to assemble nanoscale structures made of synthetic DNA. (2019-12-03)

New imaging technique peers inside living cells
Called Ultrasound Bioprobe, the non-invasive approach developed at Northwestern University allows researchers to view sub-cellular structures and their mechanical behavior at nanoscale resolution. (2017-11-16)

Atomic force imaging used to study nematodes
In a new study, researchers report for the first time the effective imaging of the nanoscale structure of C. elegans nematodes' cuticle using atomic force microscopy operating in PeakForce Tapping mode. (2017-02-17)

Scientists unlock path to use cell's own nanoparticles as disease biomarkers
Developing a method to identify individual cell messengers, called extracellular vesicles, means they can now be used to detect cancer and other disease and be engineered for regenerative medicine. (2018-04-12)

Carrying and releasing nanoscale cargo with 'nanowrappers'
Scientists made hollow nanosized boxes with corner holes, demonstrating how these ''nanowrappers'' can carry and release DNA-coated nanoparticles. (2019-01-03)

Imaging individual flexible DNA 'building blocks' in 3-D
A team of researchers from Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (Berkeley Lab) and Ohio State University have generated 3-D images from 129 individual molecules of flexible DNA origami particles. Their work provides the first experimental verification of the theoretical model of DNA origami. (2018-02-22)

Flexible ceramic material is a 'plumber's nightmare'
Using nanoscale chemistry, researchers at Cornell University have developed a new class of hybrid materials that they describe as flexible ceramics, with a structure so convoluted it has been dubbed (2002-03-19)

Metalens grows up
Researchers have developed an all-glass, centimeter-scale metalens in the visible spectrum that can be manufactured using conventional chip fabrication methods (2019-12-03)

Systems analysis -- from the nanoscale to the global
Two major research grants were announced today by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. One will push the frontiers of systems research to understand how best to plan, design and invest in modern, sustainable and resilient infrastructure services. The other will aim to gain previously unachieved design capabilities through modeling flow dynamics at the nanoscale. (2016-02-26)

Collagen nanofibrils in mammalian tissues get stronger with exercise
A recent experimental study conducted by researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Washington University in St. Louis, and Columbia University on nanoscale collagen fibrils reported on, previously unforeseen, reasons why collagen is such a resilient material. (2018-12-13)

MIPT scientists revisit optical constants of ultrathin gold films
The authors of the paper provide reference data on the optical constants of gold for a wide range of wavelengths for films that are 20 to 200 nanometers thick. These findings will be of use to researchers working on various nanophotonic devices and metamaterials. (2017-10-17)

Cells 'walk' on liquids a bit like geckos
Researchers at Queen Mary University of London have discovered that cells can 'walk' on liquids a bit like the way geckos stick to other surfaces. (2018-02-14)

The carpenter enzyme gives DNA the snip
Enzyme follows a two-step verification system before cutting and repairing DNA damage. (2017-04-02)

This drug could block harmful impact of teen binge drinking
Alcohol-fueled parties might be seen as a rite of passage for many high school students, but they have an unexpected impact: binge-drinking behavior as teenagers can lead to problems with alcohol and other drug dependence later on in life. (2017-11-02)

Carbon nanotubes devices may have a limit to how 'nano' they can be
Carbon nanotubes bound for electronics not only need to be as clean as possible to maximize their utility in next-generation nanoscale devices, but contact effects may limit how small a nano device can be, according to researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University in collaboration with researchers at Rice University. (2018-01-03)

Quantum sensors providing magnetic resonance with unprecedented sensitivity
A piece of work involving international collaboration and the participation of the Quantum Technologies for Information Science (QUTIS) group of the UPV/EHU's Department of Physical Chemistry, has produced a series of protocols for quantum sensors that could allow images to be obtained by means of the nuclear magnetic resonance of single biomolecules using a minimal amount of radiation. The results of the research have been published in the prestigious interdisciplinary physics journal Physical Review Letters. (2019-01-31)

Researchers use acoustic waves to move fluids at the nanoscale
A team of mechanical engineers at the University of California San Diego has successfully used acoustic waves to move fluids through small channels at the nanoscale. The breakthrough is a first step toward the manufacturing of small, portable devices that could be used for drug discovery and microrobotics applications. The devices could be integrated in a lab on a chip to sort cells, move liquids, manipulate particles and sense other biological components. (2016-11-14)

Mapping nanoscale chemical reactions inside batteries in 3-D
Researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have developed a new technique that lets them pinpoint the location of chemical reactions happening inside lithium-ion batteries in three dimensions at the nanoscale level. (2018-03-02)

Rethinking the science of plastic recycling
A multi-institutional collaboration reports a catalytic method for selectively converting discarded plastics into higher quality products. The team included Argonne National Laboratory, Ames Laboratory, Northwestern University and three other universities. (2019-10-23)

New hybrid nanostructures detect nanoscale magnetism
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a new process for growing a single multi-walled carbon nanotube that is embedded with cobalt nanostructures. Using this new hybrid material, the team determined that the electrical conductance of MWCNTs is sensitive enough to detect and be affected by trace amounts of magnetic activity. It is believed to be the first instance of demonstrating the detection of magnetic fields of such small magnets using an individual carbon nanotube. (2008-12-08)

Controlling the nanoscale structure of membranes is key for clean water, researchers find
A desalination membrane acts as a filter for salty water: push the water through the membrane, get clean water suitable for agriculture, energy production and even drinking. The process seems simple enough, but it contains complex intricacies that have baffled scientists for decades -- until now. Researchers from Penn State, The University of Texas at Austin, Iowa State University, Dow Chemical Company and DuPont Water Solutions published a key finding in understanding how membranes actually filter minerals from water, online today (Dec. 31) in Science. (2020-12-31)

Researchers develop nanoscale fibers that are thinner than the wavelengths of light they carry
Researchers have developed a process to create wires only 50 nanometers (billionths of a meter) thick. Made from silica, the same mineral found in quartz, the wires carry light in an unusual way. Because the wires are thinner than the wavelengths of light they transport, the material serves as a guide around which light waves flow. (2003-12-17)

Aerosol-assisted biosynthesis strategy enables functional bulk nanocomposites
researchers led by Professor YU Shu-Hong from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) developed a general and scalable biosynthesis strategy, which involves simultaneous growth of cellulose nanofibrils through microbial fermentation and co-deposition of various kinds of nanoscale building blocks (NBBs) through aerosol feeding (intermittent spray of liquid nutrients and NBBs suspension) on solid culture substrates. (2019-01-28)

Giving nanowires a DNA-like twist
Argonne National Laboratory played a critical role in the discovery of a DNA-like twisted crystal structure created with a germanium sulfide nanowire, also known as a 'van der Waals material.' Researchers can tailor these nanowires in many different ways -- twist periods from two to twenty micrometers, lengths up to hundreds of micrometers, and radial dimensions from several hundred nanometers to about ten micrometers. By this means, they can adjust the electrical and optical properties to optimize performance for different applications. (2019-07-10)

Revealing the ion transport at nanoscale
EPFL researchers have shown that a law of physics having to do with electron transport at nanoscale can also be analogously applied to the ion transport. This discovery provides insight into a key aspect of how ion channels function within our living cells. (2016-03-29)

Designing a better superconductor with geometric frustration
Study shows a magnet-controlled 'switch' in superconductor configuration provides unprecedented flexibility in managing the location of vortex filaments, altering the properties of the superconductor. (2018-06-11)

Phononic SEIRA -- enhancing light-molecule interactions via crystal lattice vibrations
Researchers from CIC-nanoGUNE (San Sebastián, Spain), in collaboration with the Donostia International Physics Center (San Sebastián, Spain), Materials Physics Center (CFM, CSIC-UPV/EHU, San Sebastián, Spain) and University of Oviedo demonstrate a new way to strongly couple infrared light and molecular vibrations, by utilizing phonon polariton nanoresonators made of hexagonal boron nitride, a Van der Waals material. (2018-04-09)

New method opens the way for cutting tools with longer lifetime
Researchers at Linköping University have developed a theoretical model that enables simulations for showing what happens in hard cutting materials as they degrade. The model will enable manufacturing industry to save both time and money. (2019-03-08)

Study yields a new scale of earthquake understanding
Nanoscale knowledge of the relationships between water, friction and mineral chemistry could lead to a better understanding of earthquake dynamics, researchers said in a new study. Engineers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign used microscopic friction measurements to confirm that, under the right conditions, some rocks can dissolve and may cause faults to slip. (2018-06-27)

Nagoya-led team flips the switch on ferroelectrics
Nagoya University-led team controls the configuration of domains in nanorod- and thin-film ferroelectric systems. (2017-08-28)

Photopolymerization-triggered molecular motion for flexible liquid crystal display
Scientists at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) and McGill University have developed a new dye-free photoalignment method that enables 2-D patterns of liquid crystals in one step by guiding nonpolarized light temporally and spatially on the photopolymerization process. This new method provides a pathway for the simple creation of highly functional organic materials such as flexible liquid crystal devices. (2017-11-13)

New tool allows scientists to visualize 'nanoscale' processes
Chemists at UC San Diego have developed a new tool that allows scientists for the first time to see, at the scale of five billionths of a meter, 'nanoscale' mixing processes occurring in liquids. (2016-05-03)

Discovery sets new world standard in nano generators
A team of University of Alberta engineers has developed a new way to produce electrical power that can charge handheld devices or sensors that monitor anything from pipelines to medical implants. The discovery sets a new world standard in triboelectric nanogenerators by producing a high-density DC current--a vast improvement over low-quality AC currents produced by other research teams. The devices can transform mechanical energy such as wind or vibrations into electricity. (2017-12-11)

Mimicking a sweet solution to mop up pollution
A fast and safe method to prepare a 3D porous material that mimics the shape of a honeycomb could have broad applications from catalysis to drug delivery or for filtering air to remove pollutants or viruses. (2018-05-11)

World's strongest bio-material outperforms steel and spider silk
At DESY's X-ray light source PETRA III, a team led by Swedish researchers has produced the strongest bio-material that has ever been made. The artificial, but biodegradable cellulose fibers are stronger than steel and even than dragline spider silk, which is usually considered the strongest bio-based material. The team headed by Daniel Söderberg from the KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm reports the work in the journal ACS Nano of the American Chemical Society. (2018-05-16)

New 'nanotweezers' open door to innovations in medicine, mobile tech
It's difficult to conceptualize a world where humans could casually manipulate nanoscale objects at will or even control their own biological matter at a cellular level with light. But that is precisely what Yuebing Zheng, assistant professor of mechanical engineering at the University of Texas at Austin, is working toward with his 'nanotweezers' -- a new tool for handling nanoparticles using light that could create opportunities for innovations in nanotechnology and individual health monitoring. (2018-03-27)

Ultra-thin memory storage device paves way for more powerful computing
A team of electrical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin, in collaboration with Peking University scientists, has developed the thinnest memory storage device with dense memory capacity, paving the way for faster, smaller and smarter computer chips for everything from consumer electronics to big data to brain-inspired computing. (2018-01-17)

Experiments at Berkeley Lab help trace interstellar dust back to solar system's formation
Experiments conducted at Berkeley Lab helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles -- collected from Earth's upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets -- contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system. (2018-06-11)

Revealing the mysteries of superconductors: Ames Lab's new scope takes a closer look
The US Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory has successfully demonstrated that a new type of optical magnetometer, the NV magnetoscope, can map a unique feature of superconductive materials that along with zero resistance defines the superconductivity itself. (2018-05-09)

Researchers make liquid crystals do the twist
Researchers from the University of Maryland have for the first time measured an effect that was predicted more than 40 years ago, called the Casimir torque. (2018-12-19)

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