Popular Nanotube News and Current Events

Popular Nanotube News and Current Events, Nanotube News Articles.
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Startup scales up CNT membranes to make carbon-zero fuels for less than fossil fuels
Mattershift, an NYC startup with alumni from MIT and Yale has achieved a breakthrough in making carbon nanotube (CNT) membranes at large scale. Tests confirming that Mattershift's large-scale CNT membranes match the characteristics and performance of small prototype CNT membranes previously reported in the scientific literature were published today in Science Advances. The startup is developing the technology's ability to combine and separate individual molecules to make fuel from CO2 removed from the air. (2018-03-09)

Tissue paper sensors show promise for health care, entertainment, robotics
University of Washington engineers have turned tissue paper -- similar to toilet tissue -- into a new kind of wearable sensor that can detect a pulse, a blink of an eye and other human movement. The sensor is light, flexible and inexpensive, with potential applications in health care, entertainment and robotics. (2018-02-14)

From 2D to 1D: Atomically quasi '1D' wires using a carbon nanotube template
Researchers from Tokyo Metropolitan University have used carbon nanotube templates to produce nanowires of transition metal monochalcogenide (TMM), which are only 3 atoms wide in diameter. These are 50 times longer than previous attempts and can be studied in isolation, preserving the properties of atomically quasi '1D' objects. The team saw that single wires twist when perturbed, suggesting that isolated nanowires have unique mechanical properties which might be applied to switching in nanoelectronics. (2019-04-20)

Carbon nanotubes outperform copper nanowires as interconnects
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a road map that brings academia and the semiconductor industry one step closer to realizing carbon nanotube interconnects, and alleviating the current bottleneck of information flow that is limiting the potential of computer chips in everything from personal computers to portable music players. (2008-03-13)

Outperforming nature's water filtration ability with nanotubes
At just the right size, carbon nanotubes can filter water with better efficiency than biological proteins, a new study reveals. (2017-08-24)

WPI mathematician is helping NASA spacecraft travel faster and farther
By combining cutting-edge machine learning with 19th-century mathematics, a Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) mathematician is working to make NASA spacecraft lighter and more damage tolerant by developing methods to detect imperfections in carbon nanomaterials used to make composite rocket fuel tanks and other spacecraft structures. (2019-08-22)

'Nanonet' circuits closer to making flexible electronics reality
Researchers have overcome a major obstacle in producing transistors from networks of carbon nanotubes, a technology that could make it possible to print circuits on plastic sheets for applications including flexible displays and an electronic skin to cover an entire aircraft to monitor crack formation. (2008-07-23)

New process enables easier isolation of carbon nanotubes
Using this new method, long carbon nanotubes with high structural integrity, and without contaminants, can be obtained. The improved characteristics of these high-quality nanotubes can then be utilized in fields such as materials science, and in electrical and biomedical applications. (2016-01-20)

Scientists make transparent materials absorb light
A group of physicists has demonstrated a highly unusual optical effect: They managed to 'virtually' absorb light using a material that has no light-absorbing capacity. The research findings, published in Optica, break new ground for the creation of memory elements for light. (2017-11-29)

Mass production of new class of semiconductors closer to reality
Two Waterloo chemists have made it easier for manufacturers to produce a new class of faster and cheaper semiconductors. (2018-02-09)

Scientists use carbon nanotube technology to develop robust water desalination membranes
A research team of Shinshu University, Japan, has developed robust reverse osmosis membranes that can endure large-scale water desalination. To meet the demand of potable water at low cost, more robust membranes capable of withstanding harsh conditions, while remaining chemically stable to tolerate cleaning treatments, are necessary. The key lays in carbon nanotechnology. A multi-walled carbon nanotube-polyamide nanocomposite membrane creates a protective effect that stabilized the linked molecules of the polyamide against chlorine. (2018-04-11)

Researchers charge ahead to develop better batteries
They die at the most inconvenient times. Cellphones go dark during important conversations because a battery hasn't been recharged. Or the automotive industry revs up with excitement for a new battery-powered vehicle, but it needs frequent recharging. Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have developed a high-powered, environmentally safe lithium-sulfur substitute that could drastically lengthen battery life. Their work has been published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. (2018-03-27)

Carbon nanotube measurements: latest in NIST 'how-to' series
NIST, in collaboration with NASA, has published detailed guidelines for making essential measurements on samples of single-walled carbon nanotubes. The new guide constitutes the current (2008-04-15)

Tiny nanomachine successfully completes test drive
Together with colleagues from the USA, scientists from the University of Bonn and the research institute Caesar in Bonn have used nanostructures to construct a tiny machine that constitutes a rotatory motor and can move in a specific direction. The researchers used circular structures from DNA. The results will now be presented in the journal (2018-04-09)

Semiconducting carbon nanotubes can reduce noise in carbon nanotube interconnects
This paper presents reduction of crosstalk and noise in CNT bundle interconnects. We propose the use of small diameter semiconducting CNTs as electromagnetic interference shields for CNT bundle interconnects. (2017-11-17)

Single-photon emitter has promise for quantum info-processing
Los Alamos National Laboratory has produced the first known material capable of single-photon emission at room temperature and at telecommunications wavelengths. (2017-07-31)

Boiling breakthrough: Nano-coating doubles rate of heat transfer
The old saw that a watched pot never boils may not apply to pots given an ultra-thin layer of aluminum oxide, which researchers have reported can double the heat transfer from a hot surface to a liquid. (2012-02-15)

Researchers advance technique to detect ovarian cancer
Researchers refine and run the first in vivo tests that use fluorescent nanotube-based probes to locate specific tumors in the body. The ability to pinpoint them with submillimeter accuracy could improve early detection and treatment of ovarian cancer. (2017-11-30)

Nanotube fibers in a jiffy
Rice University scientists are making short carbon nanotube fibers by hand as a way to quickly test materials before spinning industrial quantities of fiber for aerospace, automotive, medical and smart-clothing applications. (2018-01-11)

Graphene-nanotube hybrid boosts lithium metal batteries
Rice University scientists build high-capacity lithium metal batteries with anodes made of a graphene-carbon nanotube hybrid. The anodes quench the formation of damaging dendrites. (2017-05-18)

Exotic nanotubes move in less-mysterious ways
Rice University researchers capture the first video of boron nitride nanotubes in motion to prove their potential for materials and medical applications. (2020-06-02)

How to draw electricity from the bloodstream
Men build dams and huge turbines to turn the energy of waterfalls and tides into electricity. To produce hydropower on a much smaller scale, Chinese scientists have now developed a lightweight power generator based on carbon nanotube fibers suitable to convert even the energy of flowing blood in blood vessels into electricity. They describe their innovation in the journal Angewandte Chemie. (2017-09-08)

USTC realizes strong indirect coupling in distant nanomechanical resonators
USTC Guo's team realized strong coupling between distant phonon modes, by introducing a third resonator as a phonon cavity mode. (2018-01-29)

No batteries required: Energy-harvesting yarns generate electricity
An international research team led by scientists at The University of Texas at Dallas and Hanyang University in South Korea has developed high-tech yarns that generate electricity when they are stretched or twisted. In a study published in the Aug. 25 issue of the journal Science, researchers describe 'twistron' yarns and their possible applications, such as harvesting energy from the motion of ocean waves or from temperature fluctuations. (2017-08-24)

Plasmons triggered in nanotube quantum wells
A novel quantum effect observed in a carbon nanotube film could lead to the development of near-infrared lasers and other optoelectronic devices, according to scientists at Rice University and Tokyo Metropolitan University. (2018-03-16)

Reusable carbon nanotubes could be the water filter of the future, says RIT study
Enhanced single-walled carbon nanotubes offer a more effective and sustainable approach to water treatment and remediation than the standard industry materials -- silicon gels and activated carbon -- according to a paper by RIT researchers John-David Rocha and Reginald Rogers. (2017-03-29)

Brown researchers work toward ending cartilage loss
Brown University nanotechnology engineer Thomas Webster has published a first-ever study that shows how a surface of carbon nanotubes combined with electrical pulses could help regenerate cartilage naturally in the body. (2008-06-03)

Hiring antibodies as nanotechnology builders
Researchers at the University of Rome Tor Vergata recruit antibodies as molecular builders to assemble nanoscale structures made of synthetic DNA. (2019-12-03)

Carbon nanotubes devices may have a limit to how 'nano' they can be
Carbon nanotubes bound for electronics not only need to be as clean as possible to maximize their utility in next-generation nanoscale devices, but contact effects may limit how small a nano device can be, according to researchers at the Energy Safety Research Institute (ESRI) at Swansea University in collaboration with researchers at Rice University. (2018-01-03)

Carbon nanotubes made into conductive, flexible 'stained glass'
Carbon nanotubes are promising materials for many high-technology applications due to their exceptional mechanical, thermal, chemical, optical and electrical properties. Now researchers at Northwestern University have used metallic nanotubes to make thin films that are semitransparent, highly conductive, flexible and come in a variety of colors, with an appearance similar to stained glass. These results could lead to improved high-tech products such as flat-panel displays and solar cells. (2008-04-08)

New hybrid nanostructures detect nanoscale magnetism
Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have created a new process for growing a single multi-walled carbon nanotube that is embedded with cobalt nanostructures. Using this new hybrid material, the team determined that the electrical conductance of MWCNTs is sensitive enough to detect and be affected by trace amounts of magnetic activity. It is believed to be the first instance of demonstrating the detection of magnetic fields of such small magnets using an individual carbon nanotube. (2008-12-08)

UConn chemists find secret to increasing luminescence efficiency of carbon nanotubes
University of Connecticut chemists have found a way to greatly increase the luminescence efficiency of carbon nanotubes by wrapping them in a chemical (2009-03-06)

Research boosts efficiency and stability of optical rectennas
The research team that announced the first optical rectenna in 2015 is now reporting a two-fold efficiency improvement in the devices -- and a switch to air-stable diode materials. The improvements could allow the rectennas -- which convert electromagnetic fields at optical frequencies directly to electrical current - to operate low-power devices such as temperature sensors. (2018-01-26)

Novel sensors could enable smarter textiles
A fabric coating with thin, lightweight and flexible pressure sensors that can be embedded into shoes and other functional garments, sensors that can measure everything from the light touch of a finger to being driven over by a forklift. And it's comfortable to boot! (2018-08-16)

Nanotubes change the shape of water
Nanotubes of the right diameter can prompt water inside to solidify into a square tube, transitioning into a kind of ice. The discovery could lead to new types of nanochannels devices, like nanoscale capacitors or syringes. (2018-08-24)

Touchy nanotubes work better when clean
Heating carbon nanotubes at high temperatures and slowly cooling them eliminates contaminants that make nanotubes difficult to test for conductivity. Scientists from Rice and Swansea universities show how decontaminated nanotubes may simplify the design and manufacture of nanoscale devices. (2018-01-04)

Microwaved nanotubes come up clean
Researchers use a household microwave oven to enhance the purification of carbon nanotubes. The work could help in the preparation of nanotubes for drug delivery or photovoltaic applications. (2016-01-22)

Improved method of delivering anti-cancer drugs
A new non-toxic method for delivering anti-cancer drugs to specific parts of the human body could mean the end of the severe and nasty side effects associated with many cancer therapies, according to researchers at Cardiff University's School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences. (2018-04-18)

Nanotubes may give the world better batteries
Rice University scientists use thin films of multiwalled carbon nanotubes to keep lithium metal from sprouting dendrites, tentacle-like growths that can cause batteries to fail. The strategy could be key to developing batteries that hold more energy and charge faster than current, ubiquitous lithium-ion batteries. (2018-10-25)

Future flexible electronics based on carbon nanotubes
Researchers have demonstrated a new method to improve the reliability and performance of transistors and circuits based on carbon nanotubes, a semiconductor material that has long been considered by scientists as one of the most promising successors to silicon for smaller, faster and cheaper electronic devices. The result appears in a new paper published in the journal Applied Physics Letters. (2014-09-23)

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