Popular Natural Disasters News and Current Events

Popular Natural Disasters News and Current Events, Natural Disasters News Articles.
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Marine oil snow
Marine snow is the phenomena of flakes of falling organic material and biological debris cascading down a water column like snowflakes. But an oil spill like Deepwater Horizon will add oil and dispersants to the mix, making marine oil snow that is can be toxic to organisms in deep-sea ecosystems. (2019-06-11)

Science for a resilient EU power grid
The Joint Research Centre, the European Commission's science and knowledge service, have analysed 16 earthquakes, 15 space weather events and 20 floods, presenting recommendations on how to improve the resilience of the power grid against these natural hazards. (2018-01-04)

Wildfire risk doesn't douse housing demand
Demand for real estate rebounds in high-risk areas within one to two years of a wildfire, UNLV study finds. Here's what the research may mean for homeowners in California and beyond. (2018-08-27)

Climate change's toll on mental health
When people think about climate change, they probably think first about its effects on the environment, and possibly on their physical health. But climate change also takes a significant toll on mental health, according to a new report released by the American Psychological Association and ecoAmerica entitled 'Mental Health and Our Changing Climate: Impacts, Implications, and Guidance.' (2017-03-29)

Cholesterol-like molecules switch off the engine in cancer-targeting Natural Killer cells
The engine used by cancer-killing 'Natural Killer' cells is turned on by a protein called Srebp, which can be blocked by certain sterols like cholesterol. Tumor cells can produce oxysterols and cholesterol levels tend to be higher in people with obesity. (2017-09-18)

Thin to win
University of Utah electrical and computer engineering researchers have developed a new kind of optical lens that is much thinner and lighter than conventional camera lenses that also works with night imaging, a future boon for smartphones that could flatten those unsightly 'camera bumps' as well as for drones and night vision cameras for soldiers. (2019-10-08)

Tracing how disaster impacts escalate will improve emergency responses
Mapping common pathways along which the effects of natural and man-made disasters travel allows more flexible and resilient responses in the future, according to UCL researchers. (2018-01-11)

Fungi the cause of many outbreaks of disease but mostly ignored
Many people, scientists among them, are largely unaware of the roles fungi play in the world around us. Research on fungi and fungal diseases are seriously neglected as a result -- a situation with grave negative repercussions for human health, agriculture, and the environment -- according to a new report from the American Academy of Microbiology. (2008-07-01)

Breaking up amino acids with radiation
A new experimental and theoretical study published in EPJ D has shown how the ions formed when electrons collide with one amino acid, glutamine, differ according to the energy of the colliding electrons. This has implications for improving radiotherapy for cancer and understanding the origin of life. (2020-02-05)

An oil-eating bacterium that can help clean up pollution and spills
Oil spills occur on a regular basis, leading to messy decontamination challenges. But however widespread and serious the damage may be, the solution could be microscopic -- Alcanivorax borkumensis -- a bacterium that feeds on hydrocarbons. A research team at INRS show the effectiveness of enzymes produced by the bacterium in degrading petroleum products in soil and water. Their results offer hope for a simple, effective, and eco-friendly method of decontaminating water and soil at oil sites. (2018-04-09)

Calculating the impacts of natural events on wildlife
A new method could help scientists understand how wildlife populations are affected by major natural events, such as hurricanes, severe winters, and tsunamis. (2018-03-30)

Medical school applicants should be screened for personality disorders to prevent ethical disasters
Medical schools should screen applicants for personality disorders before granting them entry, finds a study in the Journal of Medical Ethics. This would help clarify their ethical stance and help to avoid disasters such as the UK Shipman murders, say the authors. (2001-11-28)

Climate change increases potential for conflict and violence
Images of extensive flooding or fire-ravaged communities help us see how climate change is accelerating the severity of natural disasters. Iowa State researchers say what is not as clear is the indirect effect of these disasters and rapid climate change on violence and aggression. They have identified three ways climate change will increase the likelihood of violence. (2019-02-13)

Countries most affected by weather disasters do not spend more on weather services
Countries hit hardest by weather-related disasters do not necessarily spend more on commercial weather and climate information services that assist in preparing for these events, a new study finds. Identifying countries for which this is true and improving the design and delivery of weather and climate services in these locations could lead to better decision-making regarding risks and challenges, ultimately helping to save lives, protect infrastructure, and move people out of poverty. (2017-05-24)

Batman's Gotham City provides test case for community resilience model
If a community is resilient, it can withstand and recover from an unanticipated disaster, like an earthquake, fire or flood. But since every disaster and every community is unique, a uniform measure for defining 'resilience' has been hard to come by for engineers and social scientists. A new study offers an innovative approach to defining resilience that could help communities better prepare for hazards. (2018-01-05)

Evolution: The beneficiaries of mass extinction
Mass extinctions were followed by periods of low diversity in which certain new species dominated wide regions of the supercontinent Pangaea, reports a new study. (2017-10-10)

American 'prepping' culture influenced by media and government fears
The act of 'prepping' is not driven by delusional fears of society's imminent collapse, but more a response to fears raised by the media and government over short-term, but possible, shocks to society. (2018-05-23)

Scientists to build the avian tree of life
With the support of the National Science Foundation, scientists have embarked on a large-scale project to build the evolutionary tree of all bird species using cutting-edge technologies to collect DNA from across the genome. This project, called OpenWings, will produce the most complete evolutionary tree of any vertebrate group to-date. (2018-04-11)

Manure could heat your home
Farm manure could be a viable source of renewable energy to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions that cause global warming. (2018-03-08)

Novel approach to making therapeutic proteins at point of care
A novel approach to making therapeutic proteins allows medicine to be developed in a suitcase-size system. (2018-07-10)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma treatment
India is a second largest producer of leather, and being so, leather production and dyeing significantly contribute to pollution of water resources in India. Consistent dyeing of leather is difficult due to the unique nature of the raw material (matrix of collagen fibers), thus leather dyeing and finishing involves numerous wet chemical treatments having huge environmental impacts. (2017-08-29)

'Excess emissions' make significant contribution to air pollution
A study by Indiana University researchers shows that excess emissions -- which occur with plant shut-downs, start-ups and malfunctions, and not just in connection with natural disasters -- can make serious contributions to overall air pollution. (2018-02-14)

Mass extinction with prior warning
Mass extinctions throughout the history of the Earth have been well documented. Scientists believe that they occurred during a short period of time in geological terms. In a new study, FAU paleobiologists and their research partners have now shown that signs that the largest mass extinction event in the Earth's history was approaching became apparent much earlier than previously believed, and point out that the same indicators can be observed today. (2018-03-27)

NASA satellite highlights burn scars in British Columbia
This past summer Canada has been plagued with huge forest fires that have spanned most of the provinces. British Columbia has been particularly hard hit with large portions of the landscape being decimated by fire. In these satellite images taken by the NASA'S Aqua satellite, both the natural color and false color burn scars of left by fires can be seen. (2017-09-29)

Evolution of psychiatric disorders and human personality traits
How and why human-unique characteristics such as highly social behavior, languages and complex culture have evolved is a long-standing question. A research team led by Tohoku University in Japan has revealed the evolution of a gene related to such human-unique psychiatric traits. (2018-09-07)

Pollution responsible for 16 percent of deaths globally -- Lancet Commission report
Diseases caused by pollution were responsible in 2015 for an estimated 9 million premature deaths -- 16 percent of all deaths worldwide, according to a report by The Lancet Commission on Pollution and Health. SFU health sciences professor Bruce Lanphear is a commissioner and author. (2017-10-20)

Personal growth often coexists with post-traumatic stress following natural disasters
The 2011 tornado in Joplin, Missouri, was one of the most destructive in US history -- killing 161 people, injuring 1,150 and destroying approximately one-third of the city's homes. Researchers from the University of Missouri have found that survivors of natural disasters have the potential to experience positive changes or growth in addition to the stress they experience. Researchers say this finding can help those working in communities after a disaster. (2018-01-10)

3-D printed coral could help endangered reefs
Threats to coral reefs are everywhere--rising water temperatures, ocean acidification, coral bleaching, fishing and other human activities. But new research from the University of Delaware shows that 3-D printed coral can provide a structural starter kit for reef organisms and can become part of the landscape as fish and coral build their homes around the artificial coral. (2019-10-16)

Jelawat not seen as a threat to the Philippines
Tropical Depression Jelawat, a newly formed tropical cyclone over Western Micronesia is expected to strengthen into a Tropical Storm and enter the southeastern border of the Philippines by this afternoon (March 26). (2018-03-26)

Limiting tumors' ability to hide from the immune system
Scientists have discovered a way to stop tumors from shedding certain proteins that the immune system uses to identify and attack tumors. (2018-03-29)

Coming soon: Oil spill-mapping swarms of flying drones
Partly inspired by the dynamics of a flock of birds, engineers devised a computational method for drones to quickly record whether they are over water, oil or the edge of the spill. This simple information is shared with the other drones in the swarm, as opposed to sharing actual images or video, which would require too much bandwidth. (2017-02-27)

Hurricane Harvey: Dutch-Texan research shows most fatalities occurred outside flood zones
Scientists found that most Houston-area drowning deaths from Hurricane Harvey occurred outside the zones designated by government as being at higher risk of flooding: the 100- and 500-year floodplains. Harvey, one of the costliest storms in US history, hit Texas on Aug. 25, 2017, causing unprecedented flooding and killing dozens. Researchers at Delft University of Technology and Rice University published their results today in the European Geosciences Union journal Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. (2018-04-19)

Florida flood risk study identifies priorities for property buyouts
A study of flood damage in Florida by scientists at UC Santa Cruz and the Nature Conservancy proposes prioritizing property buyouts based on flood risk, ecological value, and socioeconomic conditions. Forecasters say an above-normal hurricane season is likely in the Atlantic Ocean this year, while a rising sea level is making Florida increasingly vulnerable to dangerous flooding. (2017-08-17)

The losses that come after the earthquake: Devastating and costly
The study, titled, 'Losses Associated with Secondary Effects in Earthquakes,' published by Frontiers in Built Environmen, looks at the devastation resulting from secondary disasters, such as tsunamis, liquefaction of sediments, fires, landslides, and flooding that occurred during 100 key earthquakes that occurred from 1900 to the present. And unlike previous studies, Daniell et al put a dollar value to the devastation from these secondary causes. (2017-08-25)

Algorithm identifies vulnerable people during natural disasters
A new algorithm developed at the University of Waterloo will help first responders and home care providers better help the elderly during natural disasters. (2018-02-02)

Nuclear power shutdowns won't spike power prices
Despite economic woes that could shutter two of Pennsylvania's nuclear power plants -- which generate 6 percent of the state's power -- power prices will remain steady due to low natural gas prices, according to Seth Blumsack, associate professor of energy policy and economics, Penn State. (2018-06-19)

When natural disaster strikes, can insects and other invertebrates recover?
After a 100-year flood struck south central Oklahoma in 2015, a study of the insects, arthropods, and other invertebrates in the area revealed striking declines of most invertebrates in the local ecosystem, a result that researchers say illustrates the hidden impacts of natural disasters. (2018-03-15)

Review of Chinese atmospheric science research over the past 70 years: Climate and climate change
Over the past 70 years since the foundation of the People's Republic of China, Chinese scientists have made great contributions to various fields in the research of atmospheric sciences, which attracted worldwide attention. In the field of climate and climate change, we have witnessed multiple remarkable achievements by Chinese scientists. (2019-12-17)

A better informed society can prevent lead poisoning disasters
In a paper published Sept. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, John R. Scully and Raymond J. Santucci address unresolved scientific questions that can help avert future lead poisoning disasters. A better-informed society can prevent such disasters from happening through improved risk assessment, anticipation and management of factors affecting lead release. (2020-09-18)

300,000 families living in US-Mexico border towns face exposure to toxic stress
Roughly 300,000 Texans living in impoverished border communities known as 'colonias' are facing substandard housing, lack of resources and exposure to toxic stress. New research finds these communities are also ill-equipped to face a natural disaster. (2017-09-15)

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