Popular Nervous System News and Current Events

Popular Nervous System News and Current Events, Nervous System News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
Gene medication to help treat spinal cord injuries
The two-gene medication has been proven to recover motor functions in rats. After several months of treatment, rodents were able to use previously paralyzed limbs. Researchers at Kazan Federal University are now seeking pre-clinical trial investment. (2019-03-18)

Extraordinary regeneration of neurons in zebrafish
Biologists from the University of Bayreuth have discovered a uniquely rapid form of regeneration in injured neurons and their function in the central nervous system of zebrafish. They studies the Mauthner cells, which are solely responsible for the escape behaviour of the fish, and previously regarded as incapable of regeneration. However, their ability to regenerate crucially depends on the location of the injury. (2020-07-10)

Neurons that regenerate, neurons that die
In a new study published in Neuron, investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others. (2017-06-21)

Engineering researchers use laser to 'weld' neurons
University of Alberta researchers have developed a method of connecting neurons, using ultrashort laser pulses -- a breakthrough technique that opens the door to new medical research and treatment opportunities. Neurons are cells in the nervous system that are responsible for transferring information between the brain and the rest of the body. The team is the first ever to find a way to bond neurons and in doing so, is giving researchers a powerful new tool. (2016-02-09)

Immune system may have another job -- combatting depression
An inflammatory autoimmune response within the central nervous system similar to one linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) has also been found in the spinal fluid of healthy people, according to a new Yale-led study comparing immune system cells in the spinal fluid of MS patients and healthy subjects. The research, published Sept. 18 in the journal Science Immunology, suggests these immune cells may play a role other than protecting against microbial invaders -- protecting our mental health. (2020-09-18)

Physiological markers for cutting, other self-harming behaviors by teenage girls found
Non-fatal, self-inflicted injuries by adolescent and young adult females have become major public health problems and researchers have found physiological evidence that this behavior may lead to a more serious psychological condition called borderline personality disorder. (2006-06-16)

Probiotics could help millions of patients suffering from bipolar disorder
About 3 million people in the US are diagnosed every year with bipolar disorder, a psychiatric condition characterized by dramatic shifts in mood from depression to mania. Currently, the standard treatment includes a combination of psychotherapy and prescription medications such as mood stabilizers and antipsychotics. (2018-12-13)

True nature of cells blamed in Alzheimer's revealed
Immune cells commonly blamed in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases are actually precision cleaning machines protecting the central nervous system, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows. (2018-06-25)

Neurological signals from the spinal cord surprise scientists
With a study of the network between nerve and muscle cells in turtles, researchers from the University of Copenhagen have gained new insight into the way in which movements are generated and maintained. In the long term, the new knowledge may have an impact on the treatment of, for example, ALS and spinal cord injuries. (2019-09-19)

Parkinson's and the immune system
Mutations in the Parkin gene are a common cause of hereditary forms of Parkinson's disease. Similar to Parkin, the neighboring Parkin Co-Regulated Gene PACRG regulates a signalling pathway that plays an important role in the innate immune system. This was discovered by a team of researchers led by Professor Konstanze Winklhofer from the Department of Molecular Cell Biology at Ruhr-Universit├Ąt Bochum (RUB). (2020-02-05)

Neurons thrive even when malnourished
When animal, insect or human embryos grow in a malnourished environment, their developing nervous systems get first pick of any available nutrients so that new neurons can be made. (2020-06-24)

Trains, planes, automobiles and heart disease
Noise may disrupt the body on the cellular level in a way that increases the risk of common heart disease risk factors, according to a review topic published today in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology that examined the underlying mechanisms that may lead to noise-induced heart disease. The review is in response to growing evidence connecting environmental noise, including from road traffic and aircrafts, to the development of heart disease, such as coronary artery disease, arterial hypertension, stroke and heart failure. (2018-02-05)

The sea anemone, an animal that hides its complexity well
Despite its apparent simplicity -- a tube-like body topped with tentacles -- the sea anemone is actually a highly complex creature. Scientists from the Institut Pasteur, in collaboration with the CNRS, have just discovered over a hundred different cell types in this small marine invertebrate as well as incredible neuronal diversity. This surprising complexity was revealed when the researchers built a real cell atlas of the animal. (2018-07-09)

Learning a second alphabet for a first language
A part of the brain that maps letters to sounds can acquire a second, visually distinct alphabet for the same language, according to a study of English speakers published in eNeuro. The research challenges theoretical constraints on the range of visual forms available to represent written language. (2019-02-11)

A mechanical way to stimulate neurons
Magnetic nanodiscs can be activated by an external magnetic field, providing a research tool for studying neural responses. (2020-07-20)

Mapping the neurons of the rat heart in 3D
A team of researchers has developed a virtual 3D heart, digitally showcasing the heart's unique network of neurons for the first time. Using the rat heart as a model, the investigators in this study -- appearing May 26 in the journal iScience -- created a comprehensive map of the intrinsic cardiac nervous system (ICN) at a cellular scale. This map lays the groundwork for developing virtual maps for other organs. (2020-05-26)

Multiple sclerosis: Cholesterol crystals prevent regeneration in central nervous system
Multiple Sclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system, in which the immune cells attack myelin sheaths. Regeneration of myelin sheaths is necessary for patients to recover from MS relapses. Nevertheless, the ability to regenerate decreases with age. A team from Technical University Munich has published an explanation in (2018-01-04)

How synaptic changes translate to behavior changes
Learning changes behavior by altering many connections between brain cells in a variety of ways all at the same time, according to a study of sea slugs recently published in JNeurosci. The findings offer insight into how human learning can impact widespread brain areas. (2020-05-04)

Tumor-killing virus selectively targets diseased brain cells
New findings show that a specialized virus with the ability to reproduce its tumor-killing genes can selectively target tumors in the brains of mice and eliminate them. Healthy brain tissue remained virtually untouched, according to a Feb. 20 report in the Journal of Neuroscience. With more research, the technique could one day offer a novel way of treating brain cancer in humans. (2008-02-19)

The brain's favorite type of music
People prefer songs with only a moderate amount of uncertainty and unpredictability, according to research recently published in JNeurosci. (2019-10-21)

Study points to potential misuse/abuse of ADHD drugs
A new British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology study indicates that methylphenidate, a central nervous system stimulant approved to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and narcolepsy, may be subject to misuse and/or abuse. (2018-03-07)

Getting under the skin of prion disorders
Infectious prion proteins -- the causative agents of the fatal neurodegenerative disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease -- can be detected in the skin of afflicted individuals, researchers now report. (2017-11-22)

Stem cells found in adult skin can be transplanted and function in mouse models of disease
Researchers at The Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) and the University of Calgary have found that stem cells derived from adult skin can create neural cell types that can be transplanted into and function in mouse models of disease. This research is reported in the June 14, 2006 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience. (2006-06-14)

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels. This improvement in blood flow around the metastases can limit the neurological deterioration associated with the progression of this disease and improve the otherwise poor life expectancy of these patients. (2020-11-12)

Chronic fatigue syndrome linked to stomach virus
Chronic fatigue syndrome, also known as ME, is linked to a stomach virus, suggests research published ahead of print in Journal of Clinical Pathology. The researchers base their findings on 165 patients with ME, all of whom were subjected to endoscopy because of longstanding gut complaints. (2007-09-13)

A new way of thinking about tau kinetics, an essential component of Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease is most often characterized by two different pathologies in the brain: plaque deposits of a protein called beta-amyloid and tangles of another protein called tau. A paper appearing March 21 in the journal Neuron offers new insight: tau production and secretion from nerve cells appears to be an active process in the natural course of Alzheimer's disease, which may explain why experimental treatments targeting tau have had disappointing results. (2018-03-21)

New opioid speeds up recovery without increasing pain sensitivity or risk of chronic pain
A new type of non-addictive opioid developed by researchers at Tulane University and the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System accelerates recovery time from pain compared to morphine without increasing pain sensitivity, according to a new study published in the Journal of Neuroinflammation. (2019-05-21)

Efficacy of antibody targeting Devic's disease proven in new animal model
Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disease associated with NMO immunoglobulin G (NMO-IgG). A cure for NMO remains elusive. Osaka University researchers recently established a localized NMO rat model by injecting NMO-IgG into the spinal cord, and assessed the efficacy of anti-repulsive guidance molecule-a (RGMa) antibody in treating NMO. They found anti-RGMa antibody delayed the onset and attenuated the severity of clinical symptoms of NMO, suggesting that humanized anti-RGMa antibody is a potentially valid therapeutic approach for NMO. (2018-01-18)

Scientists shed light on biological roots of individuality
A new study illuminates the biology that guides behavior across different stages of life in worms, and suggests how variations in specific neuromodulators in the developing nervous system may lead to occasional variations. (2018-02-16)

What happens to our muscles during spaceflight and when living on Mars?
The inactivity of astronauts during spaceflights presents a significant risk to their muscles, says a new study in The Journal of Physiology. Scientists have simulated the impact of 21-day spaceflights on the body, and the impact of low gravity environments such as the moon or Mars. (2018-04-17)

The neuroscience of cuttlefish camouflage
Unlike squid, bottom-dwelling cuttlefish may be able to put one key aspect of their camouflage on autopilot. Marine Biological Laboratory and University of Cambridge researchers report that these cephalopods can lock in the 3-D textured shape of their dynamic skin for over an hour without nervous system input. This physiology is thought to help cuttlefish save energy as they camouflage from predators, wait for prey, or digest food. The study appears Feb. 15 in iScience. (2018-02-15)

Potential new approach to the treatment of multiple sclerosis
A prospective new method of treating patients with multiple sclerosis has been proposed by researchers of the Mainz University Medical Center working in cooperation with researchers of the University of Montreal. In model trials and experiments employing human endothelial cells, they discovered that the EGFL7 protein hinders the migration of immune cells into the central nervous system by stabilizing the blood-brain barrier. (2018-03-05)

Study reveals gaps in follow-up care after concussion
Being discharged from a hospital trauma center after receiving treatment for a traumatic brain injury (TBI) does not necessarily mean that a patient has fully recovered. TBI can lead to long-lasting physical and cognitive symptoms, but a new study in JAMA Network Open suggests that many patients may not be receiving follow-up care. (2018-05-25)

Mapping cells in the 'immortal' regenerating hydra
The tiny hydra, a freshwater invertebrate related to jellyfish and corals, has an amazing ability to renew its cells and regenerate damaged tissue. Cut a hydra in half, and it will regenerate its body and nervous system in a couple of days. Researchers at UC Davis have now traced the fate of hydra's cells, revealing how three lines of stem cells become nerves, muscles or other tissues. (2019-07-25)

Protein shown to play a key role in normal development of nervous system
A protein that enables nerve cells to communicate with each other plays a key role in controlling the developing nervous system. Research into how that protein helps precise connections to form among nerve cells may provide a basis for eventual treatments for patients who suffer injuries to their nervous system, including spinal cord injury. (2008-10-07)

Zika virus eliminates advanced human tumor in central nervous system of rodents
A group of Brazilian researchers confirmed for the 1st time in vivo the efficiency of Zika virus in infecting CNS tumor cells -- tests even showed that the resulting viral particles were less harmful than the ones created from infection of healthy cells. The team's plans include applying for patent on pharmaceutical kit and moving on to clinical trial phase in near future. (2018-04-26)

New nuclear medicine technique could help tackle brain disease
A new molecular imaging method can monitor the success of gene therapy in all areas of the brain, potentially allowing physicians to more effectively tackle brain conditions such as Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. The research was presented today at the SNMMI 2018 Annual Meeting, June 23-26 in Philadelphia. (2018-06-25)

PET detects neuroinflammation in multiple sclerosis
The triggers of autoimmune inflammation in multiple sclerosis (MS) have eluded scientists for many years, but molecular imaging is bringing researchers closer to identifying them, while providing a means of evaluating next-generation therapies for MS, say researchers introducing a study at the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging. (2016-06-12)

Aversion to holes driven by disgust, not fear, study finds
Clusters of holes may be evolutionarily indicative of contamination and disease -- visual cues for rotten or moldy food or skin marred by an infection. (2018-01-04)

A secret ingredient to help heal spinal cord injuries?
Researchers have identified a protein in zebrafish that facilitates healing of major spinal cord injuries. (2016-11-03)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.