Popular Neurodegenerative Diseases News and Current Events

Popular Neurodegenerative Diseases News and Current Events, Neurodegenerative Diseases News Articles.
Sort By: Most Relevant | Most Recent
Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
New therapeutic target for Huntington's treatment
Huntington's disease is caused by a mutation in the Huntingtin gene (HTT), which appears in adults and features motor, cognitive and psychiatric alterations. The origin of this disease has been associated with the anomalous functioning of the mutated protein: mHTT, but recent data showed the involvement of other molecular mechanisms. (2021-02-23)

Major NIH grant will support early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease via skin testing
An expert team from Case Western Reserve University has received a five-year, $3.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health for diagnosing Parkinson's disease (PD) via an innovative skin testing approach. (2019-10-04)

Basic cell health systems wear down in Huntington's disease, novel analysis shows
A new computational approach for analyzing complex datasets shows that as disease progresses, neurons and astrocytes lose the ability to maintain homeostasis. The ''Geomic'' approach can be applied to other diseases, authors say. (2021-02-23)

Not just images
Hebrew University scientists have successfully transformed an MRI from a diagnostic camera into a device that can record changes in the biological makeup of brain tissue. The development will help doctors understand whether a patient is merely aging or developing a neurodegenerative disease, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's. (2019-09-05)

Innate immune adaptor TRIF confers neuroprotection in ALS
Researchers led by Nagoya University report that deficiency of the innate immune adaptor TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF) significantly shortens survival time and accelerates disease progression of ALS mice. They revealed for the first time that the TRIF pathway is involved in eliminating aberrantly activated astrocytes to maintain the microenvironment surrounding motor neurons in ALS mice. This study provides a clue to develop a new therapeutic approach for protecting ALS motor neurons. (2018-04-15)

Genetic changes associated with physical activity reported
Machine learning used to improve understanding of sleep, physical (in)activity and their health consequences (2018-12-10)

Tipping the scales
Human cells have a sophisticated regulatory system at their disposal: labeling proteins with the small molecule ubiquitin. In a first, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has succeeded in marking proteins with ubiquitin in a targeted manner, in test tubes as well as in living cells. The procedure opens the door to exploring the inner workings of this vital regulatory system. (2019-04-03)

Flies the key to studying the causes of dementia
A research team from the University of Plymouth, University of Southampton and the Alexander Fleming Biomedical Sciences Research Center, Vari, Greece, have studied two structurally-similar proteins in the adult brain and have found that they play distinct roles in the development of dementia. (2017-05-19)

Hi-res view of protein complex shows how it breaks up protein tangles
A new, high-resolution view of the structure of Hsp104 (heat shock protein 104), a natural yeast protein nanomachine with six subunits, may show news ways to dismantle harmful protein clumps in disease. (2017-06-15)

Can chocolate, tea, coffee and zinc help make you more healthy?
Ageing and a low life expectancy are caused, at least partly, by oxidative stress. A team of researchers led by Prof. Dr. Ivana Ivanovi-Burmazovi from the Chair of Bioinorganic Chemistry at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU), together with researchers from the USA, have discovered that zinc can activate an organic molecule, helping to protect against oxidative stress. (2018-11-02)

Scientists move closer to treatment for Huntington's disease
Researchers show that a new version of the CRISPR/Cas9 system -- a modern tool for editing DNA -- is safer and more specific than versions previously used to remove the disease-causing DNA sequence in the defective gene that causes Huntington's disease. The study, which was carried out in cellular models from a Huntington's patient, brings a possible treatment for this currently incurable genetic disease one step closer. (2018-02-26)

True nature of cells blamed in Alzheimer's revealed
Immune cells commonly blamed in Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases are actually precision cleaning machines protecting the central nervous system, new research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine shows. (2018-06-25)

Study links asthma and allergic rhinitis with cataracts
In a study that investigated the association between allergic diseases and ophthalmologic diseases in 14,776 adults, asthma and allergic rhinitis were each associated with a 50 percent increased likelihood of having cataracts. Atopic dermatitis was not linked with cataracts in the Journal of Dermatology study, however. (2018-01-04)

Immune system may have another job -- combatting depression
An inflammatory autoimmune response within the central nervous system similar to one linked to neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS) has also been found in the spinal fluid of healthy people, according to a new Yale-led study comparing immune system cells in the spinal fluid of MS patients and healthy subjects. The research, published Sept. 18 in the journal Science Immunology, suggests these immune cells may play a role other than protecting against microbial invaders -- protecting our mental health. (2020-09-18)

Preclinical study of therapeutic strategy for Lafora disease shows promise
A team of scientists have designed and tested in mice a novel and promising therapeutic strategy for treating Lafora Disease (LD), a fatal form of childhood epilepsy. This new type of drug is a first-in-class therapy for LD and an example of precision medicine that has potential for treating other types of aggregate-based neurological diseases. (2019-07-25)

Discovery of a crucial immune reaction when solid food is introduced that prevents inflammatory disorders
In newborn infants, gut microbiota is first conditioned by breast milk components. When solid food is introduced, gut microbiota develops and bacteria proliferate. Scientists have discovered that a key immune response is generated in mice when solid food is introduced and microbiota expands. But, above all, they have shown that this immune reaction is essential as it is involved in educating the immune system and leads to low susceptibility to inflammatory disorders in adulthood. (2019-03-19)

New study suggests rethink of dementia causes
University of Adelaide researchers have developed a new theory for the causes of dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases, involving an out-of-control immune system. (2016-05-12)

Brain-aging gene discovered
Researchers at Columbia University Medical Center have discovered a common genetic variant that greatly affects normal brain aging in older adults. The discovery may point toward new targets for preventing or treating age-associated brain disorders such as Alzheimer's disease. (2017-03-15)

New system can identify drugs to target 'undruggable' enzymes critical in many diseases
A new drug discovery system allows scientists to specifically target members of an important family of enzymes, called phosphatases, which were previously considered mostly 'undruggable'. The study, published in Cell, demonstrated the capabilities of the new system by identifying a molecule that could successfully target a phosphatase to reduce the accumulation of Huntington's disease-associated proteins in the brains of mice. (2018-07-26)

Wiring diagram of the brain provides a clearer picture of brain scan data
In a study published today in the journal BRAIN, neuroscientists led by Michael D. Fox, M.D., Ph.D., of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) used data from the human brain connectome -- a publicly available 'wiring diagram' of the human brain based on data from thousands of healthy human volunteers -- to reassess the findings from neuroimaging studies of patients with Alzheimer's disease. (2018-12-14)

Protein offers protection against nerve degeneration in ALS model
Increasing the levels of the anti-aging protein hormone Klotho improves the neurological deficits and prolongs life span in an experimental model with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). In addition, brain immune cells called microglia play an important role in protecting the brain against inflammation and, likely, motor neuron loss in this model. (2019-06-27)

MGH team engineers anti-inflammatory antibodies that may treat autoimmune disease
A team of Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has found a way to engineer antibodies within an organism, converting autoantibodies that attack 'self' tissues into anti-inflammatory antibodies in animal models of two autoimmune diseases. (2017-12-21)

Getting under the skin of prion disorders
Infectious prion proteins -- the causative agents of the fatal neurodegenerative disorder Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease -- can be detected in the skin of afflicted individuals, researchers now report. (2017-11-22)

Circadian clock plays unexpected role in neurodegenerative diseases
Northwestern University researchers induced jet lag in a fruit fly model of Huntington disease and found that jet lag protected the flies' neurons. (2019-04-02)

Study finds genetic mutation causes 'vicious cycle' in most common form of ALS
University of Michigan-led research brings scientists one step closer to understanding the development of neurodegenerative disorders such as ALS. A study published today in Nature Communications details what the researchers describe as a vicious cycle of toxic protein production set in motion by cell stress. (2017-12-08)

Study reveals new mechanisms of cell death in neurodegenerative disorders
Researchers at King's College London have discovered new mechanisms of cell death, which may be involved in debilitating neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. (2017-11-22)

On the immortality of stem cells
Stem cells are considered to be immortal in culture and, therefore, of great interest for aging research. This immortality is regulated by increased proteostasis, which controls the quality of proteins. A team of researchers led by David Vilchez of the Cluster of Excellence CECAD at the University of Cologne found a link between increased proteostasis and immortality of human embryonic stem cells. Their results are published in the online research journal Scientific Reports. (2018-03-07)

Oligomerix and Feinstein Institutes publish in vivo Alzheimer's disease treatment data
Results published in Journal of Alzheimer's Disease show Tau Oligomer Inhibitor prevents downstream Alzheimer's disease events. (2019-11-19)

NIH scientists and collaborators find prion protein in skin of CJD patients
NIAID scientists and collaborators at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have detected abnormal prion protein in the skin of several people who died from Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). The scientists also exposed healthy mice to skin extracts from two CJD patients, and all developed prion disease. The study results raise questions about the possible transmissibility of prion diseases via medical procedures involving skin, and whether skin samples might be used to detect prion disease. (2017-11-22)

RNAs help molecules come together in liquid-like droplets within living cells
Researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill collaborated to determine how proteins and messenger RNAs condense into liquid-like droplets within cells. The activity is a normal biological process, but it can lead to neurodegenerative diseases like Parkinson's disease when it goes awry. The researchers found that the process is regulated by molecules of RNA that recognize each other and combine based on the very specific and complex shapes of RNA molecules. (2018-04-12)

Brain metastases cause severe brain damage that can be inhibited by treatment
By using a specific treatment to override this activation, the researchers were able to return cerebrovascular flow to healthy levels. This improvement in blood flow around the metastases can limit the neurological deterioration associated with the progression of this disease and improve the otherwise poor life expectancy of these patients. (2020-11-12)

Ancient anti-inflammatory drug salicylic acid has cancer-fighting properties
Scientists from the Gladstone Institutes have identified a new pathway by which salicylic acid -- a key compound in the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs aspirin and diflunisal -- stops inflammation and tumor growth in cancer. Both salicylic acid and diflunisal suppress two key proteins that help control gene expression throughout the body. By inhibiting these proteins, the two drugs block the activation of other proteins involved in inflammation and cell growth, including one linked to leukemia. (2016-05-31)

FDA-approved high blood pressure drug extends life span in roundworms
An FDA-approved drug to treat high blood pressure seems to extend life span in worms via a cell signaling pathway that may mimic caloric restriction. (2017-12-20)

New finding will help target MS immune response
Researchers have made another important step in the progress towards being able to block the development of multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. (2015-10-29)

Protein plays Jekyll and Hyde role in Lou Gehrig's disease
Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, more commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by the death of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord that control muscle movements from walking and swallowing to breathing. In a groundbreaking study this week in PLoS Biology, Brandeis and Harvard Medical School scientists report key findings about the cause and occurrence of the familial form of ALS. (2008-07-28)

Study implicates potassium channel mutations in neurodegeneration and mental retardation
For the first time, researchers have linked mutations in a gene that regulates how potassium enters cells to a neurodegenerative disease and to another disorder that causes mental retardation and coordination problems. The findings may lead to new ways of treating a broad range of disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. (2006-02-26)

Changing size of neurons could shed light on new treatments for motor neurone disease
New research published in The Journal of Physiology improves our understanding of how motor nerve cells (neurons) respond to motor neurone disease, which could help us identify new treatment options. (2018-03-04)

Using the gut-brain connection to impact brain health and disease
Research on gut-brain communication via the immune system may help in the development of novel treatments for neurodegenerative diseases. The findings were presented at Neuroscience 2019, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience and the world's largest source of emerging news about brain science and health. (2019-10-21)

Eye changes may signal frontotemporal lobe degeneration
Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that is present in tens of thousands of Americans, but is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Now in a study published this week online ahead of print in Neurology, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found evidence that a simple eye exam and retinal imaging test may help improve that accuracy. (2017-09-08)

Improving the neuron factory -- new modulator of stem cell identity found
Since their discovery in 2006, induced pluripotent stem cells are a glimmer of hope for many diseases. But further research of the complex regulation of pluripotent stem cell identity revealed unexpected difficulties. A team of researchers at the Cluster of Excellence CECAD has now found an efficient way to produce neurons from pluripotent stem cells. Their research was published in Nature Communications. (2017-11-13)

Page 1 of 25 | 1000 Results
   First   Previous   Next      Last   
Brightsurf.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com.