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Popular Neurons News and Current Events, Neurons News Articles.
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Easy on the eyes
New computer program uses artificial intelligence to determine what visual neurons like to see. (2019-05-02)
All too human
Professor Rony Paz of the Weizmann Institute of Science suggests that our brains are like modern washing machines -- evolved to have the latest sophisticated programming, but more vulnerable to breakdown and prone to develop costly disorders. (2019-01-22)
NIST chip lights up optical neural network demo
Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have made a silicon chip that distributes optical signals precisely across a miniature brain-like grid, showcasing a potential new design for neural networks. (2018-07-26)
Watching neurons in action
OIST scientists have devised a way of observing the working of single neurons in unsurpassed detail in a live animal. (2018-08-23)
WSU researchers discover new clues on how sleep works in the brain
Star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes appear to play an essential role in sleep, a new study by scientists from the Washington State University Sleep and Performance Research Center confirms. (2018-10-31)
During infancy, neurons are still finding their places
Researchers have identified a large population of previously unrecognized young neurons that migrate in the human brain during the first few months of life, contributing to the expansion of the frontal lobe, a region important for social behavior and executive function. (2016-10-06)
Brain neurons help keep track of time
Turning the theory of how the human brain perceives time on its head, a novel analysis in mice reveals that dopamine neuron activity plays a key role in judgment of time, slowing down the internal clock. (2016-12-08)
How many types of neurons are there in the brain?
For decades, scientists have struggled to develop a comprehensive census of cell types in the brain. (2016-03-03)
Engineering researchers use laser to 'weld' neurons
University of Alberta researchers have developed a method of connecting neurons, using ultrashort laser pulses -- a breakthrough technique that opens the door to new medical research and treatment opportunities. (2016-02-09)
Molecular body guards for neurons
In the brain, patterns of neural activity are perfectly balanced. (2016-03-02)
'Filter' hones GWAS results to help researchers avoid dead ends
A genetics research team at Johns Hopkins Medicine has solved a dilemma facing researchers who use genomewide association studies (GWAS) by developing a new approach that strategically 'filters' which genes are worth further study. (2018-03-05)
Neurons that regenerate, neurons that die
In a new study published in Neuron, investigators report on a transcription factor that they have found that can help certain neurons regenerate, while simultaneously killing others. (2017-06-21)
New tool to identify and control neurons
One of the big challenges in the Neuroscience field is to understand how connections and communications trigger our behavior. (2017-06-26)
Innate immune adaptor TRIF confers neuroprotection in ALS
Researchers led by Nagoya University report that deficiency of the innate immune adaptor TIR domain-containing adaptor inducing interferon-β (TRIF) significantly shortens survival time and accelerates disease progression of ALS mice. (2018-04-15)
A turbo engine for tracing neurons
Putting a turbo engine into an old car gives it an entirely new life -- suddenly it can go further, faster. (2017-04-27)
How neurons use crowdsourcing to make decisions
When many individual neurons collect data, how do they reach a unanimous decision? (2017-06-06)
Neurons can learn temporal patterns
Individual neurons can learn not only single responses to a particular signal, but also a series of reactions at precisely timed intervals. (2017-05-29)
Antibodies protect nerve-muscle connections in a mouse model of Lou Gehrig's disease
A new study led by NYU School of Medicine researchers identifies a novel treatment strategy that preserved neuromuscular synapses in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. (2018-02-20)
One or the other: Why strength training might come at the expense of endurance muscles
The neurotransmitter brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts in the muscle, so that during strength training endurance muscle fiber number is decreased. (2019-07-25)
New model may provide insights on neurocognitive disorders caused by HIV
HIV infects certain cells in the brain called microglia, and infected microglia release toxic and inflammatory molecules that can impair or kill surrounding neurons. (2017-11-08)
Balancing time & space in the brain: New model holds promise for predicting brain dynamics
A team of scientists has extended the balanced network model to provide deep and testable predictions linking brain circuits to brain activity. (2016-10-31)
Memory ensembles
For over forty years, neuro-scientists have been interested in the biological mechanisms underlying the storage of the information that our brain records every day. (2016-02-11)
Sensory stimuli control dopamine in the brain
Type and intensity of stimuli control the activity of nerve cells that release the neurotransmitter dopamine. (2017-01-13)
TSRI researchers uncover culprit in Parkinson's brain cell die-off
Researchers investigate the connection between misfolded proteins and the destruction of mitochondria in neurons. (2018-03-05)
Growing and moving
How interactions between neuronal migration and outgrowth shape network architecture. (2019-10-09)
Neurotrophic factor GDNF is an important regulator of dopamine neurons in the brain
New research results are expanding our understanding of the physiological role of the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor GDNF in the function of the brain's dopamine systems. (2017-02-15)
New way to study swallowing could one day lead to improved treatments for ALS
There is no cure for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's Disease, but new findings from the University of Missouri School of Medicine and the University of Missouri College of Veterinary Medicine are deepening researchers' understanding of a common ALS symptom: swallowing problems. (2018-11-14)
How does the brain learn by talking to itself?
One of the greatest challenges of systems neuroscience is to explain how synaptic connections change to support adaptive behaviours. (2019-01-02)
NUS researchers unravel new insights into how brain beats distractions to retain memories
Researchers from the National University of Singapore have recently discovered a mechanism that could explain how the brain retains working memory when faced with distractions. (2017-10-31)
Why do we fall asleep when bored?
University of Tsukuba researcher discovers why we have the tendency to fall asleep in the absence of motivating stimuli, i.e., when bored. (2017-09-29)
Breakthrough in the production of dopamine neurons for Parkinson's disease
Researchers at Lund University, Sweden, are rapidly moving towards the first ever transplantations of embryonic stem cell derived dopamine neurons in persons with Parkinson's disease. (2016-10-28)
Artificial intelligence singles out neurons faster than a human can
Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed an automated process that can track and map active neurons as accurately as a human can, but in a fraction of the time. (2019-04-12)
The sixth Ttaste?
UCSB biologists enhance the scientific understanding of calcium taste (2018-01-03)
Are you with me? New model explains origins of empathy
Researchers at the Max Planck Institute and the Santa Fe Institute have developed a new model to explain the evolutionary origins of empathy and other related phenomena, such as emotional contagion and contagious yawning. (2019-04-08)
Activating dopamine neurons could turn off binge-like eating behavior
While binge eating affects about 10 percent of adults in the United States, the neurobiological basis of the disease is unclear. (2016-08-08)
St. Jude finds signaling system that halts the growth of a childhood brain cancer
A discovery by St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists suggests a safer way to treat medulloblastoma, a rare but often fatal childhood brain tumor. (2008-03-14)
New method allows scientists to watch brain cells interacting in real time
An advance by UCLA neuroscientists could lead to a better understanding of astrocytes, a star-shaped brain cell believed to play a key role in neurological disorders like Lou Gehrig's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. (2018-04-04)
Mysterious 'neural noise' actually primes brain for peak performance
Researchers at the University of Rochester may have answered one of neuroscience's most vexing questions -- how can it be that our neurons, which are responsible for our crystal-clear thoughts, seem to fire in utterly random ways? (2006-11-10)
A new way of thinking about tau kinetics, an essential component of Alzheimer's disease
Alzheimer's disease is most often characterized by two different pathologies in the brain: plaque deposits of a protein called beta-amyloid and tangles of another protein called tau. (2018-03-21)
Growing a cerebral tract in a microscale brain model
An international research team led by The University of Tokyo modeled the growth of cerebral tracts. (2019-04-18)
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