Popular Neuroscientists News and Current Events

Popular Neuroscientists News and Current Events, Neuroscientists News Articles.
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Scientists identify circuit responsible for building memories during sleep
Neuroscientists at the University of Alberta have identified a mechanism that may help build memories during deep sleep, according to a new study. (2019-11-05)

A vision for revamping neuroscience education
The expanding scope and growing number of tools used for neuroscience is moving beyond what is taught in traditional graduate programs, say leaders in American neuroscience education, funding, and policy. In a paper published June 1, 2016 in Neuron, the authors call for reinvestment in neuroscience graduate and post-graduate training to meet the challenges of this new era in brain science -- such as creating programs to broaden student experiences across disciplines and reimagining scientific staff positions. (2016-06-01)

Sleep chemical central to effectiveness of deep brain stimulation
A brain chemical that makes us sleepy also appears to play a central role in the success of deep brain stimulation to ease symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease and other brain disorders. The surprising finding is outlined in a paper published online Dec. 23 in Nature Medicine. (2007-12-23)

Brain pattern flexibility and behavior
The scientists analyzed an extensive data set of brain region connectivity from the NIH-funded Human Connectome Project (HCP) which is mapping neural connections in the brain and makes its data publicly available. (2016-11-29)

Nature, meet nurture
Is it nature or nurture that ultimately shapes an organism? A new study reveals a dramatic landscape of gene expression changes across all cell types in the mouse visual cortex after a sensory experience, many linked to neural connectivity and the brain's ability to rewire itself to learn and adapt. (2018-02-08)

New method allows scientists to watch brain cells interacting in real time
An advance by UCLA neuroscientists could lead to a better understanding of astrocytes, a star-shaped brain cell believed to play a key role in neurological disorders like Lou Gehrig's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's disease. (2018-04-04)

Penn researchers discover the source of new neurons in brain hippocampus
Researchers have shown, in mice, that one type of stem cell that makes adult neurons is the source of this lifetime stock of new cells in the hippocampus. These findings may help neuroscientists figure out how to maintain youthful conditions for learning and memory, and repair and regenerate parts of the brain after injury and aging. (2019-03-28)

Hunting for the brain's opioid addiction switch
New research by Steven Laviolette's research team at Western University is contributing to a better understanding of the ways opiate-class drugs modify brain circuits to drive the addiction cycle. The identification of these opiate-induced changes offers the best hope for developing more effective pharmacological targets and therapies to prevent or reverse the effect of opiate exposure and addiction. These results were presented at the 10th Annual Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, May 31, 2016, in Toronto, Canada. (2016-05-31)

Deciphering the emergence of neuronal diversity
Neuroscientists at UNIGE have analysed the diversity of inhibitory interneurons during the developmental period surrounding birth. They have discovered the emergence of three main sub-groups of interneurons by decoding the expression of cell-type specific genes as well as their exact, and often unexpected, location in the cortex. These results should help researchers in discovering how psychiatric-related genetic disturbances impact the emergence of neuronal sub-types and how to design novel cell-type specific interventions. (2017-01-30)

The anatomy of pain
Emotions consist of general components that are also elicited by similar impressions and specific components. (2016-03-23)

Watching a memory form
Neuroscientists at Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science have discovered a novel mechanism for memory formation. Voltage-sensitive dye imaging of the swim motor program of the sea slug Tritonia reveals that some neurons possess characteristics that predispose them to join neural networks in which learning is taking place. The findings represent a shift from the field's long-term focus on synaptic plasticity. (2015-11-05)

29th ECNP Congress for Applied and Translational Neuroscience
Europe's largest meeting in applied and translational neuroscience, the 29th ECNP Congress of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ECNP) will take place at the Austria Center Vienna from Sept. 17-20, 2016. Between 4,000 and 6,000 psychiatrists, neuroscientists, neurologists and psychologists are expected to attend the Vienna congress. (2016-08-10)

Monkeys' brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor task
Scientists have previously shown that when one animal watches another performing a motor task, such as reaching for food, mirror neurons in the motor cortex of the observer's brain start firing as though the observer were also reaching for food. New Duke research appearing March 29 in the journal Scientific Reports suggests mirroring in monkeys is also influenced by social factors, such as proximity to other animals, social hierarchy and competition for food. (2018-03-29)

The female brain reacts more strongly to prosocial behavior than the male brain
Behavioral Experiments show that women are more generous than men. Now, researchers at the UZH have been able to demonstrate that female and male brains process prosocial and selfish behavior differently. For women, prosocial behavior triggers a stronger reward signal, while male reward systems respond more strongly to selfish behavior. (2017-10-09)

Neuropathic pain unmasks subliminal excitation in pain processing circuits
Research by Steven Prescott, at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children, sheds new light on the mechanism underlying the establishment of neuropathic pain. Experiments by Kwan Lee and Stéphanie Ratté in the Prescott lab show that dysregulation of chloride reduces inhibition across pain processing circuits, unmasking vast amounts of subliminal excitation in neurons that promote transmission of pain signals. These results were presented at the 10th Annual Canadian Neuroscience Meeting, on June 1, in Toronto. (2016-06-01)

How dopamine drives brain activity
Using a specialized magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sensor that can track dopamine levels, MIT neuroscientists have discovered how dopamine released deep within the brain influences distant brain regions. (2020-04-01)

Resynchronizing neurons to erase schizophrenia
Today, a decisive step in understanding schizophrenia has been taken. Researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) have succeeded not only in deciphering a cellular mechanism leading to the desynchronization of neural networks, but also in correcting this organizational defect in an adult animal model, thereby suppressing abnormal behaviors associated with schizophrenia. Results that show that a therapeutic intervention is possible at all ages. (2018-09-17)

New '4-D goggles' allow wearers to be 'touched' by approaching objects
A team of researchers at UC San Diego and San Diego State University has developed a pair of '4-D goggles' that allows wearers to be physically 'touched' by a movie when they see a looming object on the screen, such as an approaching spacecraft. (2018-02-08)

Dissecting artificial intelligence to better understand the human brain
In the natural world, intelligence takes many forms. It could be a bat using echolocation to expertly navigate in the dark, or an octopus adapting its behavior to survive in the deep ocean. Likewise, in the computer science world, multiple forms of artificial intelligence are emerging. As will be presented at the CNS conference, cognitive neuroscientists are using those emerging networks to enhance understanding of one of the most elusive intelligence systems, the human brain. (2018-03-25)

Neuroscience 2016 media registration now open
San Diego becomes the epicenter of neuroscience in November as 30,000 researchers, clinicians, and advocates from around the world gather November 12-16 to explore and share the latest developments in brain research. At Neuroscience 2016, the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, leading experts will cover a host of hot topics including neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's, developmental disorders like autism, psychiatric disorders, innovative technologies, and new treatment approaches to brain disorders. (2016-07-22)

Approaching the perception of touch in the brain
More than ten percent of the cerebral cortex are involved in processing information about our sense of touch -- a larger area than previously thought. This is the result of a joint study by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and Ruhr Universität Bochum. (2019-11-25)

Rutgers researchers advance stem cell therapy with biodegradable scaffold
Rutgers scientists have created a tiny, biodegradable scaffold to transplant stem cells and deliver drugs, which may help treat Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, aging brain degeneration, spinal cord injuries and traumatic brain injuries. Stem cell transplantation, which shows promise as a treatment for central nervous system diseases, has been hampered by low cell survival rates, incomplete differentiation of cells and limited growth of neural connections. (2018-11-05)

Modeling the rhythmic electrical activities of the brain
Researchers studying the brain have long been interested in its neural oscillations, the rhythmic electrical activity that plays an important role in the transmission of information within the brain's neural circuits. Working with the Wilson-Cowan model, a widely-used model in computational neuroscience that describes the average activity of populations of interconnected neurons, Leandro Alonso has designed a new mathematical tool to help explore the broad spectrum of responses possible from a simple neural circuit. (2017-01-24)

Diabetes-Alzheimer's link explored at Neuroscience 2019
Surprising links exist between diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, and researchers are beginning to unpack the pathology that connects the two. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system. (2019-10-07)

Neuroscientists identify brain circuit that integrates head motion with visual signals
Neuroscientists at the Sainsbury Wellcome Centre have identified a circuit in the primary visual cortex (V1) of the brain that integrates head- and visual-motion signals. The study, published today in Neuron, elucidates the mechanisms by which visual and vestibular inputs to the brain sum together to enable appropriate behavioural responses. (2018-03-15)

Tics are common in famous boys choir
'Tis the season for choirs to raise their voices in holiday song. (2017-12-20)

Brain-wide tracing of single neurons reveals breadth of information transfer from visual cortex
An international collaboration of neuroscientists have today published a paper in Nature demonstrating the breadth of neural communication in visual cortex using a combination of methods for tracing the projections of individual neurons across the brain. (2018-03-28)

Resting easy: Oxygen promotes deep, restorative sleep, study shows
Exposure to high levels of oxygen encourages the brain to remain in deep, restorative sleep, according to a new study by University of Alberta neuroscientists. (2018-12-12)

Understanding the smallest brain circuits
Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have found a previously unseen pattern among the rapid-firing neurons inside the brain, one that reveals how distinct networks located in specific areas compete and even suppress each other. (2018-02-28)

Organoid research revealed at Neuroscience 2019
Mini-brains, also called organoids, may offer breakthroughs in clinical research by allowing scientists to study human brain cells without a human subject. Hear leading scientists announce their new findings at Neuroscience 2019, the world's largest source of emerging news and cutting-edge research on the brain and nervous system. (2019-09-30)

Alexa and Siri in our head: Where voice recognition occurs in the brain
Amazon recently announced that its language assistant Alexa is now able to recognise voices. What is celebrated as a tech revolution is an everyday process for our brain. So far, it has been unclear as to which areas of the brain we use to differentiate voices. The Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences has just uncovered new findings: Our personal assistant for voice recognition uses a convolution in the right temporal lobe. (2017-12-22)

New study suggests ovarian hormone may make drug withdrawal symptoms worse for women
Researchers found that a form of the estrogen hormone can contribute to drug relapse in females by worsening withdrawal symptoms. The study looked at the interaction of the female sex hormone estradiol and methamphetamine. (2018-06-18)

Study reveals molecular mechanisms of memory formation
MIT neuroscientists have uncovered a cellular pathway that allows specific synapses to become stronger during memory formation. The findings provide the first glimpse of the molecular mechanism by which long term memories are encoded in a region of the hippocampus called CA3. (2018-02-08)

Networks of brain activity predict vulnerability to depression
Tapping into the electrical chatter between different regions of the brain may provide a new way to prevent and treat depression. Duke University scientists showed that mice that were more susceptible to developing depression-like symptoms displayed different networks of electrical brain activity than more resilient mice. These results could be the first step toward a test to predict a person's vulnerability to developing mental illness. (2018-03-01)

Are hormones a 'female problem' for animal research?
Women, but not men, are often still described as 'hormonal' or 'emotional,' an outdated stereotype that poses a critical problem for public health, writes Rebecca Shansky in this Perspective. (2019-05-30)

Brain cells divide the work to recognize bodies
Specific regions of the brain are specialized in recognizing bodies of animals and human beings. By measuring the electrical activity per cell, scientists from KU Leuven, Belgium, and the University of Glasgow have shown that the individual brain cells in these areas do different things. Their response to specific contours or body shapes is very selective. (2016-04-28)

Protein Strengthens Link Between Addiction And Long-Term Memory
Johns Hopkins scientists have discovered a new protein, called Homer, that becomes active in rat brain cells during exposure to cocaine and during a lab model of long-term memory creation (1997-03-27)

Serotonin promotes perseverance
It was thought that the neurotransmitter serotonin most likely acted by inhibiting behavior. Now, scientists at the Champalimaud Centre for the Unknown have shown that general idea to be wrong. (2018-03-08)

What's coming next? Scientists identify how the brain predicts speech
A new study, publishing on April 25 in the open access journal PLOS Biology, has shed light on how the brain helps us to predict what is coming next in speech. (2017-04-25)

CCNY psychologists develop new model that links emotions and mental health
For decades psychologists have studied how people regulate emotions using a multitude of ways to conceptualize and assess emotion regulation. Now a recent study published this week in the journal PLOS ONE by Elliot Jurist and David M. Greenberg of The City College of New York, shows how a new assessment model can give clinicians an exciting new way to think about clinical diagnoses including anxiety, mood, and developmental disorders. (2017-10-19)

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