Popular Neurosurgery News and Current Events

Popular Neurosurgery News and Current Events, Neurosurgery News Articles.
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Sleep chemical central to effectiveness of deep brain stimulation
A brain chemical that makes us sleepy also appears to play a central role in the success of deep brain stimulation to ease symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease and other brain disorders. The surprising finding is outlined in a paper published online Dec. 23 in Nature Medicine. (2007-12-23)

First use of graphene to detect cancer cells
By interfacing brain cells onto graphene, researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have shown they can differentiate a single hyperactive cancerous cell from a normal cell, pointing the way to developing a simple, noninvasive tool for early cancer diagnosis. (2016-12-19)

Traumatic brain injury biomarker shows promise to support rapid damage evaluation and predict outcomes
A new study in The American Journal of Pathology found that a brain lipid molecule, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), was significantly increased after traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a preclinical animal model. They also found that it was elevated in areas associated with cell death and axonal injury, both major hallmarks of moderate and severe TBI. This strengthens the evidence that LPA could be used as a biomarker of TBI through blood testing, potentially providing a prognostic indicator of injury and outcome. (2018-07-16)

Workplace stress can take a toll on your brain surgeon, too
A new study by the Keck School of Medicine of USC finds that two-thirds of neurosurgeons experience burnout during training, and stressors at work are partly to blame. (2018-02-09)

Glioblastoma nanomedicine crosses into brain in mice, eradicates recurring brain cancer
A new synthetic protein nanoparticle capable of slipping past the nearly impermeable blood-brain barrier in mice could deliver cancer-killing drugs directly to malignant brain tumors, new research from the University of Michigan shows. (2020-11-10)

Is there a difference in patient outcomes if a surgeon is involved in overlapping surgeries?
Overlapping surgery, defined as a surgeon's involvement in two operations scheduled at the same or overlapping times, appeared safe for patients undergoing neurosurgery. (2017-11-08)

Artificial intelligence-based algorithm for intensive care of traumatic brain injury
A recent Finnish study, published in Scientific Reports, presents the first artificial intelligence (AI) based algorithm that may be utilized in the intensive care unit for treating patients with severe traumatic brain injury. The project is a collaborative project between three Finnish university hospitals: Helsinki University Hospital, Kuopio University Hospital and Turku University Hospital. (2019-11-27)

Traumatic brain injury and kids: New treatment guidelines issued
To help promote the highest standards of care, and improve the overall rates of survival and recovery following TBI, a panel of pediatric critical care, neurosurgery and other pediatric experts today issued the third edition of the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines for the Management of Pediatric Severe TBI. (2019-03-01)

Brain tumor patients fare better with private insurance, new study finds
Brain tumor patients who are uninsured or use Medicaid stay hospitalized longer and develop more medical complications than those with private insurance, University of Florida Health researchers have found. (2015-03-03)

Personalized cancer vaccine may increase long-term survival in patients with deadly brain cancer
An international Phase III study led by researchers at UCLA has found that a personalized GBM vaccine may increase long-term survival in some patients. (2018-06-04)

Smartphone-assisted neuroendoscopy
A variety of neurosurgical procedures are performed with the aid of smartphone-endoscope integration. The smartphone takes the place of a camera and video monitor. It is easy to use, more cost effective, and provides the surgeon with a more intuitive and fluid method of performing neuroendoscopy. (2018-03-13)

Aspiration as good as stent retrievers for removing large-vessel clots in stroke patients
ADAPT, an aspiration technique pioneered at the Medical University of South Carolina, is non-inferior to stent retrievers for mechanical thrombectomy in stroke patients with large-vessel clots, according to the preliminary results of the COMPASS trial reported at the International Stroke Conference on Jan. 25, 2018. (2018-01-25)

Prolonged exposure to air pollution leads to genetic changes in rat brains, study finds
Prolonged exposure to particulate matter in air pollution in the Los Angeles Basin triggered inflammation and the appearance of cancer-related genes in the brains of rats, a Cedars-Sinai study has found. (2018-05-08)

Penn's 'enhanced recovery' protocol reduces opioid use in spinal surgery patients
A novel 'Enhanced Recovery After Surgery' (ERAS) protocol developed by Penn Medicine for patients undergoing spinal and peripheral nerve surgery significantly reduced opioid use. The new study published in the Journal of Neurosurgery: Spine showed that when an ERAS protocol was employed, fewer patients needed pain medications one month after surgery. (2019-01-25)

Noninvasive brain tumor biopsy on the horizon
Taking a biopsy of a brain tumor is a complicated and invasive surgical process, but a team of researchers at Washington University in St. Louis is developing a way that allows them to detect tumor biomarkers through a simple blood test. (2018-04-26)

Newly discovered biomarkers could be key to predicting severity of brain tumor recurrence
Researchers have identified predictive biomarkers that could help assess the level of risk for recurrence in patients with malignant glioma. The study, led by Henry Ford Health System, was published today in Cell Reports. In an analysis of 200 tumor samples, the authors identified a set of epigenetic biomarkers that can predict, at a patient's initial diagnosis, which tumors are likely to recur with a more aggressive tumor type. (2018-04-10)

Amyloid protein transmission through neurosurgery
Amyloid beta pathology -- protein deposits in the brain - might have been transmitted by contaminated neurosurgical instruments, suggests a new UCL-led study. For the paper, published in Acta Neuropathologica, researchers studied the medical records of four people who had brain bleeds caused by amyloid beta build-up in brain blood vessels. All four people had undergone neurosurgery two or three decades earlier as children or teenagers, raising the possibility that amyloid beta deposition may be transmissible. (2018-02-15)

New method lets doctors quickly assess severity of brain injuries
A new way to rapidly assess levels of consciousness in people with head injuries could improve patient care. (2018-04-10)

Methamphetamine use linked to heightened stroke risk in the young
The stimulant methamphetamine, also popularly known as 'speed,' 'ice' and 'meth,' is linked to a heightened risk of stroke among young people, reveals a review of the available evidence, published online in the Journal of Neurology Neurosurgery & Psychiatry. (2017-08-23)

Golf as a contact sport?
The authors describe how the modern golfer repeatedly experiences minor traumatic injuries to the spine, which over time can result in a pathogenic process termed 'repetitive traumatic discopathy.' (2019-02-05)

Industry to play critical role in funding neurosurgery research
With federal funding increasingly restricted, industry will play a critical role in funding neurosurgery research, according to a report by three prominent neurosurgeons in the journal World Neurosurgery. (2017-08-09)

MD Anderson study shows FGL2 protein may be an effective target for glioblastoma
Glioblastoma (GBM) does not attract robust T cell immune responses. FGL2 is highly expressed in GBM and when present in tumor cells, controls a specialized group of dendritic cells which activates T cells. (2019-01-25)

Study sheds light on how 'dopamine neurons' contribute to memory formation in humans
Research from Cedars-Sinai sheds light on how the human brain rapidly forms new memories, providing insights into potential new treatments for memory disorders. A new study examined neurons that produce dopamine, a compound that acts as a transmitter for nerve impulses. It found that these dopamine neurons play a critical role in the formation of episodic memory, which allows people to remember such things as where they parked the car in the morning and what they had for dinner last night. (2018-05-02)

The 'Goldilocks' principle for curing brain cancer
University of Minnesota Medical School researchers found that a stable body temperature holds the key to awakening the body's immune response to fight off brain cancer. (2019-10-04)

Helmet use associated with reduced risk of cervical spine injury during motorcycle crashes
Despite claims that helmets do not protect the cervical spine during a motorcycle crash and may even increase the risk of injury, researchers from the University of Wisconsin Hospitals and Clinics in Madison found that, during an accident, helmet use lowers the likelihood of cervical spine injury (CSI), particularly fractures of the cervical vertebrae. (2018-03-06)

Researchers advise the use of anaesthesia in foetuses from 21 weeks of gestation
From the second trimester of pregnancy, the future baby already shows signs of pain when given a harmful stimulus or as a response to stress. In response to this confirmation, the researchers indicate the need to anaesthetise the foetus during open foetal surgery, OFS. (2018-03-16)

Medical research influenced by training 'genealogy'
By analyzing peer-reviewed scientific papers that examined the effectiveness of a surgical procedure, researchers at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine provide evidence suggesting that the conclusions of these studies appear to be influenced by the authors' mentors and medical training. (2016-01-04)

Simple one-page tool improves patient satisfaction with doctor visit
A simple, one-page form given to patients ahead of their doctor visit can significantly improve satisfaction with the care they receive, according to a study by Duke Health researchers. (2018-04-17)

Training the prescriber
The authors assess the effect of a mandatory educational program and new institutional prescriber guidelines on the behavior of physicians who prescribe opioid medications following lumbar surgery. (2019-02-05)

Stem cells show promise as drug delivery tool for childhood brain cancer
UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers showed they could shrink tumors in laboratory models of medulloblastoma, and extend life. The study, published in PLOS ONE, is a necessary step toward developing clinical trials that would see if the approach works for children. (2018-08-29)

The effectiveness of electrical stimulation in producing spinal fusion
Researchers from The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of published data on the effect of electrical stimulation therapies on spinal fusion. They found significant improvement overall in the rates of bone fusion following a course of electrical stimulation in both preclinical (animal) and clinical (human) studies. (2019-10-08)

Two surgical approaches equal in treating infection-caused hydrocephalus
Implanting a shunt or endoscopically reducing intracranial pressure and reducing fluid production are equally effective in treating infants with hydrocephalus caused by brain infections, according to an international team of researchers, but endoscopy may have fewer down-the-line complications. (2017-12-20)

New imaging system makes back surgery safer, faster and less expensive
Dartmouth College researchers develop a new way to make back surgery safer, faster and more cost effective. Professors from Thayer School of Engineering and Geisel School of Medicine develop and test a 3-dimensional, real-time optical tracking system, like a 'Google Maps' for the body. (2018-04-26)

Cancer trial led by University of Minnesota Medical School's Dr. Clark Chen shows promise
New data from a Phase I clinical trial led by Clark Chen, M.D., Ph.D., Lyle French Chair in Neurosurgery and Head of the University of Minnesota Medical School Department of Neurosurgery shows more than a quarter of patients with recurrent high-grade glioma, a form of brain cancer, were alive more than three years after treatment. (2017-10-27)

Qual­ity re­gisters for sur­gery ex­clude many treat­ment-re­lated ad­verse events
According to a recent study, many extensive national registries are primarily based on data collected for administrative purposes, and often feature selective and incomplete reporting of treatment outcomes. (2018-08-28)

Muscle gene mutations implicated in human nasal/sinus cancer
By sequencing the entire genomes of tumor cells from six people with a rare cancer of the nose and sinus cavity, Johns Hopkins researchers report they unexpectedly found the same genetic change -- one in a gene involved in muscle formation -- in five of the tumors. (2019-02-27)

Noninvasive eye scan could detect key signs of Alzheimer's years before patients show symptoms
Cedars-Sinai neuroscience investigators have found that Alzheimer's disease affects the retina -- the back of the eye -- similarly to the way it affects the brain. The study also revealed that an investigational, noninvasive eye scan could detect the key signs of Alzheimer's disease years before patients experience symptoms. (2017-08-17)

MRI scans predict patients' ability to fight the spread of cancer
A simple, non-invasive procedure that can indicate how long patients with cancer that has spread to the brain might survive and whether they are likely to respond to immunotherapy has been developed by researchers in Liverpool. (2017-12-12)

Holes in the head
UM neurorehabilitation expert Dr. David S. Kushner, who helps modern patients recover from brain surgery, chronicles the remarkable skill of ancient Peru's cranial surgeons. (2018-06-08)

Study finds surgeries performed later in the day have more complications
A new study published in Neurosurgery finds that patients who undergo a neurosurgical procedure with surgical start times between 9 pm and 7 am are at an increased risk of developing complications compared to patients with a surgical start time earlier in the day. (2017-10-13)

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