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Popular Neutrophils News and Current Events, Neutrophils News Articles.
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Mayo Clinic researchers identify potential new therapy for liver diseases
Drug therapy may effectively treat a potentially life-threatening condition associated with cirrhosis and other chronic liver diseases, according to a new study by Mayo Clinic researchers. (2019-03-22)

Immune study points to new ways to treat lung disease
Fresh insight into how the immune system keeps itself in check could lead to new ways of fighting chronic lung disease. (2017-08-14)

E-cigarettes may trigger unique and potentially damaging immune responses
E-cigarettes appear to trigger unique immune responses as well as the same ones that cigarettes trigger that can lead to lung disease, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine. (2017-10-20)

Surprise rheumatoid arthritis discovery points to new treatment
Researchers have identified an unexpected contributor to rheumatoid arthritis that may help explain the painful flare-ups associated with the disease. The discovery points to a potential new treatment for the autoimmune disorder and may also allow the use of a simple blood test to detect people at elevated risk for developing the condition. (2019-02-22)

Disrupted gut microbiome makes children more susceptible to amoebic dysentery
Children with lower diversity of microbial species in their intestines are more susceptible to severe infection with the Entamoeba histolytica parasite, according to a new study published in PLOS Pathogens. (2017-08-17)

Boosting natural defenses to fight antibiotic-resistant pneumonia
Antibiotic resistance is a growing threat in bacterial pneumonia. While immune-stimulating treatments can help the body fight the invaders, they can also cause inflammation that damages and weakens lung tissue. But new research suggests a way to enhance bacterial killing without the inflammation. (2018-04-04)

A novel mechanism that regulates cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation
Phagocytes such as macrophages and neutrophils contain multiple lysosomes, which possess a variety of digestive enzymes. Upon stimulation, phagocytes secrete these digestive enzymes through a process called lysosomal exocytosis to lyse external pathogens or tumor cells. A research team led by investigators at Kanazawa University identified myoferlin as a critical regulator of this process. Furthermore, they found that it plays an important role in inducing cellular injury by phagocytes during inflammation (Figure 1). (2018-12-21)

White blood cells are picky about sugar
A unique sugar recognized by white blood cells stimulates robust engulfment and killing of fungi, and might be useful to fight microbial infections that are resistant to current treatments. (2007-07-11)

A bad influence: the interplay between tumor cells and immune cells
Research at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) at the University of Utah (U of U) yielded new insights into the environment surrounding different types of lung tumors, and described how these complex cell ecosystems may in turn ultimately affect response to treatment. The results were published today in Immunity and featured on the print cover of the journal. (2018-10-16)

Scientists identify immune cascade that fuels complications, tissue damage in chlamydia infections
Research in mice pinpoints immune mechanism behind tissue damage and complications of chlamydia infection, the most common sexually transmitted disease in the United States. Separate immune mechanisms drive bacterial clearance versus immune-mediated tissue damage and subsequent disease. Therapies are needed to avert irreversible reproductive organ damage that can arise as a result of silent infections that go untreated. (2018-02-13)

New target in certain leukemias discovered, could be treated with existing drug
Researchers at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine and Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center have discovered a target in several types of leukemia that could be treated with an existing Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for other types of blood cancers. (2018-07-05)

Medicine-carriers made from human cells can cure lung infections
Scientists used human white blood cell membranes to carry two drugs, an antibiotic and an anti-inflammatory, directly to infected lungs in mice. The nano-sized drug delivery method successfully treated both the bacterial growth and inflammation in the mice's lungs. The study shows a potential new strategy for treating infectious diseases, including COVID-19. (2020-12-03)

Overcoming the last line of antibiotic resistance against bacterial infections
A recent study published in Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology presents a comprehensive overview of S. aureus' remarkable resilience against our body's immune system and how to better protect against deadly infections, with implications for overcoming antibiotic resistance. (2017-08-21)

High-fat diet and age alter microflora and cause inflammation in heart failure
Growing older and a high-fat diet enriched with omega 6 fatty acids are major contributors to health risks ranging from diabetes to heart failure. How these factors regulate the immune response is now described -- a calorie-dense, obesity-generating diet in aging mice disrupts the composition of the gut microbiome. This correlates with development of a system-wide nonresolving inflammation in acute heart failure, with a notable disruption of the immune cell profile, primarily the neutrophil-leukocyte ratio. (2019-03-01)

FDA-approved drug may block resistance to anti-angiogenesis therapy
A Massachusetts General Hospital research team has identified a potential strategy for improving the efficacy of angiogenesis inhibitors, drugs that help fight cancer by blocking the formation of new blood vessels. (2017-09-13)

The immune cells that help tumors instead of destroying them
EPFL scientists have discovered that neutrophils, a type of immune cell, can actually help lung tumors grow. The work is published in Cell Reports, and has enormous implications for cancer immunotherapy. (2017-12-12)

Potential new treatment for kidney failure in cancer patients
Kidney dysfunction is a frequent complication affecting more than 50 percent of all cancer patients, and is directly linked to poor survival. Despite the high occurrence, it is still not clear how presence of a tumor contributes to kidney dysfunction and how this can be prevented. A new study from researchers at Uppsala University shows that kidney dysfunction can be caused by the patient's own immune system, 'tricked' by the tumor to become activated. (2017-04-25)

Linking wound healing and cancer risk
When our skin is damaged, a whole set of biological processes springs into action to heal the wound. Now, researchers from the VIB-UGent Center for Inflammation Research have shown that one of the molecules involved in this, HMGB1, slows down wound healing. It is, however, also essential for tumor formation at sites of previous injury. The researchers found that HMGB1 controls the actions of neutrophils, a specific type of immune cells, in skin wounds and that this is crucial for cancer initiation. (2019-11-26)

Researchers find immune cells help rebuild damaged nerves
Immune cells are normally associated with fighting infection but in a new study, scientists have discovered how they also help the nervous system clear debris, clearing the way for nerve regeneration after injury. In a study published in the Journal of Neuroscience, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine showed certain immune cells--neutrophils--can clean up nerve debris, while previous models have attributed nerve cell damage control to other cells entirely. (2017-10-25)

How the germ behind flesh-eating disease hijacks neurons to avoid immune destruction
A study conducted in mice reveals that neurons play key role in the development of flesh-eating disease. The findings show that a bacterium that causes flesh-eating disease hijacks the normal crosstalk between nervous and immune systems to avoid immune destruction, thus ensuring its own survival. Two approaches prevent infections, halt disease progression in mice. (2018-05-10)

Team uncovers cellular responses to bird flu vaccine
New research from Vanderbilt eavesdrops on gene expression in human immune system cells before and after vaccination against bird flu, exposing cellular responses associated with a vaccine constituent called AS03, short for adjuvant system 03. Using massive computation, the investigators pursue a systems biology approach, providing a new wealth of detail about vaccine responses and data for the generation of new hypotheses. (2017-01-19)

Atherosclerosis: Endogenous peptide lowers cholesterol
Cells of the innate immune system that play an important role in development of atherosclerosis contain a protein that reduces levels of cholesterol in mice -- and thus helps to inhibit or mitigate the disease. (2017-01-19)

Study: Understanding white blood cells' defense mechanisms could lead to better treatments
A laboratory-created microscopic network of fibers helped researchers understand how white blood cells capture and even kill bacteria, offering insight into the effectiveness of antibiotics in the future. (2019-01-31)

New technology promises improved treatment of inflammatory diseases
A study led by researchers at Washington State University has uncovered a potential new treatment approach for diseases associated with inflammation, including sepsis and stroke. Their paper describes a novel technology that uses nanosized particles to transport cell-killing drugs directly to activated neutrophils, the cells that drive the exaggerated immune response involved in inflammatory diseases. They also demonstrated the technology's feasibility at killing activated neutrophils without harming other cell types or compromising the immune system. (2019-11-06)

Fighting age-related fibrosis to keep organs young
Their research indicates that an already-FDA-approved drug used by cystic fibrosis patients could shield our organs from fibrosis during acute events, like lung infection or heart attack. And looking to the future, they envision that the development of a once-daily pill, capable of inhibiting PAD4, could one day be used as a preventative measure. (2017-01-30)

Study points to new weapon in fight against lethal fungi
Researchers at Australia's Monash University have gained insights into how nanoparticles could develop a biosensor to prevent deadly diseases contracted on medical equipment, such as catheters. (2019-11-09)

Researchers closer to new Alzheimer's therapy with brain blood flow discovery
By discovering the culprit behind decreased blood flow in the brain of people with Alzheimer's, biomedical engineers at Cornell University have made possible promising new therapies for the disease. (2019-02-11)

Cells sacrifice themselves to boost immune response to viruses
Whether flu or coronavirus, it can take several days for the body to ramp up an effective response to a viral infection. New research appearing in the journal Nature Immunology describes how different cells in the immune system work together, communicate, and - in the case of cells called neutrophils - bring about their own death to help fight off infections. The findings could have important implications for the development of vaccines and anti-viral therapies. (2020-09-30)

Gene activity database could spare thousands of mice
A comprehensive database of gene activity in mice across ten disease models, which could significantly reduce animal use worldwide, has been developed by scientists at the Francis Crick Institute, which gives a full picture of the immune response to different pathogens. (2019-06-28)

New NYUAD research finds 3D printers offer alternate method to create microfluidic probes
Biomedical engineers at NYU Abu Dhabi are using 3D printers to create new technologies that may help biologists make important discoveries pertaining to cancer research. (2018-08-08)

Compound found in red wine causes conflicting changes in dogs' immune systems
Researchers at the University of Missouri have found that resveratrol does affect the immune systems of dogs in different ways when introduced to dogs' blood. (2015-08-24)

KAIST identifies the cause of sepsis-induced lung injury
A KAIST research team succeeded in visualizing pulmonary microcirculation and circulating cells in vivo with a custom-built 3D intravital lung microscopic imaging system. They found a type of leukocyte called neutrophils aggregate inside the capillaries during sepsis-induced acute lung injury (ALI), leading to disturbances and dead space in blood microcirculation. According to the researchers, this phenomenon is responsible for tissue hypoxia causing lung damage in the sepsis model, and mitigating neutrophils improves microcirculation as well as hypoxia. (2019-05-07)

Impeding white blood cells in antiphospholipid syndrome reduced blood clots
A new study examined APS at the cellular level and found that two drugs reduced development of blood clots in mice affected with the condition. (2019-04-25)

Trojan Horse: How a killer fungus unleashes meningitis and brain infection
In a world first, Australian researchers have revealed how a deadly fungus and primary cause of life-threatening meningitis exploits the immune system like a 'Trojan Horse' to promote infection. (2018-06-18)

New non-antibiotic strategy for the treatment of bacterial meningitis
With the increasing threat of antibiotic resistance, there is a growing need for new treatment strategies against life threatening bacterial infections. Researchers at Lund University in Sweden and the University of Copenhagen may have identified such an alternative treatment for bacterial meningitis, a serious infection that can lead to sepsis. The study is published in Nature Communications. (2019-04-10)

Infant-friendly flu vaccine developed with key protein
According to the World Health Organization, influenza causes serious illness among millions of people each year, resulting in 250,000 to 500,000 deaths. Those most at risk include infants younger than six months, because they cannot be vaccinated against the disease. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri School of Medicine have identified a naturally occurring protein that, when added to the flu vaccine, may offer protection to babies during their first months of life. (2016-01-19)

Cellular alterations increase vulnerability of obese and diabetic individuals to infection
A study published in Scientific Reports identifies changes to neutrophils that appear to explain why people suffering from obesity and type 2 diabetes are more likely to contract infectious diseases. (2019-02-26)

A mouse or an elephant: what species fights infection more effectively?
Hamilton College Assistant Professor of Biology Cynthia Downs led a study with co-authors from North Dakota State University, University of California, Davis, Eckerd College, and University of South Florida that investigated whether body mass was related to concentrations of two important immune cell types in the blood among hundreds of species of mammals ranging from tiny Jamaican fruit bats (~40 g) to giant killer whales (~5,600 kg). (2019-09-25)

Nanoparticles target anti-inflammatory drugs where needed
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago have developed a system for precisely delivering anti-inflammatory drugs to immune cells gone out of control, while sparing their well-behaved counterparts. Their findings were published online Feb. 23 in Nature Nanotechnology. (2014-02-23)

Scientists reminded immune cells on what side they should be
International group of scientists in the joint study of the laboratory of the Wistar Institute, University of Pittsburgh and I.M. Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University discovered that during the cancer development immune cells called neutrophils begin to prevent other immune cells from fighting tumor and decelerate treatment. The scientists demonstrated that suppressing the activity of protein causing such changes allows to delay cancer development. The research details are published in Nature. (2019-06-07)

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